How is it possible to write a sales letter in a week or less?

44 replies
Hey Warriors,

I've seen a lot of copywriters in this forum mention that they can write a sales letter for a brand new client in a week or less (sometimes in just a couple of hours).

This made me wonder: What happened to the weeks of research you have to do (on the company and the industry) in order to write an informed sales letter? Even if you specialize in a specific industry, it still takes more than a week to get to know the client's company, doesn't it?

In my experience, when I go back and look at the assumptions I made about a company during my first week working for them, the assumptions are usually ignorant or flat-out wrong.

Am I missing something?

-Cab
#letter #sales #week #write
  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    Originally Posted by CabTenson View Post

    Hey Warriors,

    I've seen a lot of copywriters in this forum mention that they can write a sales letter for a brand new client in a week or less (sometimes in just a couple of hours).

    This made me wonder: What happened to the weeks of research you have to do (on the company and the industry) in order to write an informed sales letter? Even if you specialize in a specific industry, it still takes more than a week to get to know the client's company, doesn't it?

    In my experience, when I go back and look at the assumptions I made about a company during my first week working for them, the assumptions are usually ignorant or flat-out wrong.

    Am I missing something?

    -Cab
    Maybe they are not including their research time into the writing
    as mentioned. I'm not at the stage of writing a sales letter in
    2 hours, maybe some people can but I know that 90% of my
    time is spent researching and coming up with a hook and
    structure for the letter. I can't do all that in 2 hours.

    So yes, it does take time to write a decent letter.

    -Ray Edwards
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    • Profile picture of the author CabTenson
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      Maybe they are not including their research time into the writing
      as mentioned. I'm not at the stage of writing a sales letter in
      2 hours, maybe some people can but I know that 90% of my
      time is spent researching and coming up with a hook and
      structure for the letter. I can't do all that in 2 hours.

      So yes, it does take time to write a decent letter.

      -Ray Edwards
      Interesting. How long do you typically spend researching if you have a new client in a new industry?
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      • Profile picture of the author Raydal
        Originally Posted by CabTenson View Post

        Interesting. How long do you typically spend researching if you have a new client in a new industry?

        First, I would not take on a job in an area that I have no
        interest or knowledge about. For example, I recently wrote
        for a water softener product. I had no knowledge about
        water softeners, but I hold a B.Sc. in chemistry so I know
        understanding the science behind the product would be
        easy for me. Also since I taught the subject it would be
        easy for me to translate the science into everyday language.

        This took me about two weeks to research and write.

        The internet is a great tool for research and if a client
        provides enough information then this can make research
        even easier. In more competitive markets a LOT of time
        will have to be spent in what your competition is doing
        so you know what's already working or not working as
        the case may be.

        -Ray Edwards
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        • Profile picture of the author arfasaira
          I second Ray here - some copywriters can bat out sales copy in a couple of hours. I'm not one of them.

          If I know the subject like the back of my hand and I have all the information I need to get stuck in, I could write it in a day or two pushed.

          But, for most letters (especially for expensive products), I typically take anywhere between 25-40 hours plus to research and write sales letters.
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          • Profile picture of the author CabTenson
            Originally Posted by arfasaira View Post

            But, for most letters (especially for expensive products), I typically take anywhere between 25-40 hours plus to research and write sales letters.
            That's still impressive.
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        • Profile picture of the author Marci Ann Aurila
          Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

          First, I would not take on a job in an area that I have no
          interest or knowledge about. For example, I recently wrote
          for a water softener product. I had no knowledge about
          water softeners, but I hold a B.Sc. in chemistry so I know
          understanding the science behind the product would be
          easy for me. Also since I taught the subject it would be
          easy for me to translate the science into everyday language.

          This took me about two weeks to research and write.

          The internet is a great tool for research and if a client
          provides enough information then this can make research
          even easier. In more competitive markets a LOT of time
          will have to be spent in what your competition is doing
          so you know what's already working or not working as
          the case may be.

          -Ray Edwards
          This makes sense. I have a slight science and therapy background and find it MUCH easier to write sales copy for something I know at least a portion of.

          Or at least have an interest in. Depending on whether it is an interest based (with no real knowledge but at least I have a curiosity about it) or if I have knowledge, I can take from 1-2 weeks to both research AND write.

          I find it harder to write copy for someone else (i.e. a client) than for my own sales pages. If I can get into the mode of 'this is mine' it goes much smoother.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andrew Gould
    The copywriting market's just like any other market.

