29 replies
I've been wondering If placing my website on a C Class IP will help improve ranking? and If I would loose all my back links changing information over to the new C Class Hosting.

So If I place my website on a unique C Class Ip and add weekly content and build links as normal, will it help with my ranking just being on the C Class IP?
#class #hosting
  • Profile picture of the author Geraldm
    Hi Chris,

    I guess the question you are asking is you are currently using an IP address which is shared with many other websites and you want to know if moving to a dedicated IP address that only your website uses will improve your SERP results?

    If that's the question then the answer is .... Maybe.

    Being on a shared IP address is fine ...... the only reason you would want to move to a dedicated IP address is if you moved to a VPS type solution or you found that there were a lot of dodgy/hacking websites using the same IP address of your website.

    If Google found a lot of low quaility or what they call "bad" websites on the same IP address they could block that IP address or they could penalise all websites using that same IP address...

    If this is the case then your SERP results could be drastically bad ... The only thing you can do is use a different IP address which hopefully overtime improve your SERP results.

    Hope that helps.

    Gerald.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bomtik
    Using C class IP's will improve your ranking.
    That's for sure and I have seen attractive offers from aseohosting company.
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  • Profile picture of the author simonrv
    Class C IPs have nothing to do with your rankings. But if you get backlinks from different Class C IPs, it may increase your rankings. BTW, you're in the wrong section mate. This must be posted on the SEO section.
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  • Profile picture of the author JamesMcCaferty
    You're goal here is to have a diverse backlink profile from many different people at many different sites.

    If you are pointing all of YOUR sites on YOUR hosting to each other, then google knows this, and will penalize you for it.

    If you have different C-Class IP's then you can point your sites at each other, and Google won't know it's the same person.

    Also, I wouldn't do A-->B B-->A that looks like a link exchange..and Google Doesn't like that either. Get creative if you're going to do this.
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    • Profile picture of the author Christian Little
      I'm not sure if you understand what a Class C IP is, so let me clarify:

      Class C definition can be found here: Internet Protocol - IP

      The definition you are probably thinking of is the SEO definition, which basically goes like this:

      AAA.BBB.CCC.DDD

      A class C means the CCC bit of the IP is different. This definition is WRONG. The true definition of a Class C means it is in the range of 192.0.1.1 to 223.255.254.254.

      Originally Posted by Chris Ditfort View Post

      I've been wondering If placing my website on a C Class IP will help improve ranking? and If I would loose all my back links changing information over to the new C Class Hosting.

      So If I place my website on a unique C Class Ip and add weekly content and build links as normal, will it help with my ranking just being on the C Class IP?

      Being on a "unique IP" (the proper term here is Dedicated IP), means your site is the only one that has that IP addresses, whereas most websites are on a shared IP address.

      Will it help you ranking? No, not at all.

      This whole class C ip thing is for your BACKLINKS, not your own site. The idea here is that Google wants your site to get links from relevant sites but from a variety of IPs. It doesn't matter if your own site is on a shared or dedicate IP, what matters is that you don't get 500 links from a single IP address with no links from anywhere else.

      Google will not penalize you for being on a shared IP, nor will they give you a ranking bonus for being on a dedicated IP.

      Furthermore, almost every host requires justification for giving you a dedicate IP address (there is a shortage of IPs until IPv6 is rolled out). And most hosts will tell you to find a different hosting company if you are doing it for SEO purposes, very few off the "SEO hosting" option.

      The *only* advantage you might get from being on a dedicated IP is that you can setup a RDNS record, but I seriously doubt Google takes those into consideration as they are predominately for email/spam filtering.

      Originally Posted by Geraldm View Post

      the only reason you would want to move to a dedicated IP address is if you moved to a VPS type solution or you found that there were a lot of dodgy/hacking websites using the same IP address of your website.
      That's incorrect. If you are on a shared IP and it's getting a lot of hacking attempts or anything, you need to ask your web host to move you to a different shared IP.

      Upgrading to a VPS isn't to avoid hackers, they can get you there just as easily. A VPS is a power hosting solution for websites that get a lot of traffic and are causing too much load on a shared server (i.e. if you have a website getting 500+ uniques/day, you should not be on a shared hosting plan).

      If the IPs of your hosting company are repeatedly under attack or abuse, you need to switch hosting companies. If it happens once in a while it's usually not a big deal (everybody gets hit by them).

      The primary reasons to get a dedicated IP are:

      1) Private Nameservers - some people prefer using private nameservers/DNS.

