Convincing People To Buy

27 replies
Hi

I am struggling to decide exactly how I am going to convince people to buy my product. I feel I have so many selling points but at the same time I don't want to bombard people when you probably only have a matter of seconds to get people hooked when they land on your site.


I was wondering if any of you have a template you work towards to get your points across in a sales style that get a results?

I believe a good sales pitch is a psychological technique that can be learned and I could do with some tips to focus my thinking.

Thank you
#buy #convincing #people
  • Profile picture of the author RichardF
    Sounds to me like you're over-thinking this. Stop worrying so much about hooking visitors in "seconds", and just try to focus on delivering the main benefits of your product in the best way you can. A good technique IMO is writing down any questions/doubts potential customers may have, and then respond to each in a clear and concise manner, starting with the most severe.

    I'm sure there are many good examples in the copywriting forum. Also, if you REALLY want to learn something, go pick up the book Cashvertising. It's so good, I come back to it again and again. Best investment ever.
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  • Profile picture of the author LiftMyRank
    Look back at stuff you've bought yourself, and try and figure out what exactly made you buy that stuff, then use the exact same things in your own copy..
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  • Profile picture of the author imogenhobbs
    Originally Posted by Tommyg123 View Post

    Hi

    I am struggling to decide exactly how I am going to convince people to buy my product. I feel I have so many selling points but at the same time I don't want to bombard people when you probably only have a matter of seconds to get people hooked when they land on your site.


    I was wondering if any of you have a template you work towards to get your points across in a sales style that get a results?

    I believe a good sales pitch is a psychological technique that can be learned and I could do with some tips to focus my thinking.

    Thank you
    I highly recommend Fast Effective Copy and Cult of Copy. Or head over to the Copywriting forum on the WF for recommended resources on how to write a salesletter /video script.

    Basically any good sales pitch is this: Telling the prospect about her urgent problem accurately (gaining rapport), telling her that her problem can be solved and then telling her the method to get there.

    Presentation-wise, that's where everything else comes in. Get good proof, a good offer, a good proposition, a good guarantee, a good promise and you're good to go.

    Imogen
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  • Profile picture of the author Samuel Adams
    What's the biggest/best reason a potential buyer should own the product? Will it save that person time/money/energy/frustration/embarrassment? Pick the best benefit and use that as your headline and main paragraph in the sales copy and focus on that.
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  • Profile picture of the author jaggyjay
    Hi Tommy,

    You have legitimate concerns. Let me make it easier for you...

    Use your Headline to "hook" your readers. Writing a "Benefit-Driven" one is a good way to start. Now, you're naturally not going to please everyone - so don't worry about the ones that don't get "hooked" after the standard + or - 6 seconds you've got. Focus on the ones that stay to read more.

    Use your first sentence or paragraph (also called the "lead-in sentence/paragraph") to make your readers a promise... example: "I'm about to reveal to you the exact steps I used to get dates with 3 Miss USA Beauty Pageant winners"

    I'm sure you get the idea.

    Be sure to deliver on your promise... but not right away, of course. This encourages your readers to read more.

    Feel free to list all the benefits your product or service has to offer. Use bullet points. And list them in order of most appealing.

    Now, once you finish your sales copy, go ahead and review it. Check for wordiness and delete excess words and non-important points.

    That's it.

    Focus. Write. Make Sales. You can do it.

    Peace!
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  • Profile picture of the author master reseller
    In addition to benefits, you should also consider other factors such as why they would want to buy from y our page and not another.

    With so many people offering similar products online, the website visitor might be tempted to shop around on price, so you have to give them a valid reason to buy from you rather than your competitor. Does anyone else offer the product you are offering? Why should the person on your page buy from you, such as what unique benefit are you offering, such as extended warranty or service after the sale, consultation, guarantee, etc? Just a couple things to focus your attention on when creating the main part of your sales page.

    What is your unique selling proposition that is different from the next site selling the same thing?
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  • Profile picture of the author natas105
    When you head out to the copywriting section of this forum, I'm sure you'll find tons of tips that will help you put together an awesome sales page. For now, I would say: focus on the buyer and how fast they will see results. Make sure you capture their attention in less 7 seconds with your headline.

