How far do you go to get killer content?

8 replies
When writing for your audience it's always best to directly speak to your key audience.

We need to know their pain points, understand what gets them excited, be aware of key phrases that float their boat and be all across their needs and concerns.

An email came into my inbox today and I wonder if you think this hits the mark or falls flat.

I'd enquired about some design and there was an automated email back, and within the content was the line "we create epic shit".

I am there target audience to a degree, but I thought this content marketing strategy probably was a little off centre.

Does language and the style of writing need to be so killer it kills the content?
#content #killer
  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    Well, since you object and do not buy you're either NOT their target market or they messed up. Either one happens often.

    Or, third alternative: none of the above. They did not mess up, you're their target audience, they understand you; it's just that you can't please everyone in a given group. You, my friend, therefore, are the problem. Will you, please, conform to your group?

    Another alternative: they did stop your shitty thought train with their shitty thought train: they win!

    Originally Posted by SummerDaze View Post

    When writing for your audience it's always best to directly speak to your key audience.

    We need to know their pain points, understand what gets them excited, be aware of key phrases that float their boat and be all across their needs and concerns.

    An email came into my inbox today and I wonder if you think this hits the mark or falls flat.

    I'd enquired about some design and there was an automated email back, and within the content was the line "we create epic shit".

    I am there target audience to a degree, but I thought this content marketing strategy probably was a little off centre.

    Does language and the style of writing need to be so killer it kills the content?
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  • Profile picture of the author manego90
    Yes, writing style and language needs to be great. As a writer I have experience writing blog post and short fictions and when your using words it is key to keep the target audience attention while also providing value to them like information. Design is everything. Your product is going to be judge constantly by the users so don't let weak writing be the weak point. Just like in the marketing mix, price has to match your product, so does the writing and everything else. Be consistent.
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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    Originally Posted by SummerDaze View Post

    Does language and the style of writing need to be so killer it kills the content?
    No, the writing should never call attention to itself. When it does, conversions and consumability suffer.

    That stated, your writing can never be too clear, concise or compelling.
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    • Profile picture of the author manego90
      and your right. It should call attention to the product or service you are providing.
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  • Prolly you jus' gotta open your eyes.

    Present moment always gonna be full to more'n burstin' with thrusta stimulicular content.

    Oh, but what to do next - if only to guarantee shit ain't gonna get any less crap.

    (Prolly if hope got a gimp, inspirational maxims like this gonna be quoted verbatim offa forearms.)

    Thing is, we are content-gorged, sans contentment.

    Future is empty.
    Signature

    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff together.

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  • Profile picture of the author krishnagirl
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
      Originally Posted by krishnagirl View Post

      The fastest and easiest way to get content is on a freelance writing website where you can meet hundreds of freelance writers who will be willing to write blog posts and site content for you per your needs. The biggest advantage of freelance content writing services is that there are really good writers here who will be willing to write flawless articles for you at incredibly affordable prices. The biggest drawback in these sites is finding the right person amidst a very large number of wannabes who will try to trick you into buying their spun articles. Try content mart. They have a hoard of writers who you can talk to and negotiate with. They also have a 100% non-commissioned money back guarantee for clients who are not satisfied with the content they receive. Content mart also has very easy navigability to help you choose the appropriate writer for your task.
      Is the hoard on a shelf or in a storage room? Thanks for the ad which convinces me to SKIP Content Mart as a source of writers, saves me time.

      GordonJ
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      • Profile picture of the author DABK
        On a shelf in a storage room. Hoards of writers can only be safely kept in storage rooms. But you want easy access to them, so you organize them on shelves.

        Someone asks for a writer who can do SEO articles on loose belly flat, the mechanical arm knows where to go, pluck one, bring it to the price discussion. Wants 2 pennies per word? Back to the shelves, pluck another one, till you get the one who accepts 1 penny per word and knows how to loose weight.

        (Cross my heart, I've been on blogs that were all about helping me, the visitor loose weight. One of them even had a sin versa thrown in there. (For the un-initiated: sin versa is the result of combining vice versa and an article spinner.))

        Originally Posted by GordonJ View Post

        Is the hoard on a shelf or in a storage room? Thanks for the ad which convinces me to SKIP Content Mart as a source of writers, saves me time.

        GordonJ
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  • Originally Posted by SummerDaze View Post


    An email came into my inbox today and I wonder if you think this hits the mark or falls flat.

    I'd enquired about some design and there was an automated email back, and within the content was the line "we create epic shit".
    This really depends on the business' brand identity and typical clientele. The idea behind using 'edgy' things like profanity is to show you're hip, cutting edge, risk-taking, 'with it.' Let's say you're a graphic designer and your typical clientele is skateboard companies. This is not a situation where it pays to play it squeaky clean and polite; a little edginess is entirely appropriate.
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