    Not everyone has a budget that can stretch to hiring someone for "weeks of research".
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    When I work with someone in a long-term relationship and help them become the leader in their market, it gets easier and easier to write their copy.

    Some of my client relationships are over two years old.

    There are instances when I write for them that I can knock a piece out in 10 minutes.

    Whereas...

    ...If I had just started writing for them, I would spend hours of research time and creative-pondering.

    Presently...

    I'm working on three sales letters.

    And I would NOT send them to market until I've had time to reflect on them and make the revisions I KNOW will help them convert better.

    Remember...

    When you're crafting a sales letter, it's about making absolute certain that your copy resonates with the audience you're selling to.

    From my perspective, if you don't take your time constructing, organization and infusing your latest epiphany into the copy, you're very likely short-changing the client (and yourself.)

    That being said...

    I've hit a sales letter out of the park in a day.

    It's just not commonplace... for me.

    Mark Pescetti

    P.S. I know that the mentality is "the sooner, the better." But it shouldn't be. The focus should always and ONLY be on making sure you're hitting all the right triggers and making the offer compelling so that massive action is ensured!
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    • Profile picture of the author CabTenson
      Originally Posted by Reflection Marketing View Post

      P.S. I know that the mentality is "the sooner, the better." But it shouldn't be. The focus should always and ONLY be on making sure you're hitting all the right triggers and making the offer compelling so that massive action is ensured!
      I'd be interested in hearing how you sell the slower writing process to clients.
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      • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
        Originally Posted by CabTenson View Post

        I'd be interested in hearing how you sell the slower writing process to clients.
        Two of the sales letters I'm working are long form pieces.

        I got both of them written in a week.

        There's still work to be done.

        I'm not saying it takes me a month to write a sales letter.

        Because it doesn't

        My point for responding in this thread is...

        Copywriting is an investment.

        You want the investment to provide you with passive income for years to come, right?

        If a client is so short-sighted to say, "I want a sales letter in a week... or else I'm taking my business elsewhere."

        I'm not going to try and sell him or her anything.

        My response:

        "Good luck."

        Mark Pescetti

        P.S. One of my current clients is a billionaire who isn't exactly an unknown personality. Watching him work has been a pleasure. He and I work in a very similar fashion. In the past week, I've spit out over 20 slogans, a sales letter, created a sub-brand for an information blog we've developed and spent at least 6 hours on Skype with him. A lot can get done in a week, but what facilitates a massive amount productivity isn't even what's being discussed here.
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  • Profile picture of the author newseller
    Banned
    I think that if you can't write it in a week or less either you shouldn't be going after that client or you're doing too much research.
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    • Profile picture of the author CabTenson
      Originally Posted by newseller View Post

      I think that if you can't write it in a week or less either you shouldn't be going after that client or you're doing too much research.
      How so? Didn't it take David Ogilvy 3 weeks to research his famous Rolls-Royce ad? And that ad was only a half-page of writing.
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  • Profile picture of the author BarryADensa
    Baby shoes, never used.

    How's that for a sales letter that took Hemingway less than a minute to write.

    Okay, it wasn't supposed to be a sales letter.

    I read that it took Makepeace 2 hours at the pool to write a sales letter that eventually pulled in millions.

    Familiarity with the subject matter, belief in the product, an understanding of the target market and a great paycheck does wonders for unclogging the pipes and ratcheting up the speed.

    All things are relative. If you have none of the above -- it'll take you forever to write a sales letter. Then again, if you have none of the above, should you even attempt to write a sales letter?
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    • If I was a client I would be a touch concerned if a writer knocked out a letter in 2 hours.

      And a bit worried if they insisted on 200 hours of research.

      And took 3 months to write it

      But I would want the finished “pitch” to be outstanding – and be able to say “F… that is good”

      So… how long should it take?

      Well, there are so many variables – scheduling, awareness of the product/service, getting to know the "audience", talking with the client, crafting the writing and the 27 edits (check everything, again and again see how it can be improved) – so you know you’ve given it your best possible shot.

      My guideline would be 2 – 3 weeks.

      Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author CabTenson
        Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

        27 edits that really have to be done - so you know you've given it your best possible shot.

        My guideline would be 2 - 3 weeks.