    Also, keep in mind tht facts tell, but stories tell. Make sure you're story stands out. ( the story behind you or the product) What makes you or your product stand out and worth buying? If ou figure that out, you're on your way.
    Good luck!
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    Rather than throwing up a sales letter, hoping to grab their attention and convince them to buy your product in the seconds that you will have to grab their attention, why not build a list and send out a sequence of sales messages and valuable content to gain their trust and attention? It's far easier to sell to an audience that you have a relationship with than someone who is just driving by on the Internet Superhighway.
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    You have been directed to the copywriting forum and this thread
    may be transferred there as well. But here is a list of book to get
    you started. Your question cannot be answered in one post.

    http://www.warriorforum.com/copywrit...ooks-ever.html

    -Ray Edwards
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    The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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  • Profile picture of the author JensSteyaert
    If you're not a good copywriter, and / or don't have the budget to pay for one, then the best thing you can do is write down a list of problems your potential customers might have.

    When you have that list it's a matter of answering these questions with solutions your product will provide.

    It all starts with asking yourself: "Why would people buy my product?"
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  • Profile picture of the author schttrj
    Originally Posted by Tommyg123 View Post

    Hi

    I am struggling to decide exactly how I am going to convince people to buy my product. I feel I have so many selling points but at the same time I don't want to bombard people when you probably only have a matter of seconds to get people hooked when they land on your site.

    I was wondering if any of you have a template you work towards to get your points across in a sales style that get a results?

    I believe a good sales pitch is a psychological technique that can be learned and I could do with some tips to focus my thinking.

    Thank you
    Let's look at it from a different perspective.

    Your customer pays money ONLY in exchange of a BENEFIT.

    So, you sell them a benefit!

    What kind of benefit or value are you giving to your market?

    A better solution that is improved from an existing solution?

    A better solution that is reinvented for the existing problem?

    Whatever the case may be, you are just selling a benefit. And what stands you apart is your unique selling point.

    Why would people buy from you? What's so special about you? In other words, how do you impact their lives better?

    So, think about the benefit, first of all.

    Remember, your benefit is only in the minds of your customers.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    @OP: your problem is right in your thread title.

    And I believe many of the people replying have got it wrong as well.

    You can't convince people to buy.

    You cannot motivate another person. People motivate themselves.

    In sales, you cannot force a prospect to buy.

    Copy IS selling, but in a one-way medium--no dialogue, like television.

    People motivate themselves.

    You can exhaust yourself trying to convince, persuade, bully, beg, exhort, and so on...but it will never work.

    People convince themselves.

    You cannot do that.

    What you CAN do is filter.

    That's what great copy does: filter. Separates non-buyers from buyers. People who were ALREADY motivated to buy your product or service.

    Great copy enters the conversation already going on inside the prospect's mind.

    Great copy picks up the conversation inside the already-convinced prospect's mind and carries it along--sometimes gently and invisibly, when done well, and sometimes jarringly and noticeably, when done inexpertly.

    Great copy takes the reader along a train track known to the buyer and the writer, and notes each signpost as it passes. At every signpost, which is a key reason to buy--a typical serious situation our buyers commonly find themselves in when beginning to look for our solution, a powerful benefit our buyers constantly seek when looking for our solution, a massive problem our buyers have discovered they are plagued by that forced them to realize they needed to start looking for a solution--the reader is filtered, either:

    OUT - not a fit, isn't in that situation, doesn't need that benefit, doesn't have that problem

    or

    IN - is a fit, recognizes that situation, reaches for that benefit, resonates that they have this problem.

    Readers filtered Out go on their merry way.

    Readers filtered In get more involved in the copy as it is speaking directly to them. Faster and faster, like a train picking up speed, as each signpost is passed their interest peaks and the buying intensity climbs. And then--

    --when the prospect is filtered completely In, resonates totally with the situation, benefits and problem, and is BURNING FOR THE SOLUTION they didn't even know they so badly needed when they began reading--

    The BUY NOW button or phone number or address to send the check to is a mere formality, the process steps that need to be completed so our buyer can get out of the desperate situation they now know they are so deeply mired within.

    That is how effective copy works.

    Pushing, pulling, appealing, whining, smashing: these don't work.

