Do you discuss the PRICE at the BEGINNING or at the END?

41 replies
Here is the thing. I know, I understand, and eventually I accept that eventually all comes down to the price itself. In the world of freelancing that is painfully true. You barely say hello to a client, and you are already discussing the price. OK, these clients went looking for the freelancers to do the job because of the low prices, in the first place. Yet, the annoying thing is that we are negotiating the price before we even had a chance to discuss the details of the project itself and my portfolio.

Back in my sales days, I had a completely different situation. We, the salesmen, were strictly prohibited to either discuss our prices or show our price lists, before the official presentation of our products is done. You know how it goes. You finally get a meeting with the potential customer. You talk and do your best to relax the atmosphere to make it be more friendly and open. You present your products. Then, at the end, you talk about the prices and payment terms.

I know that it doesn't actually matter that much. If you can close the deal who cares when you had to mention the price, at the beginning, the end, or somewhere in the middle of business negotiations. Right? Yet, my trouble is that I can't find the right model to successfully apply at the moment. I even tried to put my price at the very beginning as the very first line of my offer. This may seem as not such a smart thing to do, but at least, the potential clients addressing me were fully aware of my price related conditions. Now, the trouble is that this particular move significantly limits your maneuvering space regarding price negotiations. What you put is your maximum, not the minimum. Now, the worst part was that some clients didn't even bother to look my offer. So, we were back where we started. The most ridiculous moment was when I used to put the information about my price at the beginning and in the closing lines of my offer. That's was simply, I really don't know what to say.

What should I do? Should my offer include only one single line: my price is X dollars. I charge per hour, page, word, etc. If you like the price, then we can move on. Is it any different if you are looking for the clients outside the freelance platforms? I remember when I used to look for a regular 9-to-5 job. There was always a line in the application form saying, include your salary expectations. At the job interview, that's was a great finale, you were supposed to mention and discuss your future salary with your future employer. Right? For what is worth that was something taking place at the end, rather than the beginning of the entire process.

I would really to hear what's the best solution to change this situation and move the sweet price talks at the end of the negotiation process where they certainly belong. This way, what's the point? You invest your time, energy, and even money in your portfolio. For what? So, it won't be even considered if the price isn't right. I also remember saying, we will eventually come to this (meaning the price), but some clients were obviously too impatient. Then, when you begin your future business relationship with the price talks, you are risking it to be treated as a pushy service provider. Sometimes, I just don't know how and what to do, to make it right.

All successful price negotiators are strongly encouraged to share their word of advice. Thanks in advance.
#beginning #discuss #end #price
  • Profile picture of the author Chris-
    Here's a few answers . . .

    1) When selling in person, in situations where you can quantize the interest or results, then don't use the word "price" or "pay" at all, but instead use the word "invest". For example, when selling a website to a restaurant that doesn't have one, find the number of searches for that type of restaurant in that location, then start the conversation by giving that information, for example "did you know that 2,500 people are searching for 'Italian restaurant Chicago' every month and right now none of those people are finding you", then quantize the benefits, i.e. ask how much profit the restaurant makes per customer (on average), multiply that by something like 10% of the search results, then you have a figure for the additional monthly profit they might make, such as 250x100 or whatever it is based on their estimates. Then you ask how much they'd consider investing to get a return on investment of 30k per year. If they hesitate say "I'm sure you'd agree that investing $1 to get $10 in return is a good deal, right?".

    2) Another answer . . . it depends whether you are paying per click or per lead. So, if your sales text will be read by web-page visitors, then don't mention a price at all, give them a valuable free gift for signing-up to your mailing-list, then give them more valuable free info, and only then start to talk about what you're selling, and the sales-copy, for information-products at least, will usually only mention the price at the end, unless it's an unusually low price (such as a $1 WSO).

    But, if you are paying per lead, then mention the full price in the headline, and don't give them any free gifts. Since you have the same cost per lead, why not qualify as much as possible so you only get people who might be interested after they know the full price, and you avoid anyone who only wants freebies or lower price.

    So make sure you understand this difference between cost per traffic and cost per lead.

    3) another answer . . . many internet-marketing sales-pages follow the same approach . . . first talk about benefits of the product, then talk about the challenges of getting those benefits without the product, then go into more detail about what the product delivers, then talk about how great you'll fee when you get the benefits, then talk about how valuable the product is and how much you could sell it for, then offer the product for a lot less than that.

