by Joe J
25 replies
Hi All,

Does anyone use this method for their lists either alone or with pre-loaded messages?

Letting your list know that once or twice a week that you will be sending them an email with all the latest news that's related to whatever niche your in, summarized in an email for them? If so. what is your frequency or system?

I understand that some niches won't have any real breaking news that warrants a once or twice weekly or even longer than that, email updates for them.

Thanks

Joe
#broadcasts #email
  • Profile picture of the author newxxx
    some people mail daily

    some wekly

    always monetize your mailings
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  • Profile picture of the author Joe J
    Not sure about ALWAYS monetizing but Always link back to site.

    My thinking was summarizing or consolidating the latest news on my site and sending the headlines in an email.

    Also know to test, test and test.

    Thanks for your reply
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    I use auto responders, have moved away from a newsletter as it doesn't vibe with my brand. Focus on sharing value as frequently as possible, push your limits, and rock it out!
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    Ryan Biddulph inspires you to be a successful blogger with his courses, 100 plus eBooks, audio books and blog at Blogging From Paradise
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  • Profile picture of the author Nightengale
    E-mail marketing is a whole subject in and of itself. There's both art and science to it and it helps to have a system.

    Essentially, you should be sending two types of e-mail: promotional and informational. Most e-mail you send should be a mix of both. However, for clarity, it helps to realize there are two types.

    1. Helpful information

    Often, people send an e-mail newsletter (aka "e-zine"). It can be a full-blown newsletter with multiple sections or it can be as simple as a tip of the week. Either way, it's primary purpose is to build a relationship with your subscribers by providing helpful and useful information. You're building trust and positioning yourself as a resource. This relationship is the core of your success.

    And no, it doesn't have to be "breaking news." It can easily be just basic but useful information your audience would find helpful.

    This can be in the form of:

    1. tips
    2. how-to tutorials
    3. news
    4. industry happenings
    5. resources

    ...all related to your topic.

    You can (and SHOULD) include some promotional info in the newsletter/tip/whatever. However, the emphasis will be be on providing useful information.

    2. Promotions

    Now that you're building a solid relationship, it's time to capitalize on it. Send out e-mails specifically and primarily designed to sell. As I said, there's an art to this and is best accomplished through a carefully crafted SEQUENCE of multiple e-mails which include a hard deadline for the offer.

    It's NOT just a one-shot e-mail sent in a "spray and pray" fashion.

    You'll see a lot of complaints here about getting on someone's list and being inundated and overwhelmed with "Buy my stuff! Buy my stuff" type of e-mails. That's because those marketers haven't 1) built a solid relationship by providing useful/helpful info first and 2) they don't create e-mail sequences which educate while they sell.

    I've been on one marketer's list for over a year now and he sends out an e-mail almost every day. They're almost ALL sales e-mails and I never feel irritated or inundated. That is VERY rare in the IM space!

    And it's because he creates sequences AND educates while he sells. I never feel like it's a "Buy my stuff! Buy my stuff" pitch. (It also helps that I like his style and personality. He's outgoing and fun, without being pushy.)

    However, your promotional e-mails will never do very well unless you've built a solid relationship with your audience. And THAT is done with the e-zine.

    See how they work together?

    As for pre-programmed autoresponders vs. broadcast e-mails... It totally depends on what you're doing.

    Program one or two -- or a short sequence -- of pre-written autoresponders to welcome your new subscribers.

    Then send your e-zine and other promotional e-mails via broadcast, depending on your promotional schedule and what you're promoting at that time. Your audience needs to hear from you AT LEAST once a week. Too many other competitors are vying for your audience's attention. You need to capture their attention and create "top of mind" awareness for your products/services.

    So a good rule of thumb is to send one e-zine/tip a week and one promotional sequence each week. Or do a promotion once every two weeks. But be sure to get your e-zine/tip out at least once a week.

    Simple!

    It's best to offer a low-priced introductory product in that initial sequence for a few reasons:

    1. It sets the expectation that you WILL be pitching stuff for sale. Don't wait until Week 16 to suddenly ("Surprise!") pitch something for sale. It's jarring if you've trained them to expect nothing but freebies and you'll get a lot of complaints and unsubscribes.

    2. You EXPECT them to buy. 'Nuff said.

    3. You welcome them with some type of "new subscriber" special offer. However, "introductory" and "low-priced" are relative terms. If your primary offerings are priced around $100, you might offer something for $7 or $20. If your primary offerings are priced around $500 or $1,000, you might offer something for $47 or $97.