    Put the buyer on the train that runs down the track they will already recognize. That they are predisposed to recognize. This is why market research is so important. This is why taking so many hours staring at the ceiling, busting out the door for a walk in frustration, and knowing in your heart with a smile that you finally got the hook right is absolutely necessary.

    Convincing people to buy is an exhausting waste of time.
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    • Profile picture of the author aidacopy
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Convincing people to buy is an exhausting waste of time.
      This!

      Or in Halbert's words, find a starving crowd first. And when you find them, focus on why your product is better than all the other products out there. (Much easier to do when they already want what you're selling.)
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    • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      @OP: your problem is right in your thread title.

      And I believe many of the people replying have got it wrong as well.

      You can't convince people to buy.

      You cannot motivate another person. People motivate themselves.

      In sales, you cannot force a prospect to buy.

      Copy IS selling, but in a one-way medium--no dialogue, like television.

      People motivate themselves.

      You can exhaust yourself trying to convince, persuade, bully, beg, exhort, and so on...but it will never work.

      People convince themselves.

      You cannot do that.

      What you CAN do is filter.

      That's what great copy does: filter. Separates non-buyers from buyers. People who were ALREADY motivated to buy your product or service.

      Great copy enters the conversation already going on inside the prospect's mind.

      Great copy picks up the conversation inside the already-convinced prospect's mind and carries it along--sometimes gently and invisibly, when done well, and sometimes jarringly and noticeably, when done inexpertly.

      Great copy takes the reader along a train track known to the buyer and the writer, and notes each signpost as it passes. At every signpost, which is a key reason to buy--a typical serious situation our buyers commonly find themselves in when beginning to look for our solution, a powerful benefit our buyers constantly seek when looking for our solution, a massive problem our buyers have discovered they are plagued by that forced them to realize they needed to start looking for a solution--the reader is filtered, either:

      OUT - not a fit, isn't in that situation, doesn't need that benefit, doesn't have that problem

      or

      IN - is a fit, recognizes that situation, reaches for that benefit, resonates that they have this problem.

      Readers filtered Out go on their merry way.

      Readers filtered In get more involved in the copy as it is speaking directly to them. Faster and faster, like a train picking up speed, as each signpost is passed their interest peaks and the buying intensity climbs. And then--

      --when the prospect is filtered completely In, resonates totally with the situation, benefits and problem, and is BURNING FOR THE SOLUTION they didn't even know they so badly needed when they began reading--

      The BUY NOW button or phone number or address to send the check to is a mere formality, the process steps that need to be completed so our buyer can get out of the desperate situation they now know they are so deeply mired within.

      That is how effective copy works.

      Pushing, pulling, appealing, whining, smashing: these don't work.

      Put the buyer on the train that runs down the track they will already recognize. That they are predisposed to recognize. This is why market research is so important. This is why taking so many hours staring at the ceiling, busting out the door for a walk in frustration, and knowing in your heart with a smile that you finally got the hook right is absolutely necessary.

      Convincing people to buy is an exhausting waste of time.
      Jason, thank God you showed up on this thread cause I was about to lose my Jesus over some of these responses.

      The convincing vs persuading is spot on.

      People are more easily persuaded by their own ideas than they ever will be by yours. Just think about the last time you had a debate with someone over some ridiculous belief that they refused to let go of. You probably had charts and graphs drawn, the entire company of Supreme Court Justices standing behind you and a an airtight case for your point solid enough to make Johnnie "Friggin'" Cochran leap out of his grave and give you a high five...yet, they remain unconvinced.

      Why?

      Because people are more easily convinced by their own ideas than they ever will be by yours. Even if your idea is ingenious and theirs is dumber than a box of pet rocks.

      It's not any easier to "convince" someone in print. In fact, your chances of winning them over are even slimmer. Thankfully, you don't have to convince them of anything. You simply have to find their deepest desire, stir it up, remove their insecurities and make them feel okay about buying.

      So list your benefits, then pick out the three benefits which:
      1. They're most aware of
      2. Are causing them the most pain

      ...then, pick the ONE benefit which you can reasonably see impacting multiple areas of their life. Next, describe contrasting pain such clear and vivid detail that your reader says: "Wow, this person understands me!"