    This is a common sales-page strategy, and it can work really well.

    4) another answer . . . on the other hand . . . it can be refreshingly honest to mention the price up-front, and people can appreciate that, in some circumstances.


    So, there are many answers for different circumstances. Different personalities will use different strategies, and this is as it should be . . . any "one size fits all" answer is likely to be wrong for most people

    Chris
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  • Profile picture of the author Bobby Davis
    If they ask me price upfront I don't get scared or nervous about answering it. I just know in my mind I have a likely buyer.

    If I tell him the price now, he tries to justify and criticize (in his own mind everything) I say and do and essentially compares it to that price. If I don't get to know what makes his little pee pee hard first (through strategic questioning) then I have very little chance of building value - which the only value that exist in sales is that by which the buyer sees, not what we as sellers see.

    Like the gentleman said intelligently above, it depends on so many factors but just be cool about shit. Be confident. Essentially the idea is, I'll get to the price but first i need to learn more about you so i know how to deliver value to your impatient ass.

    My answer on when to deliver price.

    Depends on how you have profiled the prospect - which is hard to do in the front.

    Options might be to ask a question back to qualify if he's a shopper or a buyer.

    Are you wanting to get some ideas on standard prices in general or did you want me to do what I'm most applauded for which is a Taylor fitted solution for you? What's been your experience so far when looking for this? How'd that go. What turned you off from that guy? What was it you ultimately wanted, I mean really what is an ideal outcome you like to get form something like this?

    OR ANOTHER RESPONSE...

    I'd be happy to find something that makes sense for you and then let you know what it might run you. But first let's make sure we have something that makes sense for you. I still have a lot to learn about you and what it is you're after.

    Start asking qualifying questions.

    -OR-

    Price is always a major factor so I appreciate you wanting to know what you might be lookin at with something like this. The last thing you or I would want is for me to make the wrong recommendation upfront. Right now where at half court so let's get closer closer to the basket and see if we can get a slam dunk out of this. You and I's chances of making from this far out isn't good. Let's first talk about what's truly important to you... what do you think would be an ideal outcome for you on this kind of purchase
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      So, you have nothing against a situation when a client says hello and right after asks, how much is going to cost me? This may be a sign that you find a client who means business or a guy who just want to find a perfect match for his price expectations. Thoughtful points. Appreciated.
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  • Profile picture of the author gingerninjas
    I usually will quote in writing, which is easier as I find people aren't always listening to all the finer details and will usually focus on what they want to hear.

    While you can give an estimate, I would assume it would be important to take the time to do your research and not give a verbal quote over the phone until you have put together a formal quote.

    While for some people they will want to ensure you're in their 'ball park' for price which is understandable, they will be willing to wait a few hours or a day for a quote.

    I outline in fine detail everything I will be including and often include examples so there is absolutely no reason for them to question any of the inclusions.

    I rarely have anyone reject a quote when it is done this way as they can see the value of the project and why I am charging what I am charging.

    To be honest, some of the most annoying discussions I have had with people are individuals who aren't up front about the price. Give an indication of time or hours it might take, give them a bit of a ball park and then you can write your quote down so they have a formal document in writing with all your terms and conditions.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      I like this approach where you take the initiative. Rather than to wait for a client to make the first move, you speak up freely and openly about the price itself. Better to know where you stand now than later. It makes sense. Thank you.
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  • Profile picture of the author PinkStar
    Originally Posted by neshaword View Post

    What you put is your maximum, not the minimum. Now, the worst part was that some clients didn't even bother to look my offer.
    When ever I surf for freelancers I know the price will vary depending on my needs. But I would like to see a starting price or basic price, just to get an idea what I can expect to pay.
    I usually discuss price after I have shared what I'm looking for and what the freelancer can do for me and would charge.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by PinkStar View Post

      When ever I surf for freelancers I know the price will vary depending on my needs. But I would like to see a starting price or basic price, just to get an idea what I can expect to pay.
      I usually discuss price after I have shared what I'm looking for and what the freelancer can do for me and would charge.
      Where have you been all of my freelance life, lol. This is a good thing to hear. So, there are potential clients who appreciate this approach all cards on the table. Hope you have many friends who think the same way, lol. Cheers!
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  • Profile picture of the author helisell
    You just need to take control.

