Question about C class ips

30 replies
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i just buy 150 c class ips hosting from a compnay but my friend said these are not c Clas ips these are A class ips.
so any one tell me Sure these Are C lass ips pool or A class ips also tell me All are A Class or some are C or D? please only Expoerts Reply in this Thread Thanks in Advanced

66.199.226.2
66.199.243.194
66.199.226.3
66.199.226.4
66.199.243.238
66.199.243.230
#class #ips #question
  • Profile picture of the author cardine
    These IPs are all in the same A class, all in the same B class, and almost all in the same C class.

    In total you got IPs from 2 different C classes (66.199.243.xx and 66.199.226.xx).

    If you were promised C class hosting, you got scammed.
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    • Profile picture of the author Melissa82
      Originally Posted by cardine View Post

      These IPs are all in the same A class, all in the same B class, and almost all in the same C class.

      In total you got IPs from 2 different C classes (66.199.243.xx and 66.199.226.xx).

      If you were promised C class hosting, you got scammed.
      Totally agree!!

      There are much more trustworthy proxy sites out there. Don't let this rotten egg spoil your opinion of the proxy business.

      Sorry to see this has happened to you. Feel free to tell us what site or individual scammed you.
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    • Profile picture of the author David williamm
      Originally Posted by cardine View Post

      These IPs are all in the same A class, all in the same B class, and almost all in the same C class.

      In total you got IPs from 2 different C classes (66.199.243.xx and 66.199.226.xx).

      If you were promised C class hosting, you got scammed.
      I am thinking the same you got 2 unique c class ip only
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  • Profile picture of the author tim_buchalka
    The third number is the IP is the C Class (Class C).

    You have THREE Class C's in that list.

    243, 226 and 231.
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  • Profile picture of the author tim_buchalka
    All of them are class C IP addresses. We are talking about the range of class C's used.

    All your class C IP addresses are from the same range

    66.199.226.*
    66.199.231.*
    66.199.243.*

    This is only a problem if you asked to have a larger range of different Class C's.

    It all depends on what you are going to use them for.
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  • Profile picture of the author warrich
    you mean to say C class ips Start from 66. not 192.0.1.1 to 223.255.254.254
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    • Profile picture of the author Jay McLaren
      66.199.226.2
      66(A).199(B).226(C).2(D)
      =
      A.B.C.D
      A.B.*C*.D

      C = the third block. When the number in the 3rd block is different, you are on a different C-Block( now commonly known as C-Class )

      More importantly, don't spend a lot of time stressing over this.

      The concept of spreading over different c-blocks/c-classes was developed by people trying to hide that they owned websites hosted on them. There is no hiding from Google at this point so working on this architecute is basically a waste of time.

      focus on building content and structures diverse and interesting to End-Users not search engine spiders/google.
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      • Profile picture of the author Melissa82
        Originally Posted by Jay McLaren View Post

        66.199.226.2
        66(A).199(B).226(C).2(D)
        =
        A.B.C.D
        A.B.*C*.D

        C = the third block. When the number in the 3rd block is different, you are on a different C-Block( now commonly known as C-Class )

        More importantly, don't spend a lot of time stressing over this.

        The concept of spreading over different c-blocks/c-classes was developed by people trying to hide that they owned websites hosted on them. There is no hiding from Google at this point so working on this architecute is basically a waste of time.

        focus on building content and structures diverse and interesting to End-Users not search engine spiders/google.
        You are correct but technically each of the four sections is called an "octet". A block refers to a sequential group of IPs.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rob3
    Those are all class A IP addresses, but that means absolutely nothing.

    Class A = 0.0.0.0 - 127.255.255.255
    Class B = 128.0.0.0 - 191.255.255.255
    Class C = 192.0.0.0 - 223.255.255.255

    The term "class C" is often misused to refer to a block of IP addresses where the first three sections (octets) are the same. Technically, that would be a /24 block, not a class C block.

    What you want are IP addresses that are on separate /24 blocks, but you didn't even get that.
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  • Profile picture of the author warrich
    i just talk with Seo compnay who giveing me these ips and thy said All Are C class ips not A Class.
    so how me proof them these are Class A not Class C?
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    • Profile picture of the author halfpoint
      Originally Posted by warrich View Post

      i just talk with Seo compnay who giveing me these ips and thy said All Are C class ips not A Class.
      so how me proof them these are Class A not Class C?
      So your SEO Hosting Company don't know what C Classes are?

