Need Explanation for class C hosting

6 replies
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I was curious of my current link networks IP arrangement because I know a diverse IP range is ideal for link building and they said they use hundreds of class c blocks to host their sites. What does this mean? I assume this a large server base or similar. Wouldnt using more than one site per block throw up red flags for google or does this matter less than a site having its own IP?

If I am completely off on this please educate me. Thanks =)
#class #explanation #hosting
  • Profile picture of the author Danial09
    if you can afford, try to buy 10 different cheap hosting and build up 100 sites and this kind of sites can be used as a small empire network and build good backlinks easily without any effort for any new site created.
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  • Profile picture of the author NeillSEO
    Ok. The fact that it is a class C network tells google that if the 3rd octet or earlier is different, you are on a different network. So, 201.200.200.xxx is completely different in google's eyes than 201.200.201.xxx.

    The Class C network range is from 192.0.0.0 to 223.255.255.0. So if your websites have addresses in that range, they are on a Class C network, and as long as the third set of numbers OR EARLIER is different, then Google will see the websites as being separate.

    More than one site per block may make it appear as though your site is being hosted through the same place.

    200.200.201.1 and 200.200.201.2 are in the same C "block", while 200.200.201.1 and 200.200.202.2 are in separate C "blocks" and appear to be coming from completely different "networks".

    I really don't know how to explain better. I hope that didn't make the confusion worse.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ross James
      [DELETED]
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      • Profile picture of the author NeillSEO
        I guess the post above this one was deleted?

        Originally Posted by Ross James View Post

        A class C is actually; 255.255.255.0 not 223.255.255.0

        -Ross
        I wasn't talking about the subnet mask. A class C subnet is /24 or 255.255.255.0.

        The actual range of available IP addresses in the Class C range is 192.0.0.0 to 223.255.255.0.

        10.1.2.3 is still a Class A network even if you set your subnet mask to 255.255.255.0.

        10 is the network number
        1 and 2 would be subnet numbers
        3 would be the host
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    • Profile picture of the author Ross James
      Originally Posted by NeillSEO View Post

      I guess the post above this one was deleted?



      I wasn't talking about the subnet mask. A class C subnet is /24 or 255.255.255.0.

      The actual range of available IP addresses in the Class C range is 192.0.0.0 to 223.255.255.0.

      10.1.2.3 is still a Class A network even if you set your subnet mask to 255.255.255.0.

      10 is the network number
      1 and 2 would be subnet numbers
      3 would be the host
      I figured out what you meant after I posted my comment. Sorry for the confusion.
      Originally Posted by NeillSEO View Post

      Ok. The fact that it is a class C network tells google that if the 3rd octet or earlier is different, you are on a different network. So, 201.200.200.xxx is completely different in google's eyes than 201.200.201.xxx.

      The Class C network range is from 192.0.0.0 to 223.255.255.0. So if your websites have addresses in that range, they are on a Class C network, and as long as the third set of numbers OR EARLIER is different, then Google will see the websites as being separate.

      More than one site per block may make it appear as though your site is being hosted through the same place.

      200.200.201.1 and 200.200.201.2 are in the same C "block", while 200.200.201.1 and 200.200.202.2 are in separate C "blocks" and appear to be coming from completely different "networks".

      I really don't know how to explain better. I hope that didn't make the confusion worse.

      To simplify things even more, just make sure that the third block of numbers is unique. So as long as the letter X in 192.168.X.254 is different per server where you host your site, Google will have NO clue in your spamming efforts.

      Hope that helps,

      Ross

      P.S. As far as I know hostgator allows unique class C addresses in their hosting, so for $100 dollars or so a month, you could keep all of your spamming under one host.
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      • Profile picture of the author NeillSEO
        Originally Posted by Ross James View Post

        I figured out what you meant after I posted my comment. Sorry for the confusion.



        To simplify things even more, just make sure that the third block of numbers is unique. So as long as the letter X in 192.168.X.254 is different per server where you host your site, Google will have NO clue in your spamming efforts.

        Hope that helps,

        Ross
        definitely easier way to put it
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  • Profile picture of the author Ross James
    Thanks Neil, my last job, in the job world I was a network engineer. I also have Cisco certifications, So my eyes lit up when I saw a post on subnetting

    Best,

    -Ross
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