    'Ok Mr Customer I think this meeting boils down to just 2 things really doesn't it?

    One.......what, if anything, can I do for you...and
    Two.....how much is it going to cost you? Yes?

    Let me get a few details from you and see if I can't come up with something that keeps the price as low as possible...yes?

    Now start asking questions.
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  • Profile picture of the author xjokker
    Never be afraid of your "Price". The key is you need to be able to justify the cost. What are they getting out of the deal. If someone can't afford your cost, they were never a prospect in the first place. I would suggest working on your presentation, and how your services are seen as a value to others. Most people know they get what they pay for, but they will still need to know from you and your confidence that the price is worth it.

    A lot of people only try selling their services & products, unless you hold the "only" of it's kind solution to their needs, they can always buy elsewhere. Keeping this in mind, make sure you sell yourself, what can you bring to the table for them? Your experience, skills, or even just your enthusiasm, can win sales over and over.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by xjokker View Post

      Never be afraid of your "Price". The key is you need to be able to justify the cost. What are they getting out of the deal. If someone can't afford your cost, they were never a prospect in the first place. I would suggest working on your presentation, and how your services are seen as a value to others. Most people know they get what they pay for, but they will still need to know from you and your confidence that the price is worth it.

      A lot of people only try selling their services & products, unless you hold the "only" of it's kind solution to their needs, they can always buy elsewhere. Keeping this in mind, make sure you sell yourself, what can you bring to the table for them? Your experience, skills, or even just your enthusiasm, can win sales over and over.
      This is great. Very positive and encouraging. If I fix my price attitude then I don't have to worry where the price itself jumps into the negotiation process, at the beginning or the end, or somewhere in the middle. Appreciated.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dora1245
    Price means much and you have to know what you pay for.
    Usually I discuss price at the end what I know the amount of resources I'm going to get.
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  • Profile picture of the author gpacx
    I've been doing pretty well as a Freelancer for the last little while and I would say a big part of that has to do with how I profile prospective clients in terms of what they can afford to pay. I think the most important thing is that you have to be able to walk away from jobs that aren't worth it for you. How are you quoting prices right now? What is that based on? How much are you quoting? If I'm willing to pay $20 per hour and you give me a quote of $10, it doesn't really matter when you give the quote because I'm going to be undeterred by it, however if you quote $25, it might be better to give the quote at the end.

    I think it's crucial that you don't give a concrete price until you have an exact scope of work in front of you and you've consulted with the client. At this point, just decide what you want to get paid and give the quote and if they say no, don't take the work. It doesn't have to be a big song and dance - you know what your time is valued at and you don't need to bill more than that, nor does the client need to pay more.

    If you know that you want to bill at $30/hr, just do it. In my experience, you make a lot more money from finding people that will pay you what you're worth than you do from taking every job that you can. If I need to make $100, I'm looking for someone that's going to pay me $50 per hour for two hours of work, not someone who wants to pay me $10/hr for ten hours of work. I would take the extra eight hours and use it to find more clients.

    How can you even give an accurate quote if you're giving that first and going over project details last? If you're stressed that you're wasting time talking to clients who don't want to pay your prices, you should probably raise your prices, bid higher and try to weed out people that don't want to pay your rates. To me, clients are so worthwhile that I have no problem talking to someone on the off-chance that they'll give me the deal I want.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Being a freelancer yourself, you are in a position to understand how the dynamics in our field of work doesn't have a positive meaning. It's stressful, without guarantees of any kind, and the situation changes in a blink of an eye. Yes, I do have an hourly rate because I am obliged to do so according to the rules on both Upwork and Freelancer. However, to be quite honest I prefer to work according to the price based on the number of words. I know it doesn't sound poetic at all and I know that some warriors roll their eyes to the very mentioning of such a practice, but this is my real freelance world.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    The fact that you're struggling with clients over pricing issues tells me that you're dealing with much less than optimal clients. You're attracting people (potential customers) for whom the price is the overriding variable in their purchase decision. Those aren't the kind of clients I want.

    You're attracting discount seekers and cutthroat artists that pride themselves in paying the least they can for your service. Not only that, you're competing with service providers that take pride in the fact that they charge less than anyone else in the industry.