      Then, go from there (yes, there's more, but this is where you need to start).

      Remember, your reader doesn't want your product. They want to enjoy the end result experience of solving their problem and they want to do it without the usual hassles that come with solving it. They want to know that the product will work for them in spite of their secret, irrational fears about why it won't.

      If they could get this from conjuring up a genie and making a wish, they'd just as soon take that route. Again, they just want the problem solved while adding as little complication to their life while doing so. The method is a distant second.

      So start there.

      BTW, in the future, you'll get more specific responses if you give details about what you're selling and how you're currently trying to go about it.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post

        Jason, thank God you showed up on this thread cause I was about to lose my Jesus over some of these responses.

        The convincing vs persuading is spot on.

        People are more easily persuaded by their own ideas than they ever will be by yours. Just think about the last time you had a debate with someone over some ridiculous belief that they refused to let go of. You probably had charts and graphs drawn, the entire company of Supreme Court Justices standing behind you and a an airtight case for your point solid enough to make Johnnie "Friggin'" Cochran leap out of his grave and give you a high five...yet, they remain unconvinced.

        Why?

        Because people are more easily convinced by their own ideas than they ever will be by yours. Even if your idea is ingenious and theirs is dumber than a box of pet rocks.

        It's not any easier to "convince" someone in print. In fact, your chances of winning them over are even slimmer. Thankfully, you don't have to convince them of anything. You simply have to find their deepest desire, stir it up, remove their insecurities and make them feel okay about buying.

        So list your benefits, then pick out the three benefits which:
        1. They're most aware of
        2. Are causing them the most pain

        ...then, pick the ONE benefit which you can reasonably see impacting multiple areas of their life. Next, describe contrasting pain such clear and vivid detail that your reader says: "Wow, this person understands me!"

        Then, go from there (yes, there's more, but this is where you need to start).

        Remember, your reader doesn't want your product. They want to enjoy the end result experience of solving their problem and they want to do it without the usual hassles that come with solving it. They want to know that the product will work for them in spite of their secret, irrational fears about why it won't.

        If they could get this from conjuring up a genie and making a wish, they'd just as soon take that route. Again, they just want the problem solved while adding as little complication to their life while doing so. The method is a distant second.

        So start there.

        BTW, in the future, you'll get more specific responses if you give details about what you're selling and how you're currently trying to go about it.
        LOL I appreciate that. I spent a good 40 minutes on that post this morning before I had to head out to the tv studio, and thought, "Am I wasting my time? Will this just be inflammatory for most people?"

        Many writers seem to believe copywriting is a technical process. You see this in the "Give me the perfect sales letter template" requests. They get a handle on one or two technical devices and think they know copywriting now.

        I've been studying this stuff since 1994! And I STILL have tons to learn, learning every day! It's always changing...in the technical details. Split test, this or that works better today than yesterday. But that thought process--that doesn't change.
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        • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
          Jason's post is true.

          Try convincing or persuading to change his
          religion.

          Ever tried?

          Try changing the political party one belongs to.

          Has anyone here succeeded?

          Try getting a anti abortionist to be pro abortion?

          Laughable!

          OK, try getting a Greenpeace member to
          go work for BP.

          Again, it ain't going to happen.

          Instead work with your readers existing beliefs, biases and
          whacko thinking.

          The other problem the poster is having, like most sales writers,
          they can't see a sales hook if it was right under
          their nose.

          to help find them, one has to study ads that sold
          and see the patterns which lie hidden to most people.

          The study first of sales in advertising bears more fruit than reading books
          and writing in my opinion.

          Best,
          Ewen
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        • Profile picture of the author BudaBrit
          Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

          LOL I appreciate that. I spent a good 40 minutes on that post this morning before I had to head out to the tv studio, and thought, "Am I wasting my time? Will this just be inflammatory for most people?"

          Many writers seem to believe copywriting is a technical process. You see this in the "Give me the perfect sales letter template" requests. They get a handle on one or two technical devices and think they know copywriting now.

          I've been studying this stuff since 1994! And I STILL have tons to learn, learning every day! It's always changing...in the technical details. Split test, this or that works better today than yesterday. But that thought process--that doesn't change.
          Yet that "technical framework" is still damn useful. Sure, it's more of a loose guide than anything else, but it really helped me to visualize just by seeing what went where on a page. Which gems were necessary and which could I remove...