    Just make sure it makes sense for your business and audience. If you're selling B2B info for around $1,000, your audience is going to "smell a scam" if you offer them something for $7. Pricing too low CAN hurt you in some cases.

    Also, you MUST have price integrity with this. If you play games with prices and people can get it regularly or often at the "special" price, you'll sabotage your results with this.

    4. An immediate, but low-priced offer helps break the "new customer" barrier. Once they've bought from you once and you delivered a good product/service AND a good experience, it will be MUCH easier for them to buy that $500 product from you.

    If you need help crafting e-mail sequences that sell, check out Ben Adkins' Followup Master Plan (aka FUMP): Followup Master Plan

    I have it, love it and highly recommend it. FUMP gives you complete e-mail sequences for common scenarios in IM:

    1. Warming up and training brand new subscribers to buy from you almost immediately. Yay!

    2. Reactivating your existing, "dead" list. (I've certainly let my own list go dormant -- Shame on me! -- and was very happy to see this.) Yay!

    3. Selling local, offline services. Many people in the IM space are eager to sell their skills to local businesses. This sequence shows you exactly how to structure an e-mail sequence designed to drive foot traffic into a local business. Yay!

    4. Training freebie seekers to buy. How many Warriors complain about building a list of people who apparently come only for the freebie but won't buy?? This sequence shows you exactly how to train those freebie seekers to buy. Yay!

    And I can't remember the other one.

    If you're selling physical products (like on eBay or Amazon) and competing with hundreds or thousands of people selling the exact same thing, check out "FUMP: eCommerce Edition": Followup Master Plan: eCommerce Edition

    (Hint: he JUST released "FUMP: eCommerce Edition" yesterday and it's priced super-low. If you're even thinking about it, get it NOW! The price WILL go up. Ben has a lot of integrity with his prices and when a special price is over, it's OVER.)

    In both editions, Ben talks about the psychology behind each scenario and sequence. So you not only have one complete campaign done for you for each scenario, you'll know the psychology and timing behind each so you can model them and write your own going forward.

    Ben is the guy I was talking about earlier and he gets me with this stuff. I've bought several things from him in the past year.

    If you only just get that initial sequence with the introductory offer programmed into your autoresponder and start getting some sales, you'll be a LOT more excited to go out and write articles and build your list because you'll KNOW exactly what to say to each new subscriber. And you'll know that if you get X subscribers, you'll make X sales.

    Fun!

    I've been tremendously impressed with what Ben does and how he does it. His e-mail training is truly some of the best stuff I've ever seen on the topic. And I've been around the IM space for a LONG time.

    Hope that helps!

    Michelle
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  • Profile picture of the author Joe J
    Michelle,

    Awesome! What a great answer to see first thing in the morning! I'm pretty sure I'll be reading your reply a few more times as I'm preparing some more emails or, Newsletters!

    I will definitely be lookinh into Ben Adkins' offerings when I get home from work tonight.

    I really appreciate the time you spent to leave a detailed answer to my question.

    I can't wait to check out your recommendations, and your other posts now that I see you have some great insight to keeping your emails fresh and full of valuable information, as I get what your saying as I look forward to a couple of people's emails that I receive regularly.

    Have a great day , Joe
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by Joe J View Post

    Does anyone use this method for their lists either alone or with pre-loaded messages?
    Huge numbers of people do this.

    I don't.

    I think broadcasts are greatly inferior to scheduled autoresponder series emails. I think "not sending unnecessary broadcasts" is one of the very significant things that marketers can learn to do, toward maintaining the long-term value of their lists. I avoid broadcasts whenever possible, for a big variety of reasons.

    The first and most important reason, for me, is ...

    (i) Subscribers in many niches have told me in the past that they don't like "obvious broadcasts" because (a) they interrupt continuity, and (b) they make the sender look more like a marketer and less like a trusted provider of valuable information

    But I have a few other reasons, too ...

    (ii) It's very rare that I want everyone on a list to get the same information at the same time, regardless of how long they've been there and where they are in the series;

    (iii) It interferes with "subscriber expectation". It's really important, when opting people in, to set their expectations, and tell them exactly what they're going to receive and when. This dramatically increases open-rates and click-through rates. Sending "broadcasts" makes that very difficult;

    (iv) To me, it feels like "being in a hurry" and "aiming for quick sales" - exactly the things I like to avoid, because I earn far more in the long run by avoiding that, and by having subscribers who trust and respect the fact that I avoid that.