    When you sell products, having the "lowest price on the Internet" can be a great motivator to buyers because products are standardized and the buyer knows what he is getting for his money. The lower the price, generally the better for the customer.

    Services are altogether different. They are not standardized and the benefit and deliverables that a client receives can vary widely.

    As a service provider, you want to attract and cultivate customers (clients) that are willing to pay you a reasonable amount for your outstanding service in whatever you produce. The clients are most interested in what you can do for them . . . not what you charge to do. Believe it or not, these kinds of clients exist in every marketplace.

    You stated: "I would really to hear what's the best solution to change this situation" and " I just don't know how and what to do, to make it right."

    To me the solution you should work toward is this:

    Don't be content to deal with the bottom feeders and discount seekers. Change your audience. Try to attract clients that are willing to pay a reasonable amount for high quality service and output. Stop worrying about "price negotiation" and up the quality of your work so that it attracts those who see the value and are anxious to get in line to give you their money for your outstanding attention to their needs.

    You really do have a choice as to whom you serve.

    Good luck,

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Steve,

      What's fair is fair. I do have a choice. Everyone has a choice. Regarding the quality of clients. The first association about freelancing people have are rock bottom prices. That's not a surprise. Both clients and freelancers who work on these platforms are to be blamed.

      Maybe I should write a thread about it. But the things are changing. For the first time there is something called the Preferred Program on Freelancer. You need to have a five-star rating and a flawless reputation to apply. You can bid only when invited. The clients who look for the freelancers through this program don't treat the price itself as their #1 priority.

      Thank you for your comment. Appreciated.

      Nesha
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnVianny
    IT'S NEVER ABOUT THE PRICE


    it's about the PERCEIVED VALUE.

    I mean: if your client has clear in mind what is your value, and in particular WHAT REALLY IS THE DIFFERENCE between you and the others competitor.... the price is not a problem.

    I suggest you to do some Lead Generation and Lead nurturing to better inform your potential client about the difference between you and competitors: what is the reason why i have to choose you?

    So it's not about putting your price on the first hand or at the end, cause if you make your potential audience aware of the value of your work, they dont realy care about it.

    It's not about lowering your price: if you do this, you will jump in the jungle of people who always lower their value til it reach zero.

    So, better do some lead generation: make a list of potential clients, give samples, and tell them about the specific difference, what makes them choose you.

    So then a paypal button to buy is the necessary consequence.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Connann,

      Hope I haven't missed a letter or two, lol. I appreciate your comment. At the same time, I have nothing to hide or to be ashamed of. I live and work in the freelance jungle. This is my reality. So, it is not all about the price, but it eventually comes down to the price itself. Meaning, if I want to change the rules of the game, and that is impossible, maybe I should change the game itself. Instead of complaining and crying over the spilt milk, I should step out and look for new clients on LinkedIn or through my own website, which I need to launch btw.

      Definitely a thought worth considering.

      Thx.
      N
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  • Profile picture of the author maxxlife
    we should listen first what they are talking about and what they are offering , sometime person telling different and we expect different. Now question we can talked about price like we are looking a service or thing in this $$$$ range, so person have an idea about our price range.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by maxxlife View Post

      we should listen first what they are talking about and what they are offering , sometime person telling different and we expect different. Now question we can talked about price like we are looking a service or thing in this $$$$ range, so person have an idea about our price range.
      One warrior said that honesty is the best policy. I just couldn't possibly agree more with this one. Hello, let's make the long story short. What's your budget? Just like that. Why not?
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  • Profile picture of the author zdebx
    You mainly have to worry about pricing when you are doing cheap projects and dealing with low-end clients.

    Surely, you realize that there are clients who are willing to pay whatever you charge, as long as you can complete their complicated unique projects?

    Of course, they will get a few quotes just for the sake of comparison, but a client looking to outsource a serious project won't simply go for the cheapest option - he will choose the best person for the job and usually professional workers charge good money.

    Lesson - don't focus on how much you charge, but more on what you offer.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by zdebx View Post

      Lesson - don't focus on how much you charge, but more on what you offer.
      Hope I won't have to learn this lesson the hard way. Appreciated. N
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  • Profile picture of the author Rocket Media
    Price. The most difficult thing in the world of sales & marketing. What the HELL should the price be...? WHEN the hell should we tell the price?

