Trying to make sense of C Class IPs

7 replies
  • SEO
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The more I read about this, the more contradictions I find.

If I have multiple hosting accounts at godaddy, are they each on a seperate C Class? Do they need to have dedicated IP addresses?

I also read that if all your sites share the same nameservers, that more or less cancels the benefits of having various C Class accounts. If that were true, wouldn't that mean that I'd basically get no credit from any other site hosted with godaddy because they're all on the same nameservers? I can't imagine that is the case when you consider the millions of sites they host.

What is the approach to getting the SEO benefits from multiple C Class IPs? How do you set this up properly?
#class #ips #make #sense
  • Profile picture of the author kposs
    There are only 2 situations that I can think of where separate class C IP addresses are warranted.

    1. You are setting up a network of sites to use for backlinks. In this case, it is most helpful if each site is on a unique class C IP address so that you get IP diversity in your backlinks.

    2. You are trying to rank multiple sites for the same keyword. Here, I would make the sites as unique as possible including different class C IP addresses, domain owner info, name servers, etc. I did this on a local term and made each domain as unique as I could. Worked great.

    Unless you're looking at one of the two instances above, you do not need to worry about separate class C IP addresses or name servers. If you are on a shared server, your accounts are most likely on the same Class C. You can check them here:

    DIG online

    Just enter your domain name, leave name server blank and leave the query type as "Address (A)" and it'll give you your IP address for the domain.

    The name servers are probably less important. As you said, there are a ton of people that host with GoDaddy and use their name servers. You'd probably be better off using a different name/address for the domain registration.
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    • Profile picture of the author MandoThrasher
      Originally Posted by kposs View Post

      1. You are setting up a network of sites to use for backlinks. In this case, it is most helpful if each site is on a unique class C IP address so that you get IP diversity in your backlinks.
      Bingo! So can I accomplish this with seperate hosting accounts at godaddy? Or do I need to get accounts at different hosting providers?

      Good point about the domain regs. How do I work around that?

      Thanks

      P.S. I'm in NC too.
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      • Profile picture of the author kposs
        Originally Posted by MandoThrasher View Post

        Bingo! So can I accomplish this with seperate hosting accounts at godaddy? Or do I need to get accounts at different hosting providers?
        Possibly. I don't use GoDaddy for hosting, so I can't say for sure. When I set up accounts at HostGator on a shared service, they typically share class C IP addresses.

        HostGator has a specific SEO Hosting site. If I set up a network, I would do it there simply because HostGator has been fairly reliable for me. I've seen a lot of people have problems with unreliable Class C hosting providers.

        Check for reviews at Backlinks Forum. Many people there set up networks and post their experience with the different hosts.

        Originally Posted by MandoThrasher View Post

        Good point about the domain regs. How do I work around that?
        I just used the names of different family members, their addresses and public email accounts (gmail). I made all of my domain registrations private just to add one more layer, but typically all contact for the domains is done via email so I didn't bother telling anyone I used their name You could just as easily make up names and addresses.
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          • Profile picture of the author webmaestro
            I wonder what everyone is thinking of doing once we go IPv6 (sooner than you may think too)?

            Anyone who wants an IP address then won't be given one. Instead they will be allocated a BLOCK of addresses (way bigger in scope than the current TOTALITY of ALL current Internet IPv4 addresses) and they will be exclusive, unique and assigned to that person/company/entity - i.e. your IP address(es) will uniquely identify you/your systems. No more stupid NAT; EVERY computer/device/phone etc. connecting to the web will have its own UNIQUE IP address and the Internet will FINALLY work the way it was always supposed to (or at least a LOT closer) with a PROPER full Internet address.

            When that happens all this search engine "gaming" nonsense over IP addresses will have to stop and everyone will have to think again about how they deal with multiple sites belonging to one entity.

            Here's a thought ... how does Google know whether two (or more) sites on the same IP (shared hosting) ACTUALLY belong to the same entity? It's NOT by the IP address (since MULTIPLE entities could legitimately be sharing that IP address - and probably are in most cases) but by the domain name/s and to whom they are registered ... Doh!

            BTW - good luck with getting NEW IPv4 Class C addresses - they've run out - last month in fact. So unless the ISP/Host you are with is prepared to let some go or still has a sufficiently large pool of unallocated addresses available you may find they won't give you one.

            IPv4 addresses are going to become harder and harder to obtain and (my guess) is that within the next 2 years MASSIVE change will hit the Internet in this area. It will be IMPOSSIBLE to access a NEW host that can ONLY have an IPv6 address unless every OTHER machine that wishes to connect to it is also using IPv6 (whether direct or tunnelled over IPv4) and therefore at that point ALL systems WILL have an IPv6 address - they will HAVE to or be faced with being unable to see ALL the web.

            Best regards.
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        • Profile picture of the author webmaestro
          Originally Posted by kposs View Post


          I just used the names of different family members, their addresses and public email accounts (gmail). I made all of my domain registrations private just to add one more layer, but typically all contact for the domains is done via email so I didn't bother telling anyone I used their name You could just as easily make up names and addresses.
          Err! I'm not claiming to be an expert in US law but I think you'll find that using blatantly false information to register domains is an offence that is liable to have Homeland Security and/or the FBI, FTC and God knows who else investigating you at some point.

          Check the T's & C's of your domain registrar and I think you'll see that it's covered in there. I'm also fairly certain ICANN's rules cover this too.

          Best regards.
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          • Profile picture of the author ElectronPlumber
            I have three different shared hosting accounts with GoDaddy and two with Hostgator and all five are on different IPs and actually all on different Class A addresses too. I do this to make a groups of 3-5 sites in related niches then interlink them for the SEO boost.

            Does it work better than putting all 5 sites on one IP? Dunno, I've never tested it. Makes me feel better about it at least.

            They were opened months apart though. If you open two hosting accounts on GoDaddy the same day, there is a decent chance they'll end up on the same machine with the same IP.

            I've checked and my GoDaddy IPs are shared with 2000 other domains! The HostGators IPs have around 1000 domains and are noticeably faster to load, but also more expensive monthly. Could be that GoDaddy is using 4x better hardware, but somehow I doubt it.

            You can use a site like http://www.myipneighbors.com/ to see what other domains are also hosted on a given IP.
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