          Perhaps because I started with writing scripts for telesales, and for that I needed to test, remove chunks, test, remove more chunks, test, remove more chunks, until I was left with a pretty bare bones outline.

          It was that outline that I still keep in mind. Sure, it's slightly different for copy, but the same points still remain.


          Sorry for the tangent: when an idea comes to my mind, it has to go down on paper or screen. It was screen this time.
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          • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
            Originally Posted by BudaBrit View Post

            Yet that "technical framework" is still damn useful. Sure, it's more of a loose guide than anything else, but it really helped me to visualize just by seeing what went where on a page. Which gems were necessary and which could I remove...

            Perhaps because I started with writing scripts for telesales, and for that I needed to test, remove chunks, test, remove more chunks, test, remove more chunks, until I was left with a pretty bare bones outline.

            It was that outline that I still keep in mind. Sure, it's slightly different for copy, but the same points still remain.


            Sorry for the tangent: when an idea comes to my mind, it has to go down on paper or screen. It was screen this time.
            Yeah 'cuz I have no experience with phone scripts

            A consistent process is required there as well. Understanding your prospect's thought process and reproducing it in the order of events on the call.

            But one thing is present in phone conversations that you cannot get in copy: DIALOGUE.

            You have a second, third and perhaps even fourth chance to get the hook right on a phone call because of that one difference.

            People get sales scripts wrong, too. They're not about magic words that cause prospects to drop their wallets. I have to deprogram people from that idea every day. Giving someone the words to read over the phone is not enough. They're about getting into that internal conversation and having the prospect tell themselves what the problem is, and why your solution is best (if it truly is).

            If they say it, it's true. If you say it, you have to defend it.

            True in scripts as well as in copy.
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            • Profile picture of the author BudaBrit
              Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

              Yeah 'cuz I have no experience with phone scripts

              A consistent process is required there as well. Understanding your prospect's thought process and reproducing it in the order of events on the call.

              But one thing is present in phone conversations that you cannot get in copy: DIALOGUE.

              You have a second, third and perhaps even fourth chance to get the hook right on a phone call because of that one difference.

              People get sales scripts wrong, too. They're not about magic words that cause prospects to drop their wallets. I have to deprogram people from that idea every day. Giving someone the words to read over the phone is not enough. They're about getting into that internal conversation and having the prospect tell themselves what the problem is, and why your solution is best (if it truly is).

              If they say it, it's true. If you say it, you have to defend it.

              True in scripts as well as in copy.
              Well sure, I was more expanding on what you said :p
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        • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
          Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

          Many writers seem to believe copywriting is a technical process. You see this in the "Give me the perfect sales letter template" requests. They get a handle on one or two technical devices and think they know copywriting now.

          I've been studying this stuff since 1994! And I STILL have tons to learn, learning every day! It's always changing...in the technical details. Split test, this or that works better today than yesterday. But that thought process--that doesn't change.
          One of my music composition teachers in college said that technique was simply a tool for giving clearer and purer expression to what your intuition already knew.

          I believe that's true in sales writing too. Problem is, most writers never develop their intuitive selling skills. Most of them have never even sold anything in person. They think that if the writing is good, people will buy.

          That's why I'm always saying, it's more about selling than it is about writing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Marvin Johnston
    A book I heard recommended in Doberman Dan's interview with Brian Kurtz is "The Secret of Selling Anything" by Harry Browne. It is kind of an expansion on what Jason and Seth talked about.

    You might find it worth your while to check it out. I did, and it is opening up my mind to new possibilities.

    Marvin
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  • Profile picture of the author grantveronica
    Hi TommyG123!

    Just relax and don't over think about how many seconds you have to tell them everything. You don't have to tell them everything after all. You just have to tell them what they want to know. Think like them. Act like you're the customer who accidentally drops by your site. Which catches your attention within a few seconds? Which ad will make you feel curious and interested? You really have to think about these things but don't overdo it.

    If you don't really have a clue what to do, read good books or online articles about internet advertising. And relax.