      I think it's time for a new host.
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  • Profile picture of the author webdevpro
    Here is how IPs are classified: (The IPS in question are all 'A' class)

    Class A IP address ranges are for large networks with many devices (supports 16 million hosts on each of 126 networks). The first octet starts from 1 to 126.
    Class B IP address ranges are for medium-sized networks (supports 65,000 hosts on each of 16,000 networks). The first octet starts from 128 to 191.
    Class C IP address ranges are for small networks (supports 254 hosts on each of 2 million networks ). The first octet starts from 192 to 223.
    Class D IP address ranges are multicast addresses. The first octet starts with 224.
    Class E IP address with the first octet of 225 is used for experimental purposes only.
    • The IP address 127.0.0.1 is used as the loopback address. This means that it is used by the host computer to send a message back to itself. It is commonly used for troubleshooting and network testing.
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  • Profile picture of the author webdevpro
    Here is how IPs are classified: (The IPs in question are all 'A' class)

    Class A IP address : The first octet starts from 1 to 126.
    Class B IP address : The first octet starts from 128 to 191.
    Class C IP address : The first octet starts from 192 to 223.
    Class D IP address : The first octet starts with 224.
    Class E IP address with the first octet of 225 is used for experimental purposes only.
    • The IP address 127.0.0.1 is used as the loopback address. It is commonly used for troubleshooting and network testing.
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    • Profile picture of the author mrclean78
      Originally Posted by webdevpro View Post

      Here is how IPs are classified: (The IPs in question are all 'A' class)

      Class A IP address : The first octet starts from 1 to 126.
      Class B IP address : The first octet starts from 128 to 191.
      Class C IP address : The first octet starts from 192 to 223.
      Class D IP address : The first octet starts with 224.
      Class E IP address with the first octet of 225 is used for experimental purposes only.
      • The IP address 127.0.0.1 is used as the loopback address. It is commonly used for troubleshooting and network testing.

      Thanks for the refresher I was about to look that up myself.
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  • Profile picture of the author warrich
    Thy said proof us these are not C Class ips then we give you refund otherwise not
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    • Profile picture of the author halfpoint
      Originally Posted by warrich View Post

      Thy said proof us these are not C Class ips then we give you refund otherwise not
      There are 2 different C Classes in the IP's in your OP:

      226 and 243

      66.199.226.2
      66.199.226.3
      66.199.226.4

      66.199.243.194
      66.199.243.238
      66.199.243.230

      They clearly don't know what they're talking about.
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    • Profile picture of the author Melissa82
      Originally Posted by warrich View Post

      Thy said proof us these are not C Class ips then we give you refund otherwise not
      Ideally you want the third octet to be different for each IP address. The company only provided you with two different C Class IPs.

      The proxy site I deal with has provided me with multiple C Class IPs. Meaning the third octet of each IP I am given is different.

      If you asked for 100+ different C Class IPs then they have scammed you. You only have two different C Classes.
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  • Profile picture of the author warrich
    i am very am confused some saying these are A Class and Some Saying These are C Class no one Experts know These are A or C?
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    • Profile picture of the author halfpoint
      Originally Posted by warrich View Post

      i am very am confused some saying these are A Class and Some Saying These are C Class no one Experts know These are A or C?
      The bolded parts below are the C Classes:

      66.199.226.2
      66.199.226.3
      66.199.226.4

      66.199.243.194
      66.199.243.238
      66.199.243.230

      If they gave you all unique C Class IPs then all of the bolded numbers above would be different.

      They are 100% not unique C Class IP's.

      There is 2 different C Classes in those 6 IP's above.

      So, your host is ripping you off, but what's worse is that they clearly don't even know what C Class IP's are..

      Get a refund and a get a new host.
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      • Profile picture of the author Bshellz
        Originally Posted by Pat Jackson View Post

        The bolded parts below are the C Classes:

        66.199.226.2
        66.199.226.3
        66.199.226.4

        66.199.243.194
        66.199.243.238
        66.199.243.230

        If they gave you all unique C Class IPs then all of the bolded numbers above would be different.

        They are 100% not unique C Class IP's.

        There is 2 different C Classes in those 6 IP's above.

        So, your host is ripping you off, but what's worse is that they clearly don't even know what C Class IP's are..

        Get a refund and a get a new host.
        What Pat is saying is 100% correct. I am a National Account Manager for a Global Internet Provider. They gave you 2 different Class C's. Only HUGE internet service providers and very powerful companies have Class A IP's and they would not be selling them to just anyone. If they said they was giving you unique Class C's they lied. You need to go back and see what they promised to deliver to you.
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        "Being realistic is the most commonly traveled road to mediocrity"
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    • Profile picture of the author Mike Anthony
      Originally Posted by warrich View Post

      i am very am confused some saying these are A Class and Some Saying These are C Class no one Experts know These are A or C?

      Build networks and one of the few people that does full mentoring on how to build them. You've been told the truth by those telling you that you have not been given more than two class C Ips. One of two things is happening-

      A) you are not specifying to your host that you require DIFFERENT CLASS C IP addresses and are just asking for separate Ip addresses.