        Steve
        Very helpful. I've been curious about the number of drafts/edits the average copywriter has to do.
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        • Profile picture of the author arfasaira
          Originally Posted by CabTenson View Post

          Very helpful. I've been curious about the number of drafts/edits the average copywriter has to do.
          Depends really - I usually nail it first attempt, although I've never had to edit more than twice (and that was because client goofed up with the details they sent me for the product)

          If you've done your research right and you've taken the time to prepare your prep file well, then you shouldn't need loads of edits.
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          • Profile picture of the author CabTenson
            Originally Posted by arfasaira View Post

            Depends really - I usually nail it first attempt, although I've never had to edit more than twice (and that was because client goofed up with the details they sent me for the product)

            If you've done your research right and you've taken the time to prepare your prep file well, then you shouldn't need loads of edits.
            That's not true for me. I suspect I edit and re-write more than average. I figure that if copywriting is as detailed and perfectly honed as people suggest, then it would be hard to nail on the first try unless you've been doing this nonstop for years. But, again, I am not a natural writer. I'm just interested in sales, and know that I'm more skilled at writing than talking.
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            • Profile picture of the author Centurian
              The banquet is set for the guests to enjoy, but the real work is done preparing the feast.

              Sometimes I can labor for days on end. Other times it comes in a single setting.

              It's the hours and years of experience in a particular field of knowledge that produce the real works of genius.
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      • Profile picture of the author camitran1
        Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

        If I was a client I would be a touch concerned if a writer knocked out a letter in 2 hours.

        And a bit worried if they insisted on 200 hours of research.

        And took 3 months to write it

        But I would want the finished "pitch" to be outstanding - and be able to say "F... that is good"

        So... how long should it take?

        Well, there are so many variables - scheduling, awareness of the product/service, getting to know the "audience", talking with the client, crafting the writing and the 27 edits (check everything, again and again see how it can be improved) - so you know you've given it your best possible shot.

        My guideline would be 2 - 3 weeks.

        Steve
        That's right. A research need long time more than a week to gain good result.
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  • Profile picture of the author David Mcalorum
    The fastest I ever did one was in about 35 minutes.
    that particular product has done well over five figures and continues to sell.

    Now mind you
    a) I knew the product like the back of my hand (it was mine)
    and
    b) I used dragon naturally speaking
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  • Profile picture of the author BarryADensa
    BTW, I've written sales letters in less than a day, because I had "all of the above" mentioned above.

    But the client would never know that.

    I normally quote a minimum turnaround of two weeks on any project, unless it's for one of my retainer clients. But even for them it's never the same day, even if it only takes me a few hours (unless it's a bonafide emergency).

    The project pipeline also plays a huge role, too. The most I've ever been backed up is 3 months. So even if I could write a letter in an hour -- it would take me 2 months to get to it.

    Like I said above, everything is relative.

    Besides, one should always let the copy marinate, at least over night -- you'd be amazed how much you can tweak copy for the better after a good night's sleep.
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  • Profile picture of the author ThomasOMalley
    If a copywriter is getting paid a reasonable amount of money, then a copywriter will spend the required time to do a good research job and write the copy accordingly.

    If a copywriter is not getting paid much, I doubt much research is done.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
      Originally Posted by ThomasOMalley View Post

      If a copywriter is getting paid a reasonable amount of money, then a copywriter will spend the required time to do a good research job and write the copy accordingly.

      If a copywriter is not getting paid much, I doubt much research is done.
      Exactly.

      Amen brother!

      Of course, reasonable is a matter of personal opinion.

      Some copywriters will get excited for $2000...

      ...While others won't even turn on their computer for less than $10,000.

      I'm somewhere in the middle.

      The bottom line is...

      The "exchange of energy" as I call it must be equal.

      Mark Pescetti
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  • Profile picture of the author BlackMetal
    Originally Posted by CabTenson View Post

    Hey Warriors,

    I've seen a lot of copywriters in this forum mention that they can write a sales letter for a brand new client in a week or less (sometimes in just a couple of hours).

    This made me wonder: What happened to the weeks of research you have to do (on the company and the industry) in order to write an informed sales letter? Even if you specialize in a specific industry, it still takes more than a week to get to know the client's company, doesn't it?

    In my experience, when I go back and look at the assumptions I made about a company during my first week working for them, the assumptions are usually ignorant or flat-out wrong.

    Am I missing something?

    -Cab
    How is it not possible is the question you should be asking
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  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    It all depends on how you manage your time and your energy. I've written entire books in just a few weeks and entire sales pages and brochures, long ones, in just a few days.