    Hope this helps you!
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  • It comes down to this, imagine you are the Count of Monte Christo and your boat is about to get sunk and you pull up to a ship with people on it (200+) they ask for money you have 100M in gold what they want is your copy for a deal you say something like I'll give you 80M for ride you get in. They want a killer deal that is what you need to coney, the perception of it. People are not happy with a kilo of gold for the price of half a kilo to them that is for looser they are not a looser in their mind, so you need to prove to them they are getting a kilo of gold for 1/3rd and the 1/2 is for sucker who they are not. Get it?
    Signature
    soon people... Relax...
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    • Profile picture of the author Jomuli3
      Like Jason has pointed out, your first problem lies in the thread title.

      What is exactly wrong with the title?

      Look at the oxford dictionary definitions below?

      To convince - 'to cause to believe firmly in the truth of something.'

      To persuade - 'to induce someone to do something through reasoning or argument.'

      Which one is appropriate convince or persuade?


      For the rest of your concerns, you should take up a copywriting course. This could help you know how to hook prospects within reasonable time.

      I wouldn't recommend a template. It will not give you enough information to understand how various elements of copywriting work.
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  • Profile picture of the author gregw
    I ran across this. This is not specifically directed at copywriting, but you may find it worth a read. "How to Persuade People Who Don't Want to be Persuaded", by Joel Bauer & Mark Levy, Published by John Wiley & Sons

    Also when you say, "convince people to buy my product", to me it presupposes that these people don't want to buy your product. So you set up an adversarial relationship with your reader from the beginning. I think your readers will either consciously or unconsciously be aware of this.

    Just a thought, but you might consider presuming or presupposing that your readers are predisposed to buying your product. And so, write about the things they will experience once/after/when they order/receive/use your product. As has been pointed out elsewhere, "the benefits" they find themselves enjoying. Through your copy, place them in the position of using and enjoying and experiencing the benefits of your product.
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  • There have been like... thousands of books written on the topic of "convincing people to buy."

    It's not something you can just cover in a forum post.

    Cialdini's book Persuasion covers a lot of the most important points.

    AWAI's Six Figure Copywriting Course covers a lot of the most important ideas as applied to copywriting specifically.

    IF you want *my* thoughts on this subject, I'd say there are three "basic" things that will help you convince people to buy:

    1. Specifics. Use specific numbers and stats. Use pictures. Make what you're selling seem "real," not vague.

    2. Clarity. Don't ramble or be wordy. Write "direct and to the point." Make sure the exact meaning of every sentence is crystal clear.

    3. Emotional language. Good copy always has a certain "energy" to it. This is different from niche to niche but you get a feel for it. A lot of Forex copy has that "doomsday sky is falling next big recession" tone going on, for example. Bodybuilding copy usually has that "get bigger, stronger better BRAAAAH" tone going on. Every niche has some kind of emotional tone that tends to resonate with the people who are most likely to buy.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jomuli3
      This thread has been hanging here for exactly two weeks now.

      It has 783 views.

      It has an average of about 55 views per day.

      Quite a big number!

      Surprisingly, despite having glaring misconceptions in some posts, little effort is made to correct them.

      Caution!

      My quick Google search on 'Convincing people to Buy,' which is the title of this thread, shows that it appears as #9 on page 2 among similar searches. All those contributions you have made are there.

      This implies that whatever you write and goes to a web page is 'food' for the whole world not 'Warrior forum' alone.

      The beauty of this is that you market yourself to the entire world through your contributions to threads. Non-forum members can get to you and offer you some work through Google search engine, among others.

      This means we must be careful about what we write. We should be careful of what we support --- it could tarnish our images irreparably, to some extent by those who have been reading your threads/posts.

      That said; let us turn our attention to my areas of concern.

      1) 'You can't convince people to buy'

      In other words it's impossible to convince people to buy.

      Is it true?

      Let us debunk this misconception

      Convince - means 'make someone or yourself believe that something is true.'(Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary.)

      This means ---

      We can talk to ourselves --- and convince ourselves.

      Secondly ---

      We can talk to other people and by using facts and experiences convince them --- make them change their minds/conceptions/beliefs.

      In the first half of a sales letter we relate to our prospects by showing them that we understand their problems.