    Well, personally, I do not tell the price until the absolute END. I tell the prospect every single thing that they will receive, nothing more, nothing less, and then tell them the price. I must research & do two different spreadsheet/powerpoint presentations for the prospect before I can discuss the price.

    If they hit me with "what are your fees" before we have even talked, then I say "Well that depends" and go into my spiel.

    Customers have to understand EXACTLY what they are purchasing, and for how much, and what the delivery will look like, or they will not purchase.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by Rocket Media View Post

      Customers have to understand EXACTLY what they are purchasing, and for how much, and what the delivery will look like, or they will not purchase.
      Respect! Maybe it's worth all the trouble and time, especially. Sometimes I'm so tired that I just wanna get over with. Here's my price. Take it or leave it, but let's end this. Or, you wanna know about my price before you even allowed me to say hello. Here it is. Of course, these scenarios don't end up well for me. Thx. N
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  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    When dealing with commodities, price rules. When was the last time you put gas in your car and something other than distance and price came into play?

    If you're not dealing with commodities, price, though important, is not the main/first thing that comes to mind.

    And, it's not called price but cost or investment.

    The question for you is: how do you stop being perceived as a commodity. (First step, stop seeing yourself as such... Not being glib and it's not easy. It involves serious thought about your skills and packaging them differently.)

    The next thing you need to do is stop chasing and/or accepting jobs from anybody who's willing to pay you something. Set yourself a new standard.

    Take into account that there's real and perception. That people don't care about the wise man at the bottom of the mountain or sitting on the prairie but they go through a lot to reach the wise man at the top of the mountain.

    Not gibberish, I'll let my memory misquote (closely enough) Dan Kennedy: who do you think is a better heart surgeon, the one that can take you in the day you call or the one that can take you in two months from the day you call.

    So, Nesha, as far as writing goes:
    What are you really good at?
    How are you different from other writers?
    Do you understand that if you make a living as a freelance writer you're not in the business of writing but in the business of marketing a freelance writer?

    Taking me as an example, I have extra knowledge, compared to other writers, of mortgages, real estate appraising, marketing, French and Italian lit/cultures, wordpress, SEO.

    I'd be presenting myself as a mortgage specialist, because in my world there's lots of people competing in the other areas where I know stuff more than the average Joe and lots of mortgage writers who know the lingo but have never had the experience of originating or processing a loan.

    I'd, then, make myself
    a list of mortgage companies that just opened up
    a list of mortgage companies that have blogs
    a list of mortgage companies that advertise.

    Then, I'd contact them, proposing content more precise than the content they have. (By the way, I did that once upon a time as a test. My stuff was far more precise than what they were used to; made them really happy.) I did not start to get push-back on prices till I reached $196 for 300-400 words articles.

    And that was just a marketing test I did. I was targeting small mortgage brokers, offering blog posts. This was in 2014.

    As part of the test, I also targeted mid-sized car-repair shops. I have little interest in cars and little knowledge. Last car I bought, I bought for two reasons:
    it was a Honda and I think they last a long time
    it was a blue and blue makes my eyes stand out.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by DABK View Post

      When dealing with commodities, price rules. When was the last time you put gas in your car and something other than distance and price came into play?

      If you're not dealing with commodities, price, though important, is not the main/first thing that comes to mind.

      And, it's not called price but cost or investment.

      The question for you is: how do you stop being perceived as a commodity. (First step, stop seeing yourself as such... Not being glib and it's not easy. It involves serious thought about your skills and packaging them differently.)

      The next thing you need to do is stop chasing and/or accepting jobs from anybody who's willing to pay you something. Set yourself a new standard.

      Take into account that there's real and perception. That people don't care about the wise man at the bottom of the mountain or sitting on the prairie but they go through a lot to reach the wise man at the top of the mountain.

      Not gibberish, I'll let my memory misquote (closely enough) Dan Kennedy: who do you think is a better heart surgeon, the one that can take you in the day you call or the one that can take you in two months from the day you call.

      So, Nesha, as far as writing goes:
      What are you really good at?
      How are you different from other writers?
      Do you understand that if you make a living as a freelance writer you're not in the business of writing but in the business of marketing a freelance writer?