      2) SSL Certificates - unless you are using a shared SSL certificate, a normal SSL requires your site to be on a dedicated IP address. Most merchant accounts and gateways also require your site to be on a dedicated IP to process the credit card transactions.

      Originally Posted by Geraldm View Post

      If Google found a lot of low quaility or what they call "bad" websites on the same IP address they could block that IP address or they could penalise all websites using that same IP address...
      I think this is a rather extreme case. I don't think Google will penalize an IP normally, they usually go after the specific domains that are causing problems.


      Originally Posted by Bomtik View Post

      Using C class IP's will improve your ranking.
      No it won't. Backlinks from different Class C's do.

      Originally Posted by simonrv View Post

      Class C IPs have nothing to do with your rankings. But if you get backlinks from different Class C IPs, it may increase your rankings. BTW, you're in the wrong section mate. This must be posted on the SEO section.
      BINGO.

      Originally Posted by JamesMcCaferty View Post

      You're goal here is to have a diverse backlink profile from many different people at many different sites.

      If you are pointing all of YOUR sites on YOUR hosting to each other, then google knows this, and will penalize you for it.

      If you have different C-Class IP's then you can point your sites at each other, and Google won't know it's the same person.

      Also, I wouldn't do A-->B B-->A that looks like a link exchange..and Google Doesn't like that either. Get creative if you're going to do this.
      BINGO.
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      • Profile picture of the author Geraldm
        Originally Posted by Christian Little View Post

        That's incorrect. If you are on a shared IP and it's getting a lot of hacking attempts or anything, you need to ask your web host to move you to a different shared IP.

        Upgrading to a VPS isn't to avoid hackers, they can get you there just as easily. A VPS is a power hosting solution for websites that get a lot of traffic and are causing too much load on a shared server (i.e. if you have a website getting 500+ uniques/day, you should not be on a shared hosting plan).
        I was referring to the fact no service provider would give you a dedicated IP address on a shared hosting platform (that I know of), and that the only way would be to use a VPS or other dedicated solution.

        Having a dedicated IP has nothing to do with hacking rather to avoid other "Unethical" websites using the same IP address as your website on a shared hosting platform which could effect your SERP results.

        Hope that makes more sense

        Regards,
        Gerald.
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        • Profile picture of the author theimdude
          Originally Posted by Geraldm View Post

          I was referring to the fact no service provider would give you a dedicated IP address on a shared hosting platform (that I know of), and that the only way would be to use a VPS or other dedicated solution.

          Having a dedicated IP has nothing to do with hacking rather to avoid other "Unethical" websites using the same IP address as your website on a shared hosting platform which could effect your SERP results.

          Hope that makes more sense

          Regards,
          Gerald.
          All shared hosting providers should be able to give you a dedicated IP for your domain. If they can't move on to one that can
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Ditfort
    Thank you every body for all the nice responses, I understand now.

    Thanks,
    Chris. D
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    "Revenue is everybody's Business".

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    • Profile picture of the author d-solmedia
      Hoping someone can clarify something for me. For each website that I am going to throw onto a class c IP, I actually need 3 IP addresses - 1 for the website and 2 for the NS. Is this correct? If so, if I have 5 domains that I need on different class c IP's, then I need to buy a package of 15 class C ip's?
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      • Profile picture of the author SkyNetHosting
        Originally Posted by d-solmedia View Post

        Hoping someone can clarify something for me. For each website that I am going to throw onto a class c IP, I actually need 3 IP addresses - 1 for the website and 2 for the NS. Is this correct? If so, if I have 5 domains that I need on different class c IP's, then I need to buy a package of 15 class C ip's?
        No. With most of the SEO hosts you will be utilizing the IP's as follows. I've use one dummy IP as an example.

        mydomain.com > 109.68.33.140 (Hosting IP)
        ns1.mydomain.com > 109.68.33.140 (NS1 IP)
        ns2.mydomain.com > 109.68.33.140 (NS2 IP)

        This way you would only have to pay for single IP and in the same time you can have your own private nameservers.
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  • Profile picture of the author SkyNetHosting
    The 3rd number in a IP block is called C-Class. As an example, within the IP 199(A-Class).200(B-Class).77(C-Class).120, here the C class IP is 77. Sites with similar C classes may be close to each other and may suggest that they reside on the same server.

    Google checks for interlinks between sites hosted on the same C class range, to detect relationships in linking networks. Google may use these info to penalize websites. This is were SEO Hosting kicks in, with C-Class hosting you can get back links from your own networks of sites without being noticed by Google.