    The most important part of this for me has been selecting a few niches or industries that I know well and that I'm interested in and writing only for them. When you research and write in the same few niches long enough, you get fast.
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  • Profile picture of the author MBDirect
    How is it possible to write a sales letter in a week or less?

    Simple answer: Betcha it isn't, very often, except for a special few.

    But oh how I wish it were possible for me.

    I don't want to speculate about those who can consistently pull this off. I'll just say it definitely is possible for (1) any professional copywriter who knows the topic by heart or (2) any self-proclaimed "copywriter" who is inexperienced and untrained and turns out crap and has clients that can't tell the difference.

    The fastest I ever wrote a sales letter was two days (what a joy), but I had been writing for that client for years. Otherwise three to four weeks is my range because of what I put into it, and it consistently pays off for the client with better-than-expected results. Including NO changes to Draft One in most cases... a bonus whose value is not recognized by inexperienced clients.

    There's a question about differences in cost to the client in this thread. It assumes slow would cost more than fast. Maybe not. The fast one could easily charge more for the rapid turnaround. Like the nature of the work itself, there are variables.

    Thanks for the irresistible question.

    Best from the one on the left at MBDirect.
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    • Profile picture of the author Harlan
      I wrote the sales letter for the Annihilation Method in front of a live seminar in 90 minutes flat.

      It went on the sell about 1.4 million in a few hours.

      It beat out Michel Fortin's Traffic Secrets record for the "million dollar day".

      Of course, the fact that the list was filled with hot horny guys prepared to spend money made it really easy.

      They had never scene a launch before.
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    • Profile picture of the author jessiepadgal
      Originally Posted by MBDirect View Post

      How is it possible to write a sales letter in a week or less?

      Simple answer: Betcha it isn't, very often, except for a special few.

      But oh how I wish it were possible for me.

      I don't want to speculate about those who can consistently pull this off. I'll just say it definitely is possible for (1) any professional copywriter who knows the topic by heart or (2) any self-proclaimed "copywriter" who is inexperienced and untrained and turns out crap and has clients that can't tell the difference.

      Otherwise -- just speaking for myself - to make such a claim I'd have to have developed a "fill in the blanks" formula that I'd use for every job plus a method of rigidly controlling the client and the processes of extracting the information I need from him. (I've seen this done routinely in sales/marketing video production for business and I've seen the pathetic end products). I'd have to cut corners on all dimensions of the research phase - client, industry, problems needing solutions, product, target market and whatever. And I'd have to stop the incessant edit/polish that leads to dozens of drafts before I deliver "Draft One."

      The fastest I ever wrote a sales letter was two days (what a joy), but I had been writing for that client for years. Otherwise three to four weeks is my range because of what I put into it, and it consistently pays off for the client with better-than-expected results. Including NO changes to Draft One in most cases... a bonus whose value is not recognized by inexperienced clients.

      There's a question about differences in cost to the client in this thread. It assumes slow would cost more than fast. Maybe not. The fast one could easily charge more for the rapid turnaround. Like the nature of the work itself, there are variables.

      Thanks for the irresistible question.

      Best from the one on the left at MBDirect.
      I second this. Copywriting is something that doesn't just pop outta thin air...I've spent 2+ weeks just doing research for industries I know intimately to make sure I get all my stuff straight.

      I bet the overnight copywriters aren't taking the time to do interviews...actual customer feedback can be so important I would try to stay away from possible hacks.

      That being said, the more you write copy, the faster you get.
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  • Profile picture of the author Robert_Rand
    Originally Posted by CabTenson View Post

    How is it possible to write a sales letter in a week or less?
    I think the biggest key is your attitude and what you think is possible. What you think is protocol and what kind of limiting beliefs you're willing to break through.

    Sylvester Stallone wrote the screenplay to Rocky in a couple of days. Yeah, he knew the subject matter, but I'd say writing a salesletter, even in an area you're not familiar with, is infinitely easier. Sales is sales.
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    • Profile picture of the author CabTenson
      Originally Posted by Robert_Rand View Post

      I think the biggest key is your attitude and what you think is possible. What you think is protocol and what kind of limiting beliefs you're willing to break through.

