16 replies
Do you think the design of this letter takes away from the message or enhances it? I'm only asking about the design. Curious about how much "pretty" comes into play in conversions. I have always used a more "traditional" (boring graphic wise) type of letter.

Metabolic Aftershock - Letter

This isn't my page - just something I came across.

Thanks.
Mark
#letters #pretty #sales
  • Profile picture of the author kursat
    I think everyone is different in the way they read the Sales Letters. Some people love the visual designs and not even read a word of the sales copy and just either buy it or bookmark it.

    For me I like to read what the offer is and since I am a web designer, graphics are part of my work so also have a look at what they have done i.e use consistent colors, buying graphics etc. If I was the client than I will have to say a mixture of both works for me.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
      Design elements should 1) support the points being made in the text and 2) enhance readability.

      If you have any questions about a specific design element in the sales letter, please ask.

      Interestingly, the sales letter has no buy button.

      Alex
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      • Profile picture of the author Matt James
        I can tell you the somewhat ugly design on that page enhances conversions.

        Generally, the success of your design depends on your market and what your competitors are up to. In other words, can you model what's working right now conversion-wise (in your specific market) AND make yourself stand out at the same time?
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      • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
        Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

        Interestingly, the sales letter has no buy button.
        It does have a way to buy however....

        ...with a scarcity countdown.

        I was expecting a Clickbank order page.
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      • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
        Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

        Design elements should 1) support the points being made in the text and 2) enhance readability.

        If you have any questions about a specific design element in the sales letter, please ask.

        Interestingly, the sales letter has no buy button.

        Alex
        Like Alex said... great design plays an important role in copy.... but it's almost a silent role.

        It's meant to boost the likelihood of the sales message being absorbed. It's doing it's job if the sales message is seen and absorbed right away.

        It's probably as important, in some regards, to the copy in it's own unique way... because if the design is horrific and drives people away from staying long enough to absorb the copy, it's as important as the copy because it made it so people didn't stay long enough to read or see the copy.

        For some reason, I always like to think of design as the other band members who help the lead singer stand out, or maybe a supporting cast in a movie, that makes the star shine, or maybe even the defense who plays stellar behind a great baseball pitcher.

        Take a look at these pages, and see how layout and design really isn't noticeable... and push the copy to the forefront... hence doing what Alex said... increasing readability...

        Crackerjack Selling Secrets

        LunaFlex PM
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Singletary
    I deleted the affiliate link of the guy that sent this to me on the end of the URL so maybe the buy button is only on affiliate pages.

    I agree the design must support the copy. In this case, I was drawn to it because it was different somehow. I've seen colorful designs before but this one stood out to me for some reason or another. But then I'm not a master copywriter and have absolutely no graphical skills so maybe I am way off on my interest.

    Thanks for all the input.

    Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    I don't know the results from this copy but if I were critiquing
    the page I would get rid of the yellow border and SIMPLIFY
    the page. It is too pretty, which makes it BUSY and a little
    difficult to read. That is also a lot of copy to sell a $37 product.

    On the other hand, some visitors may get the idea that this must
    be a good product because it is obvious that a lot of work went
    into designing the page.

    -Ray Edwards
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    The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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    • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      I don't know the results from this copy but if I were critiquing
      the page I would get rid of the yellow border and SIMPLIFY
      the page.
      How can you critique a piece if you don't know the results of it?

      Just because every guy at the bar thought he could swing better than Jeter, didn't mean they were worth listening to. Even if they did coach Little League.
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      • Originally Posted by 1Bryan View Post

        How can you critique a piece if you don't know the results of it?

        Just because every guy at the bar thought he could swing better than Jeter, didn't mean they were worth listening to. Even if they did coach Little League.
        Experience, that's how.

        I've only got about 3 years of copywriting experience, but I can look at a letter and put together a strong list of what it's doing well and what it could do better... all based on what I've seen succeed and fail in the past.