      B) You are dealing with a hosting company that has no business being one.
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      • Profile picture of the author Bshellz
        Originally Posted by Mike Anthony View Post

        Build networks and one of the few people that does full mentoring on how to build them. You've been told the truth by those telling you that you have not been given more than two class C Ips. One of two things is happening-

        A) you are not specifying to your host that you require DIFFERENT CLASS C IP addresses and are just asking for separate Ip addresses.

        B) You are dealing with a hosting company that has no business being one.
        Mike hit it right on the head. You cant get any clearer or simpler than what Mike said.
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        "Being realistic is the most commonly traveled road to mediocrity"
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  • Profile picture of the author UMS
    There's a lot of confusion and some misunderstanding in this thread, so time for an Internet history lesson......

    I'll try to keep things as non-technical as possible.

    Originally when the IP addressing scheme was devised, it was broken into three different classes, A, B & C

    With a Class A network, you could assign 16,777,216 individual IP addresses within each class A network (of which there were only 128).

    Class A network ranges were assigned to big companies like IBM.

    Class B had more networks (16,384) and each of these Class B networks had 65,536 IP addresses.

    Class C had (2,097,152) class C networks with each network having 256 IP addresses.

    This was all well and good in the early days of the Internet and companies that needed more IP addresses than a Class C provided, could quite easily get a class B network range.

    The problem is that was a very wasteful practice, because if a company only used a small fraction of their total IP addresses in their allocated network range, it meant they weren't available for anyone else to use.

    With the explosion of the growth of the Internet, there was a desperate need for more IP addresses.

    In 1993, Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) was introduced to alleviate the issue of IP address shortage.

    Simply put CIDR allowed the old Class A,B,C network ranges to be split into much smaller chunks so that more IP addresses were available for use.

    These days, it doesn't really make much sense to talk about Class A,B or C address ranges as they don't really exist anymore.

    So in answer to the OP's question, the IP addresses you were given are within the original Class A address range.

    The most important question is how many different networks those addresses belong to and that entirely depends on how those address ranges are split up.
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    • Profile picture of the author Bshellz
      Originally Posted by UMS View Post

      There's a lot of confusion and some misunderstanding in this thread, so time for an Internet history lesson......

      I'll try to keep things as non-technical as possible.

      Originally when the IP addressing scheme was devised, it was broken into three different classes, A, B & C

      With a Class A network, you could assign 16,777,216 individual IP addresses within each class A network (of which there were only 128).

      Class A network ranges were assigned to big companies like IBM.

      Class B had more networks (16,384) and each of these Class B networks had 65,536 IP addresses.

      Class C had (2,097,152) class C networks with each network having 256 IP addresses.

      This was all well and good in the early days of the Internet and companies that needed more IP addresses than a Class C provided, could quite easily get a class B network range.

      The problem is that was a very wasteful practice, because if a company only used a small fraction of their total IP addresses in their allocated network range, it meant they weren't available for anyone else to use.

      With the explosion of the growth of the Internet, there was a desperate need for more IP addresses.

      In 1993, Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) was introduced to alleviate the issue of IP address shortage.

      Simply put CIDR allowed the old Class A,B,C network ranges to be split into much smaller chunks so that more IP addresses were available for use.

      These days, it doesn't really make much sense to talk about Class A,B or C address ranges as they don't really exist anymore.

      So in answer to the OP's question, the IP addresses you were given are within the original Class A address range.

      The most important question is how many different networks those addresses belong to and that entirely depends on how those address ranges are split up.
      Hence the birth of IPv6 which is still in its early stages but alot of big companies are moving towards IPv6 addresses and running dual stack with IPv4 addresses. Hopefully I am not getting too technical lol. Good history lesson though!
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      "Being realistic is the most commonly traveled road to mediocrity"
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      • Profile picture of the author Mike Anthony
        Guys getting WAAY to technical in those last responses. You are going to confuse the life out of the guy. Bottom line is he wants a minimum of different class C IP addresses for SEO purposes and his hosts has NOT delivered that
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  • Profile picture of the author sjollyroger
    tim is right
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  • Profile picture of the author talking
    If oyu need different C class IP addresses, you need to use SEO services which are provided by some companies - seohosting, aseohosting, etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author warrich
    Problem Solved get 200 Unique cc las ips from new host

    Thans All of you
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  • Profile picture of the author rgb
    If you are planing to build a network of sites:

    1. Never interlink them (I know you might be tempted)
    2. There is NO good reason not to chose 4-5 different hosts, so you name servers are different as well (DNS)
    3. I would even go with different who is

    Then you are can worry less about them being spotted as a group if that is you worry.

    And I see that you are selling link services - then dont use google analytics or any other google services.

    Good Luck
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