    For me, the key concept is: interrupting continuity with an obvious promotion of something is really a much bigger deal than many people realise.

    It makes you look desperate to sell, and to many subscribers, understandably, that comes across very negatively and ruins your credibility and their trust.

    In my opinion, the people who imagine that isn't a big deal are typically those to whom open-rates of about 20% are acceptable (:p :rolleyes, perhaps partly because they have little awareness of customer perception of - for example - passing off a commissionable product-launch as "news". (In other words, not being aware of your customers' perspective very much at all!).

    People can easily tell this from whether the continuity of the process has been interrupted, i.e. whether it matches what you told them at the end of the previous message to be "watching out for in the next message, in 5 days' time", or whatever. This is a fundamental part of expectation-setting and continuity-maintenance.

    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6123982
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      I'm usually the first one to scream "it isn't either/or, it's both", but in this case I am going to say it is an either/or, for exactly the reason Alexa mentioned - continuity.

      If I set up a programmed sequence, I usually have a method to my madness. I want readers to go through the steps as I've programmed/tested them, and a broadcast (especially an ad) interrupts that.

      On the other hand, if I'm doing something ephemeral, like a newsletter based on current events or other things that will quickly go stale, I'll go the broadcast route on the schedule I've promised when they subscribed. If I deviate from that, there will be a reason, like a limited offer or such.

      My way of blending the two is to offer (series + trial subscription) like an ecourse/newsletter combo. When someone reaches the end of a course or sequence, they get a choice. Do nothing and get the free trial subscription automatically, or opt out and we go our separate ways. Almost nobody unsubscribes at this point.
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      • Profile picture of the author Joe J
        Thanks for the insight John, I had to look up ephemeral, I had an ideal with your usage but needed to be sure it wasn't some kind of condition or disease, hehehe!

        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        I'm usually the first one to scream "it isn't either/or, it's both", but in this case I am going to say it is an either/or, for exactly the reason Alexa mentioned - continuity.

        If I set up a programmed sequence, I usually have a method to my madness. I want readers to go through the steps as I've programmed/tested them, and a broadcast (especially an ad) interrupts that.

        On the other hand, if I'm doing something ephemeral, like a newsletter based on current events or other things that will quickly go stale, I'll go the broadcast route on the schedule I've promised when they subscribed. If I deviate from that, there will be a reason, like a limited offer or such.

        My way of blending the two is to offer (series + trial subscription) like an ecourse/newsletter combo.


        When someone reaches the end of a course or sequence, they get a choice. Do nothing and get the free trial subscription automatically, or opt out and we go our separate ways. Almost nobody unsubscribes at this point.

        So when you blend the two, may I ask how you set that up? Are they on 2 lists or just the 1?

        Thanks Again for your reply,

        Joe
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        • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
          Banned
          Originally Posted by Joe J View Post

          I had to look up ephemeral, I had an ideal with your usage but needed to be sure it wasn't some kind of condition or disease
          You may just have coined a very valuable and appropriate usage, here, Joe ...

          Ephemeritis: "a condition exemplified by the rapidly declining open-rates and click-through rates characteristically experienced by marketers who have depended primarily on search-engine traffic, done little or nothing to brand themselves, inadequately set their subscribers' expectations, failed to appreciate the significance of a continuity-process, and/or depended too much on the use of broadcasts rather than on autoresponder email series".
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe J
      Thanks for your in-depth reply Alexa.





      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      Huge numbers of people do this.

      I don't.

      I think broadcasts are greatly inferior to scheduled autoresponder series emails. I think "not sending unnecessary broadcasts" is one of the very significant things that marketers can learn to do, toward maintaining the long-term value of their lists. I avoid broadcasts whenever possible, for a big variety of reasons.


      The first and most important reason, for me, is ...

      (i) Subscribers in many niches have told me in the past that they don't like "obvious broadcasts" because (a) they interrupt continuity, and (b) they make the sender look more like a marketer and less like a trusted provider of valuable information

      But I have a few other reasons, too ..........................................



      I was thinking it would be possible to send broadcast emails with the latest news of the industry in a weekly or bi-weekly email after letting them know that they will be receiving them allowing them to see me as the one scouring the news for the latest, relevant info (and summarizing it) that they may be interested in.

      Another approach I'm brainstorming after reading your great reply would be just to include a link back in the responder series emails to the latest news articles on my site. Just let them get accustomed to that.