        Am I correct 100% of the time? Of course not. But my clients' boosted profits say I'm right a hell of a lot more often than I'm wrong. Because it's not guessing, or a gut feeling - it's predictions based on experience.

        Poke around the forum a little more, and you'll see even the most successful copywriters always include the caveat "I don't know the results" or "I don't know how well it's performing," because you never know when some bizarre technique is going to hit home with a specific market.
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      • Profile picture of the author Raydal
        Originally Posted by 1Bryan View Post

        How can you critique a piece if you don't know the results of it?

        Just because every guy at the bar thought he could swing better than Jeter, didn't mean they were worth listening to. Even if they did coach Little League.
        That's why I gave a qualifier--I don't know the results they are getting.
        It's like saying that a person is overweight even though you never saw
        them on a scale--it's an educated guess.

        -Ray Edwards
        Signature
        The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
    Another thing about design... when there's EVER any question...
    you can almost never go wrong with just being simple, clean, clear, and uncluttered.

    I get a LOT of design questions, and my response is usually the same: just
    make it simple, clean, and easy to read.

    When it doubt, black text, white background, and make it look like an article
    or something you'd see in a newspaper.

    It pisses me off when I get hired to work with bigger companies and one
    of the first things I'll look at is what they spend on particular things.

    Just a few days ago, one marketer I was working with had spent
    close to $5,000 on design and building the site, and saw a payment
    for $300 for copy, to Elance.

    If the list and offer is spot on and well done, the copy should be
    thought of pretty highly and then the design done well enough
    so it makes the copy POP and stand out.

    and yes, I get some markets need a more in-depth and complicated
    design... but not by much.

    Apple.com is pretty darn simple... with black text and white background...
    no real complicated and earth shattering design.

    And last I checked, Apple.com sold a few bucks worth of products here
    and there.

    So when in doubt... just make is simple, clear, and easy to read. This sentence
    is more for the newer writers here... the veterans here most likely already know that.
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  • Gotta say, my eyeballs sure burned off some calories from the visual bombast.

    Way busy for me, but I got the attention span of a gnat.
    Signature

    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff together.

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  • Profile picture of the author EpicContentGuy
    Yikes. I'd like to see the numbers on how this design is performing. I feel like my eyes are constantly being pulled away from the copy and towards the yellow border.
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    • Profile picture of the author Matt James
      Yikes. I'd like to see the numbers on how this design is performing. I feel like my eyes are constantly being pulled away from the copy and towards the yellow border.
      It's fun to read everybody's opinions on the 'visual bombast'. I agree, it's a pretty ugly and overly busy page.

      However, if I remember... the launch pulled in around $1.4 million in the space of 2 weeks. That was almost 2 years ago when it first launched and it's still selling today. I guess ugly works
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      • Originally Posted by Matt James View Post


        However, if I remember... the launch pulled in around $1.4 million in the space of 2 weeks. That was almost 2 years ago when it first launched and it's still selling today. I guess ugly works
        Every tramp can benefit from a suit an' tie.

        Wonder what it's really worth without the psychedelic whiskers?
        Signature

        Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff together.

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  • Profile picture of the author Joan Altz
    The design is good, imo. It serves as a visual guide the entire length of the page for the folks who ignore the details and just want the highlights, and it has all of the details for those who want it.

    I'm not a professional copywriter and have never claimed to be, but just as someone who has seen a lot of this shit, I'd say the design probably works really well for that type of audience.

    Design itself is a message.

    And I think what Ray said is true: "On the other hand, some visitors may get the idea that this must be a good product because it is obvious that a lot of work went into designing the page."

    For me - and again I'm not really looking at it from a copywriting perspective - it felt comfortable viewing it generally. Not so comfortable reading the details (but I'm not his target and not interested).

    Edited to add...If you look at the message, it's the same message as any other similar offer I've ever seen. Nothing new or unique about it at all really. But the design seems to give it a feel of uniqueness. Maybe that is the only way they saw to set themselves apart, who knows.
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