      Sylvester Stallone wrote the screenplay to Rocky in a couple of days. Yeah, he knew the subject matter, but I'd say writing a salesletter, even in an area you're not familiar with, is infinitely easier. Sales is sales.
      This is the only response I don't understand. The days or weeks of research it takes to get to know a new product or industry is not a "limiting belief". It's not something that Negative Nancys just make up in their heads.

      And a screenplay written for yourself is not the same as writing a sales letter for a new client. In one circumstance you hold all the info ahead of time. In the other, you have to get to know someone else and their product.
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  • It takes as long as it takes.

    That's all there is to it. You can't sit there and say "Right, every project I do from here-on out will take precisely 4 weeks".

    It just isn't realistic. Things take as long as they need. No more, no less. Some projects take hours, some days, and some weeks.

    Like others have said, a lot depends on...

    -Pre-existing knowledge of the niche/company etc
    -Past history with the client
    -Whether you've worked towards selling products towards the same target audience

    And so on. Also, some people are naturally gifted at this kinda thing, and can write sales letters in a day. Just how it is!


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  • Profile picture of the author kaaregarnes
    The hard part is creating the outline or the concept, but sometimes it just clicks and you can do everything in an hour.And often the best way is to do it quickly - get feedback - and optimize.

    but real creative takes time
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    • Profile picture of the author CabTenson
      Originally Posted by kaaregarnes View Post

      but real creative takes time
      Yeah. I spend a lot of time just thinking about things sometimes.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jordyminty
    If you have a full day or two to devote your time to research and writing, I can not see it taking more than a week to produce a great sales email. If you spend a week or two writing up this long, informative email to a company who already knows what they do... they could overlook it and ignore it leaving you at the drawing board.

    My personal experience always leaves me having to write a few more emails after my initial sales email, in order to nail the sale.... so I don't spend more than a couple of hours (2 days max) on my initial sales email.

    Hope this helps to the TC.
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  • Profile picture of the author maximus242
    I have a lot of skepticism about people who claim to consistently write good copy in a few hours. Sure you may get lucky, but to strike it rich 9 times out of 10, yeah right.

    And if its someone elses money your playing with, thats not cool. Its one thing to screw around with your own money, its another to screw around with someone elses.

    I think anything worth doing is worth doing well, and you should take the time to do things right. To me its total bs about writing a piece of copy in 2 hours unless everything you need has been handed to you on a silver platter.

    Copy gets better with time, like wine. The working and reworking of copy until its pitch perfect is what seperates okay from exceptional. I just see it as a waste of the copywriters talent and a waste of the clients time to churn out something in a few hours. Why not take the time to do something well, just spitting out a first draft and calling it finished is pure laziness to me.

    You can always beat your first ad, you can always make it better. Why settle for mediocre quality? This is what I like about Steve, the dude really forces himself to rewrite and rewrite, that is a winning formula. Never accepting what you first write, and always working on it to make it better until neither you nor anyone else can find a way to strengthen it.

    Then you've done your job right. Just to do editing of the first draft takes at least 2 days because you have to set it aside, forget about it, then go back to it to see your mistakes. Theres no way you could do that in a few hours.

    Gary Halbert once spent 3 weeks working on a single word in a sales letter. One word. He kept going over every possibility until he found something that was just perfect psychologically. Of course he did other things too, but that shows you the kind of dedication he had.
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  • Profile picture of the author virtualconsultant
    Writing a top quality sales letter that converts well, I usually need to invest minimum 5 working days ( that makes a week) for extensive research on the product and its background, features. I always take notes on important points side-by -side while performing research.

    Once the research is done, it is only a matter of 12-14 hours to assimilate all this points properly in a professional format.

    Thanks.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jomuli3
      It is possible to write a sales letter within a week. All is dependent on the Copywriter. Of course the client's deadline must be observed. If you choose and write for one niche you will complete your project within a short time.

      In short I would say completion is dependent on:-

      a) Your deadline ( it could compel you to work a few extra hours)
      b) Familiarity of subject matter
      c) accessibility of research tools and internet connectivity
      d) Passion for the subject matter
      e) your experience as a copywriter

      These are SOME of the factors which could determine how quickly a project could be completed.

      There is no standard time for writing a sales letter.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ross Bowring
    I've written a couple letters for my own wares in a matter of hours/days. That's because I'm coming to these letters "warm" to the details of the client (me) and the product (that I created.)

    But "cold" client letters where those details need to be discovered and "brain-bolted" together into a cohesive pitch are almost always 3 to 4 to 5 week affairs.