    Originally Posted by Chris Ditfort View Post

    I've been wondering If placing my website on a C Class IP will help improve ranking? and If I would loose all my back links changing information over to the new C Class Hosting.
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    • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
      Originally Posted by SkyNetHosting View Post

      The 3rd number in a IP block is called C-Class. As an example, within the IP 199(A-Class).200(B-Class).77(C-Class).120, here the C class IP is 77.
      WRONG!!!!!!!!!

      I can't believe after Christian went and gave you that CORRECT meaning of the class systems that you go and say that.

      I've had to post how this works in this forum many times over the years because people still use all the wrong terminology. It's fine if you're using the wrong terms when explaining this stuff to yourself - but please don't try and tell others about it in the same way.

      Let's cut through the fat of this stuff.

      Most of the terminology being used here is OUT OF DATE - by a long time.

      (around 1993 CIDR was introduced and changed the way IP addressing worked).

      Technically - what Christian said was correct based on the old 'classfull' IP addressing method which is what you all seem to still be talking about - the class of an IP address was defined by the value of the first octet. Because humans prefer base 10 (decimal) this is usually expressed as a decimal number - i.e 192-223 made it a Class C address.

      0-127 = class A
      128-191 = class B
      192-223 = class C

      So whether it was A, B or C - just meant that first digit was different.

      So the IP would look like (as Christian already said) AAA.xxx.xxx.xxx, or BBB.xxx.xxx.xxx or CCC.xxx.xxx.xxx

      At the time that seemed like it would be enough IP addresses, but then they realised that they also had to factor in that some companies might have 3 networks all with 10,000 computers, while other companies had 1000 networks, all with 50 computers on them, so they used the SUBNET MASK along with the IP address to draw a line for where the numbers in the IP were describing a network or a particular computer.

      The subnet mask is the thing you all keep using to talk about classes - which is why there's confusion.

      The subnet mask is much simpler it's just a bunch of 1's followed by a bunch of 0's.

      where the 1's stop and the zero's start is where the boundary between network and PC's happens.

      So 11111111111111111111111100000000 expressed in decimal would be 255.255.255.0

      THIS is what you're all talking about when you say class C.

      That is because the DEFAULT SUBNET MASK applied by a computer when you make the first number in your IP address be 192-223 is that.

      This is just the default value - it doesn't mean that it's what you have to use, and in fact most people do not use that.

      If you see 255 in the subnet mask it just means that all of that octet was 1's - which means all of that number is referring to networks and not devices/pcs.

      So getting back to the OPs question - The question doesn't actually make sense.

      But using the common old-school and misinterpreted meaning that he's clearly using.........

      The question still doesn't make sense.

      "I've been wondering If placing my website on a C Class IP will help improve ranking?"

      The class of your IP is irrelevant to search engines!!!!!

      So let's assume that what you actually mean is that you're on a shared host and sharing the same IP address as other customers of that host - would moving to a different host which gave you an IP of your own (again the 'class' part is meaningless and irrelevant).

      This is where the comments from some people about shared hosting are coming from - unless you're on a host that has spammers then it's irrelevant. If that host has some blacklisted IPs and you're on one of them - then yes moving would remove any potential impact.

      When it comes to links - No - it doesn't make any difference. IP addresses have moved on so much that Google is not stupid enough to think that because you have an IP address which is in a network different to where your link comes from then it's somehow more valuable.

      If you think about it - all those people on shared hosting sharing IPs across thousands of websites would have to be really careful if Google actually gave a crap about it.

      Unless you're doing something weird - no-one cares what your IP is.

      Will you see hosting companies telling you to pay more for a unique IP? Sure - if people will pay for it - they'll charge for it.

      Did it matter in the past? Yes for a while.

      Does it matter now? For most people - no.

      This is a classic IM myth that many people waste a lot of time on and many others make a lot of money from - much like the whole ".edu links are more valuable" myth.
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      nothing to see here.

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      • Profile picture of the author SkyNetHosting
        Originally Posted by Andyhenry View Post

        The 3rd number in a IP block is called C-Class. As an example, within the IP 199(A-Class).200(B-Class).77(C-Class).120, here the C class IP is 77. Sites with similar C classes may be close to each other and may suggest that they reside on the same server.
        WRONG!!!!!!!!!
        I have used the IP 199.200.77.120 as an example. Its not the number of IP's in that particular class
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        • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
          Originally Posted by SkyNetHosting View Post

          I have used the IP 199.200.77.120 as an example. Its not the number of IP's in that particular class
          I know. But you were saying that "The 3rd number in a IP block is called C-Class" which is WRONG.