      Taking me as an example, I have extra knowledge, compared to other writers, of mortgages, real estate appraising, marketing, French and Italian lit/cultures, wordpress, SEO.

      I'd be presenting myself as a mortgage specialist, because in my world there's lots of people competing in the other areas where I know stuff more than the average Joe and lots of mortgage writers who know the lingo but have never had the experience of originating or processing a loan.

      I'd, then, make myself
      a list of mortgage companies that just opened up
      a list of mortgage companies that have blogs
      a list of mortgage companies that advertise.

      Then, I'd contact them, proposing content more precise than the content they have. (By the way, I did that once upon a time as a test. My stuff was far more precise than what they were used to; made them really happy.) I did not start to get push-back on prices till I reached $196 for 300-400 words articles.

      And that was just a marketing test I did. I was targeting small mortgage brokers, offering blog posts. This was in 2014.

      As part of the test, I also targeted mid-sized car-repair shops. I have little interest in cars and little knowledge. Last car I bought, I bought for two reasons:
      it was a Honda and I think they last a long time
      it was a blue and blue makes my eyes stand out.
      You gimme no other choice than to read your comment a couple of times. No need to lie or hide, it's obvious I sell my words per kilo. OK, that's a beginning too. To begin with the precise diagnosis. Painful but helpful. Cheers!!
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  • Profile picture of the author aizaku
    depends on the niche..

    on my ecommerce site. the price is right next to the printable.


    in the dating and mmo niches that im in..its usually at the bottom.

    -Ike Paz
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  • Profile picture of the author marktman571
    Originally Posted by neshaword View Post

    Here is the thing. I know, I understand, and eventually I accept that eventually all comes down to the price itself. In the world of freelancing that is painfully true. You barely say hello to a client, and you are already discussing the price. OK, these clients went looking for the freelancers to do the job because of the low prices, in the first place. Yet, the annoying thing is that we are negotiating the price before we even had a chance to discuss the details of the project itself and my portfolio.

    Back in my sales days, I had a completely different situation. We, the salesmen, were strictly prohibited to either discuss our prices or show our price lists, before the official presentation of our products is done. You know how it goes. You finally get a meeting with the potential customer. You talk and do your best to relax the atmosphere to make it be more friendly and open. You present your products. Then, at the end, you talk about the prices and payment terms.

    I know that it doesn't actually matter that much. If you can close the deal who cares when you had to mention the price, at the beginning, the end, or somewhere in the middle of business negotiations. Right? Yet, my trouble is that I can't find the right model to successfully apply at the moment. I even tried to put my price at the very beginning as the very first line of my offer. This may seem as not such a smart thing to do, but at least, the potential clients addressing me were fully aware of my price related conditions. Now, the trouble is that this particular move significantly limits your maneuvering space regarding price negotiations. What you put is your maximum, not the minimum. Now, the worst part was that some clients didn't even bother to look my offer. So, we were back where we started. The most ridiculous moment was when I used to put the information about my price at the beginning and in the closing lines of my offer. That's was simply, I really don't know what to say.

    What should I do? Should my offer include only one single line: my price is X dollars. I charge per hour, page, word, etc. If you like the price, then we can move on. Is it any different if you are looking for the clients outside the freelance platforms? I remember when I used to look for a regular 9-to-5 job. There was always a line in the application form saying, include your salary expectations. At the job interview, that's was a great finale, you were supposed to mention and discuss your future salary with your future employer. Right? For what is worth that was something taking place at the end, rather than the beginning of the entire process.

    I would really to hear what's the best solution to change this situation and move the sweet price talks at the end of the negotiation process where they certainly belong. This way, what's the point? You invest your time, energy, and even money in your portfolio. For what? So, it won't be even considered if the price isn't right. I also remember saying, we will eventually come to this (meaning the price), but some clients were obviously too impatient. Then, when you begin your future business relationship with the price talks, you are risking it to be treated as a pushy service provider. Sometimes, I just don't know how and what to do, to make it right.