      Paint a picture of them facing their dreadful problem. Arouse their emotions as you do so. Agitate them lightly. Quickly promise them there is a solution.

      To convince people to change their religious belief, I know, could be difficult but it has worked in some cases depending upon the effectiveness of the education you give them and how deeply rooted their belief is.

      Educate them but don't spend much time.

      Another proof ---

      Do Google search---

      'How to convince people to buy'

      You will find the 14 100 000 results when you key-in the above title. You get 23 700 000 when you use keyword 'convince.' These millions of results indicate that there are many people who believe that we can convince other people and so do I.

      This is just a tip of the iceberg.

      2) 'You can exhaust yourself trying to convince, persuade, bully --- but it will NEVER work.'

      On the contrary ---

      Persuasion works. Look at my quick Google search using keyword 'persuade.'

      I have found 8 650 000 results.

      People can persuade one another to do what they want.

      Let us dig deeper ---

      What does the Oxford dictionary say?

      Persuade - 'To make somebody do something by giving good reasons for doing it.'

      What does the world's greatest copywriter say about persuasion?

      He has given the whole process --- from the attention-grabbing headline down to the sales proposition, the name --- 'Persuasion Equation --- the very blue print of his copywriting success.'

      Denying the stark naked fact that persuasion works --- the hallmark of copywriting, is talking against this man's over 40 years of copywriting experience and his cherished persuasion equation.

      It is also talking against what his disciples believe about persuasion.

      What has he done in terms of influencing our master copywriters?

      He has influenced minds like Jay Abraham, John Carlton, David Deutsch (superstar copywriter), Gary Halbert (late), Joe Vitale, D. Kennedy, Clayton Makepeace, Superstar Copywriter.

      Most of them say he is the greatest living copywriter.

      Here is what Clayton Makepeace says about him.

      'And if our little fraternity held an election today (he not Clayton) would be unanimously elected King. (He) showed us the way, and we worship the ground he walks on,' Clayton Makepeace, Superstar Copywriter and publisher of 'The Total package.'

      I have been his student and I unreservedly believe and endorse what these superstar copywriters are saying.

      My own view point

      1) Why do you write attention-grabbing headlines?
      2) Why do you give prospects a strong promise?
      3) Why do you agitate them?
      4) Why do you educate them?
      5) Why do you show them the benefits?
      6) Why do you use emotions in your sales copy?
      7) Why do you want them to imagine what life could be in two or three years' time if they buy or don't buy your product?
      8) Why do you want to show them that the value they are going to get is far more than the 'cup-of-coffee price' you are offering them?
      9) Why do you write a Post Script (P.S)?

      You want them to buy your product or service. And you know that they won't do so unless you PERSUADE them. The hallmark of effective selling revolves on persuasion.

      Misconceptions or supporting wrong ideas could paint a bad picture of you as a copywriter.

      It's totally unacceptable and inexpressibly impossible to exhume the very foundation on which copywriting rests.

      This is like saying there is no need of 'salesmanship in print.'

      Remember, people don't want to be sold --- but they want to buy.

      How do you compromise the two? --- through persuasion, of course.

      3) 'You cannot motivate another person. People motivate themselves.'

      Our Oxford dictionary says:-

      To motivate - 'To make someone want to do something especially something that involves hard work and effort.'

      Does this mean you cannot motivate another person?

      Far from it.

      Let us share another proof.

      Why do we have many motivation quotes on YouTube?

      What role do motivation quotes play?

      The answer lies in the definition given above.


      The role of motivation is usually put in the last half of a sales letter where you translate features into benefits and press the emotional hot buttons.

      Now let me shade some light on filtering.

      A sales funnel is a metaphoric representation of a 'leaky funnel.' It's a filtering tool of your prospects as they enter your selling process to the time they leave at a certain stage of your copy or until they are converted into buyers if they choose to hang on.

      For various reasons some prospects drop out of the 'leaky' funnel. They might just read your headline, lead, promise, proof, benefits or proposition.

      Your buyers are the ones who reach the end of your sales funnel.

      By removing barriers in your sales funnel, you turn more of your suspects into prospects and prospects into buyers or subscribers. You can deal with this by split testing.
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