          As was already said - when IP classes were in use it was ALWAYS the first number and its value that defined the class - the 3rd digit is nothing to do with the class.

          The reason people think it is - is because class C addresses used to be assigned the subnet mask of 255.255.255.0

          That's the only reason people get it confused, and with CIDR came classless IPs - which is what we have used for many years now.
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          nothing to see here.

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          • Profile picture of the author Walter Parrish
            I always thought all the ip addresses were class c, I mean the one's we have access to with the major corps like IBM, Microsoft, SBC etc owning the class A & B. So, I get kinda lost on your question. If it's a shared server yes you won't have your own IP, but the one you're sharing is still a Class C.

            Anyway, I don't think it would affect you, but the thing to keep in mind is having your own ip's helps to separate things and to carry on as a real business. I'm going to guess and say if you have two domains with two sets of ips, and one of those domains gets banned for whatever reason, could be anything these days. That would be that the other domain with separate ip's would be ok.

            Other thing's you may want to think about is security and ssl depending on if you're going to host downloads, accept payments, meet pci compliance etc. It all depends on what you're trying to do.
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            • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
              Originally Posted by Walter Parrish View Post

              I always thought all the ip addresses were class c, I mean the one's we have access to with the major corps like IBM, Microsoft, SBC etc owning the class A & B.
              That was true about 30 years ago - but not for a long time now.
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              nothing to see here.

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              • Profile picture of the author Walter Parrish
                Originally Posted by Andyhenry View Post

                That was true about 30 years ago - but not for a long time now.
                Well heck lol I only quit doing tech for MS in 2002 so it couldn't have been 30 years ago.
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          • Profile picture of the author SkyNetHosting
            Originally Posted by Andyhenry View Post

            I know. But you were saying that "The 3rd number in a IP block is called C-Class" which is WRONG.
            Let me try to explain you once again. A 32 bit ip is made out of 4 parts, XX.XX.XX.XX. The 1st 3 sets define classes. The 1st part is A Class, 2nd is B Class and third is C Class.
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            • Profile picture of the author kpmedia
              Originally Posted by SkyNetHosting View Post

              Let me try to explain you once again. A 32 bit ip is made out of 4 parts, XX.XX.XX.XX. The 1st 3 sets define classes. The 1st part is A Class, 2nd is B Class and third is C Class.
              Sorry, but that's completely incorrect.

              Classful networking ceased to exist about 20 years ago. Everything is CIDR (classless) now. "Class C" means the IP is in the range of 192.0.0.0/8 to 223.0.0.0/8 -- and you could only access that version of the internet through some sort of DeLorian interface (aka, time travel to pre-1993). There is no "class C" IP address space, and hasn't been for quite some time now.

              The third octet of the IP does nothing for SEO rankings, though it does get used for penalization. There are also far more methods of detecting ownership of sites, outside of IP space. Google caught onto this years ago now. You won't do anything but waste money in a failed attempt to trick Google.

              The proliferation of the "Class C" (or "C class") IP happens only in the affiliate marketing world. I don't understand why the community as a whole is so far behind the actual technology (at least a half decade or more).
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              • Profile picture of the author SkyNetHosting
                Originally Posted by kpmedia View Post

                Sorry, but that's completely incorrect.

                The proliferation of the "Class C" (or "C class") IP happens only in the affiliate marketing world.
                The thread is about SEO Hosting (I believe this is what you meant by affiliate marketing world), in SEO hosting, the C-Class definition is exactly as follows (You can Google if you are still not sure) however I would still agree with your definition, which is technically correct but it doesn't really help the purpose of this thread.

                AAA.BBB.CCC.DDD. Third section is called Class IP.

                Hope this helps.
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      • Profile picture of the author SkyNetHosting
        Originally Posted by Andyhenry View Post

        When it comes to links - No - it doesn't make any difference. IP addresses have moved on so much that Google is not stupid enough to think that because you have an IP address which is in a network different to where your link comes from then it's somehow more valuable.
        Do you just assume this or do you have any personal experience with large network of sites to accurately say Google doesn't bother to neutralize links from a network of sites hosted on same IP?

        Google's patents refer to de-valuing links when a site linked to and the site linking to it are hosted on the same IP range. Webmasters that own large networks of sites that are concerned about their interlinked sites sharing IP's are better off using A/BC/-Class IP's rather than hosting all their sites on a single IP.
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  • Profile picture of the author IMSince2003
    Google's algorithms are much smarter than that. Google's engineers know that hosting providers share IP addresses with many clients so penalizing all sites using a single IP would be impractical. Besides, if you use Adsense, they already know which sites are yours and which belong to others.
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  • Profile picture of the author FIERCE IM
    I think the right answer will be to use your hosting class-c ips to create backlinks to your site. Beacause just hoting your site to a class c ips will not improve your rank. you will have to link those sites and then have baclinks and improve your ranking.
    to simplify.