    All successful price negotiators are strongly encouraged to share their word of advice. Thanks in advance.
    Being a freelancer for the last 4 years, I always put forward my price after reading the entire memo provided by the client.Reason because most of the time the job doesn't completely entail the ins and outs of the particular task so you can't set the price right away. Therefore I prefer to have a detailed chat with the employer to get a rough idea that how much hours I need to put to get the job done. Based on that I set my price. But on the contrary, if the employer offers me good money for the project which I think equates well with my time expenditure then I accept the offer without negotiation.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by marktman571 View Post

      Being a freelancer for the last 4 years, I always put forward my price after reading the entire memo provided by the client.Reason because most of the time the job doesn't completely entail the ins and outs of the particular task so you can't set the price right away. Therefore I prefer to have a detailed chat with the employer to get a rough idea that how much hours I need to put to get the job done. Based on that I set my price. But on the contrary, if the employer offers me good money for the project which I think equates well with my time expenditure then I accept the offer without negotiation.
      As fellow freelancers we know all too well that the second scenario is a rarity these days. I don't like to repeat myself, but sometimes I'm just tired. I put the price at the beginning of my proposal, bid, offer, call it what you want. I know it's stupid and mostly ineffective. Yet, these negotiations aren't covered by my hourly rate. Not to mention, the time I have to spend for checking out the projects and bidding all day long. Thx. N
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    So - you stopped by this morning to BUMP ALL of your own threads?
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    • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      So - you stopped by this morning to BUMP ALL of your own threads?
      This troll has wasted enough of our time, let him bump all he wants. But let him hear crickets.

      GordonJ

      Not feeding the trolls.
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      • Profile picture of the author lgibbon
        Banned
        Originally Posted by GordonJ View Post

        This troll has wasted enough of our time, let him bump all he wants. But let him hear crickets.

        GordonJ

        Not feeding the trolls.
        If everyone kept reporting these instead of answering them
        we wouldn't have to put up with them for very long.
        It only takes a few people to make them vanish.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnTimmins
    Price discussion is always at the end, once you explained all the value your customer will get, and most important how much it cost not to buy your product, solution or service.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by JohnTimmins View Post

      Price discussion is always at the end, once you explained all the value your customer will get, and most important how much it cost not to buy your product, solution or service.
      I hear you John, but my trouble, maybe that's the problem only for freelancers, is that you have clients who say, hello, what's your price. Trust me when I say, some of them aren't willing to move on with the negotiation unless I specify my price. So, that's the biggest problem. I would like to simply ignore them, but then I ask myself, what if. I let too many of those price killers walk by me. Huh, I should change my freelance status then, lol. Thank you for your comment. Cheers!
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      • Profile picture of the author DABK
        How do you know what to charge before you know what the job is?

        As many have told you, have a range. Or, maybe better, a menu.

        By which I mean:
        general knowledge content is $0.1/word
        general knowledge content that is SEO'd is $0.12/word
        basic agricultural knowledge content is $.12/word
        advanced agricultural knowledge is $.15/word (.17 if SEO'd).

        But, if they start with What's your price? don't you automatically respond with I don't know till I know what the job is?

        Did you ever call a bakery and said: What's your price, without specifying for what item?

        Do it sometime. You'll learn that they'll say, For what? Bread, cookies, muffins? And if the next word out of your mouth is not muffin or some other bakery product, they hang up on you because, unlike you, they know that there is no price. There are only prices.

        Originally Posted by neshaword View Post

        I hear you John, but my trouble, maybe that's the problem only for freelancers, is that you have clients who say, hello, what's your price. Trust me when I say, some of them aren't willing to move on with the negotiation unless I specify my price. So, that's the biggest problem. I would like to simply ignore them, but then I ask myself, what if. I let too many of those price killers walk by me. Huh, I should change my freelance status then, lol. Thank you for your comment. Cheers!
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  • Profile picture of the author sylviad
    You've heard the saying... "You can't please all the people..." Some will want the price up front while others want to hear your offer. Both have advantages: price up front enables both of you to qualify or disqualify the lead. Why spent time pitching to someone who isn't willing or can't pay what you charge?

    As a simple example... When I shop for a blouse, I immediately look at the pricing to see if I can afford it. Whether or not I like it is irrelevant at that point. Conversely, if I have a wad of money to spend or am desperate for clothes, I'll start by looking at the styles and then the price.

    If you opt to hold off on revealing your price, start by explaining that there is price and there is quality... which is most important to you? And then provide a comparison to what you offer vs another person offering the same thing for less. How is yours superior? Why is it worth more? But you probably already know this if you've been in sales before.