      Now, also I'm thinking that isn't that what the RSS feed is for? (I never read anything in depth on that option). Is that generally what the RSS is used for? And what percentage of readers would you think actually know about it and use it?
      Also, I'm talking about using it for the diet and exercise niche. Between the 2 subjects and together, there is more than enough info daily to get the readers caught up on.
      I will now also be aware of the disrupting continuity of the process.


      Joe
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  • Profile picture of the author talfighel
    Some marketers mail everyday.

    Some mail every 2 days.

    Some mail 2-3 times per week.

    I see a lot of very successful internet marketers who mail out everyday without stop so something is working for them.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe J
      Originally Posted by talfighel View Post

      Some marketers mail everyday.

      Some mail every 2 days.

      Some mail 2-3 times per week.

      I see a lot of very successful internet marketers who mail out everyday without stop so something is working for them.

      I see a bunch everyday also and it's only a few that I actually read from start to finish but I stay on the others for those few little new marketing ideas (new to me) to look into.

      Thanks.
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  • Profile picture of the author artflair
    After my autoresponder sequence is over (about 3 weeks of daily tips) I mail my lists 2 times a week on average - one time with a promotion, the other time with a new helpful blog post.
    I know that even some of the top marketers are emailing daily and 100% promotions, which is something that I'm not enjoying while being on their lists but I guess everyone has a different style.
    My style works for me
    Cheers!
    Art
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Walker
    Email marketing... Possibly the hardest topic to talk about.
    When to email, what to send out, when to sell, how to build relationship..

    These questions will never be answered with a right or wrong answer. You need to get a goal for the purpose of building your list first then break it down. For example, if you opt into those so called "Guru's list", you will find that you will receive emails everyday with subject lines forcing you to open. Such as Your paypal has been cancelled.

    On the other hand, most bloggers will send their subscribers back to their website to build that relationship etc.

    What I'm trying to say is, there is never a right or wrong answer to email marketing. It all depends on what your goal is.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe J
      Originally Posted by Chris Walker View Post

      Email marketing... Possibly the hardest topic to talk about.
      When to email, what to send out, when to sell, how to build relationship..

      These questions will never be answered with a right or wrong answer. You need to get a goal for the purpose of building your list first then break it down. For example, if you opt into those so called "Guru's list", you will find that you will receive emails everyday with subject lines forcing you to open. Such as Your paypal has been cancelled.

      On the other hand, most bloggers will send their subscribers back to their website to build that relationship etc.

      What I'm trying to say is, there is never a right or wrong answer to email marketing. It all depends on what your goal is.

      Thanks Chris

      Since first posting my question, I've been doing a lot of reading and your last sentence is basically what I've been wracking my brain with because I know I really shouldn't continue until I hit that proverbial nail, dead on the head.

      If I don't get lasered focused on that goal, I may not be able to deliver to a list, the value that is needed to be in a win/win situation for us both.

      Thanks for confirming this and keeping me on track to the all-necessary basics of starting a list in the first place.

      I feel I'm getting closer to understanding what I think is needed.

      Thanks Everyone,
      Joe
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Hill
    I have email series' setup that do all my up-selling for me. Of course I have many products in another niche and my preloaded emails lead them through many funnels giving good value in their own right which naturally leads the read to the next logical step which is to purchase the next product if they need the solution.

    I also send broadcast emails when I release a new product and sometimes I run a huge 4-day sale which really kicks up the sales volume. (Learned that one from Frank Kern)

    Like others have said, there is no right or wrong answer here - it depends on what your goals are. For me, the majority of my sales come from my autoresponder messages. It's all automated so I just have to concentrate on buying traffic and testing out new and interesting angles to get more subscribers. Everything else is pretty much hands free until I want to create a new product.

    Sure, I sometimes outsource this process but I also like the creation process and will create my own products as well. I have a pretty slick product creation system going so it only takes me a week at most to create new products.
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  • Profile picture of the author Joe J
    Thanks Mike,

    That seems to be a key also, LOGICAL STEPS. A lot must be lost if your all over the place with your sequence.




    Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

    You may just have coined a very valuable and appropriate usage, here, Joe ...

    Ephemeritis: "a condition exemplified by the rapidly declining open-rates and click-through rates characteristically experienced by marketers who have depended primarily on search-engine traffic, done little or nothing to brand themselves, inadequately set their subscribers' expectations, failed to appreciate the significance of a continuity-process, and/or depended too much on the use of broadcasts rather than on autoresponder email series".