    --- Ross
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  • Profile picture of the author Jennie Heckel
    Hi Cab,

    This is what I think... please take it with a grain or maybe a whole bucket of salt!

    You write copy to match and fill the need and it takes as long as it takes.

    I usually write video scripts in 1 day, 1,200 to 1,500 words = 7 minutes of run time, but then I KNOW the subject well. Take a day to let it simmer, then edit it and polish it to fine tune it...so minimum is 3 days for a video script.

    Long form sales letters are a different animal...

    They can not easily be "written off the cuff" like a video script can be.

    So figure at least 2 to 3 days for research (unless it is handed to me). Make sure you have a superior questionaire. Send the questionaire to the client and get them to fill it out in detail.

    My sales letters for Clickbank run a couple of days, mostly time to review the product use it and then write my own thoughts of why it is great and why they NEED/WANT it EMOTIONALLY -- NOT logically.

    I do my best to write the copy using the underlying reasons why they buy (not the obvious benefit oriented ones.) I do my best to sell it -- with a softer sell using NLP and subliminal copywriting following what Harland Kilstein teaches. I have several of his courses and I highly recommend them.

    If your questionaire is killer (like mine is), it almost writes the sales letter in rough form all by itself.

    My questionaire asks many of the "need-to-know questions" and uncovers many hidden "hot buttons" that push the visitor to buy. This helps uncover the reason behind the reason they would want to buy -- not logical reasons but deeply emotional reasons. Many times having the client write in depth about their product and the reasons why THEY thing it would sell reveals hot buttons I had not even thought of.

    It is best the client fills in the answers and then you print it out and go over the answers on the phone or skype to make sure you are clear on any details.

    The reason why you do it this way is the client has a very intimate contact with the product. They live and breathe it. So they will know it 100 times better than you can even with days (or weeks) of research.

    Some clients don't like filling out questionaires, but I just tell them this:
    "The better you fill out the questionaire and completely answer the questions, the higher will be your final conversions..."

    That usually is a big enough push to get them to do a good job filling it out.

    They get to really think about how to sell the product -- via the visitor's eyes.

    This focuses not so much on the fact that "my product is a great product and I love it so the visitor should too". But rather gets them to think outside the box as to the underlying reasons why a visitor would buy. This helps dig up a better hook than the obvious ones that have been used over and over.

    So take the time to create a great questionaire, and then use it.

    Take the time to discuss the questionaire results with your client and it will be worth the time to do it.

    As far as how long it takes to write a sales letter it just depends.

    On how well you...

    1. Know the subject matter
    2. How experienced a writer you are
    3. The length of the copy that needs to be written
    4. How much research you feel you need to know the subject well enough to write about it confidently. Remember you can over do research so don't get caught in that trap! Too much research can numb your mind and confuse you.
    5. How much you are paid

    Good luck writing!

    Jennie
    Signature
    ******* WSO & JV ZOO COPYWRITER -- VLS & SALES LETTERS PROVEN TO CONVERT ******* Get Higher Profits From Launches That SELL! Proven Copywriter with 17 Years of Copywriting Experience. Contact Me Via Skype: seoexpertconsulting Copywriting Website: http://www.VideoScriptCopywriter.com

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    • Profile picture of the author CabTenson
      Originally Posted by Jennie Heckel View Post

      Good luck writing!

      Jennie
      Thank you Jennie. Great post!

      -Cab
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  • Profile picture of the author rosemarry1112
    1. What are the three most important ingredients of a sales letter?

    2. How can I boost my credibility in the letter?

    3. When should I personalize a letter?

    4. Do I need an order form?

    5. Is there anything else that boosts response?
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  • Profile picture of the author nik0
    Banned
    No wonder my sales letter written in 15minutes isn't converting, 2 weeks research really?
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  • Profile picture of the author MBDirect
    A-hem...
    Received in the mail...
    Not about sales letters but writing is writing...

    “The highest-earning self-publishing authors write 31% more words per day than their less successful self-published colleagues, but they spend 62% more time doing it. This translates to spending 24% more time per word.” — data from the Taleist Self-Publishing Survey

    MBDirect
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  • Profile picture of the author knish
    Read books, course, newsletter on writing. Then work hard, write everyday, and find a master critique when possible.
    Just remember, there is only a way to achieve your goal: "PRACTICE, PRACTICE, AND FINALLY, PRACTICE".
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