    If you opt to reveal up front, rather than giving an exact price, give a range within which their project might fit, then explain the difference and qualities.

    I'm one of those who, in many cases, want to know the cost up front... because I'm cheap. But mostly because I have a low budget and don't want to waste time listening to an offer I can't afford. And I do hate it when they try to 'sell' me with statements like, 'well, you can't consider the price when it's something you need...' or something like that. That just makes me angry because they are ignoring my financial situation like it's irrelevant.

    I know some people come right out and ask the client what is their budget for this project. You could try that. But generally speaking, I'd say to take each case on its own merits and approach it accordingly.

    Hope this helps.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by sylviad View Post

      I'm one of those who, in many cases, want to know the cost up front... because I'm cheap. But mostly because I have a low budget and don't want to waste time listening to an offer I can't afford. And I do hate it when they try to 'sell' me with statements like, 'well, you can't consider the price when it's something you need...' or something like that. That just makes me angry because they are ignoring my financial situation like it's irrelevant.

      I know some people come right out and ask the client what is their budget for this project. You could try that. But generally speaking, I'd say to take each case on its own merits and approach it accordingly.
      Great points. Thx. Just thought of something. "You can't make the whole world like what you do, just the guy who's supposed to pay for it." Cheers!
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  • Profile picture of the author skymann
    The old adage is "sell the benefits before mentioning the price".
    Sell the benefits of the product, explain the problems if the buyer does not have the benefits, tell them what the product delivers, re-state the benefits and the value of the product and the real value then offer the product fat a much lower price.
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  • Profile picture of the author Omarkenawy
    When it comes to price, you can make it about the value your product provides to your costumer. Rather than being a cost center, the prospect views it as an investment.

    So before talking about the money, give away much of value in your sales conversation.

    Thanks
    Omar
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    As many as his 'client' has requested?
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    Saving one dog will not change the world - but the world will change forever for that one dog.

    I'm going to work on being less condescending
    (Condescending means to talk down to people)
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  • Profile picture of the author Tony Laroche
    Originally Posted by neshaword View Post


    I even tried to put my price at the very beginning as the very first line of my offer. This may seem as not such a smart thing to do, but at least, the potential clients addressing me were fully aware of my price related conditions. Now, the trouble is that this particular move significantly limits your maneuvering space regarding price negotiations. What you put is your maximum, not the minimum. Now, the worst part was that some clients didn't even bother to look my offer. So, we were back where we started. The most ridiculous moment was when I used to put the information about my price at the beginning and in the closing lines of my offer. That's was simply, I really don't know what to say.
    I can't afford that - is one of the most common objections about price. You don't want people to think of you as being too cheap or expensive, without knowing what you have to offer.

    You want them to first see the value you offer. So taking them in that direction before showing them what you charge will help.

    My own sales page in the dating niche and most others always have the price at the end, after the reader is taken on a journey of the key features and benefits.

    Its pretty much like a job interview where salary is discussed at the very end.
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    • Profile picture of the author neshaword
      Originally Posted by Tony Laroche View Post

      I can't afford that - is one of the most common objections about price. You don't want people to think of you as being too cheap or expensive, without knowing what you have to offer.

      You want them to first see the value you offer. So taking them in that direction before showing them what you charge will help.

      My own sales page in the dating niche and most others always have the price at the end, after the reader is taken on a journey of the key features and benefits.

      Its pretty much like a job interview where salary is discussed at the very end.
      I hear you Tony. My trouble working as a freelancer is that some guys, and I really mean it, simply miss the info about the price I put at the end of my offer. It's unbelievable. Rest assured that I write a personalized offer, including relevant links and examples. That's why, I started including my price at the very beginning. I want to know my situation right away. Let's not waste each other's time if you can't afford my price. Right?

      Now, you used a nice example and a comparison with the job interview. Back in my white collar days, I also got tired of job interviews that all come down to the question about the salary. So, in my CV or motivation letter, I can't remember, I began including the info about my salary expectations. This also meant, I was giving a strong advantage to honest employers who included salary limits in the original job description. The same applies for the clients, who say, I can pay this much for the project. Yet, I'm aware, it's good to negotiate. That's the only way to earn more.
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