    Hehehe

    That sounds like an expensive disease with the major symptom being a leakage of dollars from the pockets.

    Some of the regular emails I receive from a couple of lists I'm on make it look so easy.

    To be able to engage the reader with dozens of PRE-loaded messages and keep their attention, add value AND make sure it is not something that they can guess what will be coming next so that they cannot do a search for the rest of what the series of messages will reveal, requires a really true skill-set. Whether it comes natural or not, it's a skill.

    This is just part of the hard work involved in keeping people on your list for a long time and actually begging you to sell them your next product.

    Kudos to the writers who can do that!
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Joe J View Post

      To be able to engage the reader with dozens of PRE-loaded messages and keep their attention, add value AND make sure it is not something that they can guess what will be coming next so that they cannot do a search for the rest of what the series of messages will reveal, requires a really true skill-set. Whether it comes natural or not, it's a skill.
      It's a skill, for sure.

      I think it's a slightly easier skill to acquire, to do that with pre-loaded messages than it is with broadcasts, though. The pre-loaded ones tend to be more carefully, thoughtfully and slowly written, more commonly and better edited, and each individual message can even be refined and improved as you go along.
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Joe, when I do a "blended" list, it's actually two lists.

        The first, and the one people usually join first, is a pre-programmed series designed to bring someone new to the list, and maybe even the subject matter, up to speed. That way, people who have been with you awhile don't get bored while I explain things to newer folks, and the new folks don't get confused or discouraged by my talking over their heads.

        Once they go through the initial sequence, they're offered a "free trial subscription" to the regular newsletter. If they do nothing, they're moved from the starter list to the main list automatically. If they decline, they're not. They do stay on the starter list so I can send an occasional update or announcement (like a new book or product) and a reminder that the trial subscription is still available. This time, though, they have to actively subscribe.

        The emails with the reminder also contain either a link to something light but topical, thought provoking, etc. Or a straight up "list maintenance test message" with a link to the opt-in page and to a good freebie I've found (Amazon Kindle books are great for this in most areas). It gives people another chance to get in or get out while providing something of value along the way.
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  • Profile picture of the author bobby_shahzad
    You need to research properly before scheduling an email Broadcast that's what email marketing is all about try to interact with different email marketers on different online platforms. Apart from forums you can interact with bloggers who write in email marketing niche also there are allot of blue prints available on the internet which can benefit you.
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  • Profile picture of the author Joe J
    Thanks Bobby,

    I like to get on their lists and see for myself. You can usually pick up a thing or 2 this way but I think I mostly pick up more of what I don't want to do than what I should or want to do.
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  • Profile picture of the author Joe J
    Thanks for the reply John.

    I'm a little confused because it sounds like 3 lists: A starter list, a main list and a newsletter.

    I must have read your reply 10 times but can't seem to grasp it. What am I missing?

    I must be missing something obvious.

    Joe
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  • Profile picture of the author Samuel Adams
    Once your series of autoresponder emails end, you will naturally start with broadcast emails which will be more like a newsletter or update email sent to everyone on that list. If you don't use this method, then you would simply stop communicating with everyone on that list.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Joe J View Post

      Thanks for the reply John.

      I'm a little confused because it sounds like 3 lists: A starter list, a main list and a newsletter.

      I must have read your reply 10 times but can't seem to grasp it. What am I missing?

      I must be missing something obvious.

      Joe
      The "main list" and the newsletter are the same list. Here's how you would go through one of these:

      > You opt into a short e-course or starter series. Until you finish this series, you don't get any of the newsletters or other content sent to the main list. Let's say this starter series is seven emails long.

      > After the seventh email in the starter series, you get a final email. It describes the newsletter offers a "free trial subscription". To get the newsletter, do nothing. The autoresponder moves you to the main list. To refuse the newsletter offer, click a link (actually, the standard unsubscribe link).

      > If you elect to do nothing and take the newsletter, you get the standard intro email for the main list, and the newsletter (and other broadcasts as explained in the intro email).

      > If you click the unsubscribe link, you get a final farewell confirmation, and automatically go on the "unsubscribed" list. (This might be the third list you thought I mentioned. This is automatic, and used to filter "accidental" subscribes, like misspellings, pranks, etc.)
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  • Profile picture of the author Joe J
    Thanks Again John,

    I understand it now and I appreciate the further explanation of it.

    Joe
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