    I hope that help
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  • Profile picture of the author jackbajaj
    i think c class ip through decrease your website ranking value and lose your back links.......
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    • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
      Originally Posted by jackbajaj View Post

      i think c class ip through decrease your website ranking value and lose your back links.......
      Please explain why you say this - it doesn't make any sense.
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      nothing to see here.

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  • Profile picture of the author marian004
    Having a Dedicated IP has zero impact on your ranking . work on other things which are very important, like your keywords, backlinking and content
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  • Profile picture of the author kpmedia
    Well, AA.BB.CC.DD is an invented definition, and comes across as utter nonsense to hosts (real hosts / not resellers, datacenters, etc). "SEO hosting" is snake oil, because it's used by people attempting to trick Google into thinking their self-made interlinking blogs are all unique and unrelated sites. However, that doesn't work. It hasn't worked in many years now. Uniqueness doesn't carry as much weight as authority, and authority is not derived completely from quantity links.

    The affiliate marketing arena (and amateur SEO techniques) have drift far outside of reality in recent years. It's become a religion more than science, because people think X happens simply because they believe it will. Unfortunately, the facts, science and evidence doesn't support any of it.

    "SEO hosting" is just wasting your money on massively over-priced shared hosting. And because "SEO" hosts tend to attract bottom-feeder quality sites, the IP range is more likely to be a disadvantage over benefit, because of downgrading of the IP space's value.

    None of this is secret. Matt Cutts and others have been discussing it for the better part of 5-6 years now. I'm simply dumbfounded that people still believe in SEO hosting. Then again, I guess some people still believe Elvis is alive, that the moon landing was fake, and that 9/11 was a government plot.

    I haven't been active on WF in a few years -- and I was a lurker far before that -- and it's amazing how the same things (most of them outdated and nonsense) are still be touted as "guru methods" and whatnot. There are great things here at WF, but it's under such a pile of clutter.
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    • Profile picture of the author Walter Parrish
      Originally Posted by kpmedia View Post

      Well, AA.BB.CC.DD is an invented definition, and comes across as utter nonsense to hosts (real hosts / not resellers, datacenters, etc). "SEO hosting" is snake oil, because it's used by people attempting to trick Google into thinking their self-made interlinking blogs are all unique and unrelated sites. However, that doesn't work. It hasn't worked in many years now. Uniqueness doesn't carry as much weight as authority, and authority is not derived completely from quantity links.

      The affiliate marketing arena (and amateur SEO techniques) have drift far outside of reality in recent years. It's become a religion more than science, because people think X happens simply because they believe it will. Unfortunately, the facts, science and evidence doesn't support any of it.

      "SEO hosting" is just wasting your money on massively over-priced shared hosting. And because "SEO" hosts tend to attract bottom-feeder quality sites, the IP range is more likely to be a disadvantage over benefit, because of downgrading of the IP space's value.

      None of this is secret. Matt Cutts and others have been discussing it for the better part of 5-6 years now. I'm simply dumbfounded that people still believe in SEO hosting. Then again, I guess some people still believe Elvis is alive, that the moon landing was fake, and that 9/11 was a government plot.

      I haven't been active on WF in a few years -- and I was a lurker far before that -- and it's amazing how the same things (most of them outdated and nonsense) are still be touted as "guru methods" and whatnot. There are great things here at WF, but it's under such a pile of clutter.

      lol Imagine how I feel hearing the term SEO it wasn't called that back in my day. Also, there was no such thing as backlinks or blogs.
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  • Profile picture of the author kpmedia
    Yeah, I hear you...

    I was also doing "SEO" before that term even existed. And all I did was continue both best database practices with best newspaper communication practices -- things I was already skilled at doing (both as sys admin, and as news editor), but together for once. It never once occurred to me that I was doing anything special.

    I remember when people didn't pay attention to HTML page names, HTML file names, filling in all the ALT tags, and things of that nature. "Oh, that's just a waste of time," they'd say. Fast forward years later, and those are probably many of the same people who claim to be SEO experts -- they're never on top of things, it seems. It gives credence to the phrase "Those who can do, those who can't teach." (And I totally dislike that phrase. Yet it rings true in the world of "SEO".)

    Nice to meet you, Walter.
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