[Syndication-Niche research-Physics]-How do I monetize a niche like physics?

24 replies
I look for two things during niche research as an affiliate - a profile of the target audience(hungry), a list of products I can market.

I have a strong background in physics. I am wondering if I can build a list in physics to whom multiple products can be offered.


How do I find products in this niche which are profitable enough to market? I googled up and found mostly books and courses aimed at students. I am assuming it is not possible to sell additional products to an audience like students. In other words, the niche lacks continuity. I get the feeling that I am looking at the wrong places.

Is physics not profitable or am I doing something wrong?

Ravi
#monetize #niche #physics #researchphysicshow #syndicationniche
  • Profile picture of the author Sarevok
    When reading this, the first thing I thought of was "Well you can teach educational guides about physics". But really, you're correct in your assumption.

    You should aim to target things that appeal to the general masses.

    I use the "mall" approach.

    If you gathered up 100 people in the mall, what would they be interested in?

    Odds are, a good portion of them would want the following:

    1) How to lose weight
    2) How to look better
    3) How to make money
    4) How to improve relationships
    5) How to save money
    6) How to improve health

    Those are the big niches that I like, because the majority of people want them. And typically, these are things people will continue to want.

    This is just my personal guideline on general niche selection.

    Regardless of their personal believes, intentions, and regardless of the economy.

    In fact, some of these niches are even stronger in a bad economy.

    Teaching physics is still plausible, but how many products can you possibly sell them?

    A limited quantity. But I suppose you could have a kick ass $500 physics course.

    PS: How many people out of those 100 selected from the mall will be interested in a physics course?

    Food for thought.

    PS: I'm not saying it can't work, but just that there's a limited pool.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        Science is becoming increasingly mainstream in light of massive advances in discoveries in physics such as are beaming from the Large Hadron Collider, closing in on the God particle (Higgs boson), spectacular observations from the Hubble space telescope, and other relatively new discoveries in space exploration, cosmology, astronomy, sub atomic particles, etc.

        While interest has been building up especially over the last few years, this year popular physics has been dominated by the print and broadcast media – exploding with information about the impossibly huge, the unimaginably tiny, and mind-bending paradoxes. This publicity has been changing attitudes toward science in general and physics in particular.

        As for monetizing this niche, Amazon.com and its sister site, AmazonSupply.com, have vast arrays of books, equipment, and products for professional science specialists, researchers, applied engineering, enthusiasts, hobbyists and laymen alike.
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        • Profile picture of the author onSubie
          Originally Posted by myob View Post

          Science is becoming increasingly mainstream in light of massive advances in discoveries in physics such as are beaming from the Large Hadron Collider, closing in on the God particle (Higgs boson), spectacular observations from the Hubble space telescope, and other relatively new discoveries in space exploration, cosmology, astronomy, sub atomic particles, etc.
          Not to mention the popularity of "The Big Bang Theory" sitcom that brings all these "big words" to the common market.

          Mahlon
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  • Profile picture of the author WeavingThoughts
    Physics books, amazon and stuff.
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  • Profile picture of the author Will Edwards
    I would not say that you cannot monetise that niche, but you are going to have a hell of a struggle to do so. Just bear in mind that it takes the same amount of effort to create a winning site as it does to create a flop.

    Will
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  • Profile picture of the author Ravikanth
    @Will
    There is a Veteran marketer, myob, who successfully monetizes niches like physics, biotechnology, and etc. I have no clue on how he does it though.
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Actually physics is only one of dozens of niches in which I market. Contrary to what has been said here in this thread, there is wide appeal for "science" in general (including science fiction), but the most lucrative arenas are in applied science, emerging technology, and specialty research lab equipment sales. There is also a huge market in debunking pseudoscientific conspiracy theorists.

      My marketing model is simple, and the same format for all niches. Write heavily researched articles with citations from authoritative sources, then submit these articles to targeted outlets such as ezines, blogs, newsletters, and offline publications such as specialty magazines, trade journals, newspapers, etc.

      These syndicated articles never promote any particular product; they serve only to establish an authority status among the targeted reading audience and drive traffic to my sites. Once these leads enter my sales funnel, the conversion process grinds them further in daily promotions to qualify buyers for incrementally higher end products.

      Here are some publications that may be helpful in getting a grasp on the market potential within this and related niches: American Scientist, Discover, Popular Science, Popular Mechanics, Science News, Scientific American, Physics Today, Physics World, Technology Review, Air & Space, Astronomy Magazine, Planetary Report, Sky and Telescope, Skeptic, The Scientist.
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      • Profile picture of the author Geordie John
        Originally Posted by myob View Post

        Actually physics is only one of dozens of niches in which I market. Contrary to what has been said here in this thread, there is wide appeal for "science" in general (including science fiction), but the most lucrative arenas are in applied science, emerging technology, and specialty research lab equipment sales. There is also a huge market in debunking pseudoscientific conspiracy theorists.

        My marketing model is simple, and the same format for all niches. Write heavily researched articles with citations from authoritative sources, then submit these articles to targeted outlets such as ezines, blogs, newsletters, and offline publications such as specialty magazines, trade journals, newspapers, etc.

        These syndicated articles never promote any particular product; they serve only to establish an authority status among the targeted reading audience and drive traffic to my sites. Once these leads enter my sales funnel, the conversion process grinds them further in daily promotions to qualify buyers for incrementally higher end products.

        Here are some publications that may be helpful in getting a grasp on the market potential within this and related niches: American Scientist, Discover, Popular Science, Popular Mechanics, Science News, Scientific American, Physics Today, Physics World, Technology Review, Air & Space, Astronomy Magazine, Planetary Report, Sky and Telescope, Skeptic, The Scientist.
        I've bought products with less useful information than this... so much simpler an approach to what i used to do for traffic and sales...
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  • Profile picture of the author Punsak
    If you insight about physics think about problem in your field.
    People always use search engine to find their solution. If their can't find any solution easily and if you can solve their problem they will buy from you.

    Start with root keyword about your field in Google Keyword Tool and see what return
    and try to deep search until you find niche market in your field.

    Always research in Forum about your field.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve B
      Ravi,

      I guess I look at your challenge to monetize a "difficult" niche in a different light. Where others see physics as something to stay away from because it is hard to monetize . . .

      I take that as an opportunity to step in where other marketers won't go.

      I don't have the answers for you as to how to do that, but I would certainly start investigating and doing research online to see if I could figure out this puzzle. Once you do that, your competition will be a lot less than in other popular niches.

      I would begin by trying to identify where physics lovers hang out online. Are there certain sites or forums or groups (Facebook, Yahoo, etc) where they congregate? If you can find them as a group somewhere, you can figure out what they want be asking them.

      (Note: I would think that retailers along the line of Sharper Image would offer products of the kind that would appeal to physics lovers, just as one possible example)

      Good luck Ravi,

      Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Calvert
    Perhaps it is not "physics" that you should focus on monetizing, but your knowledge of physics that would be easier to monetize. For example, sell plans or courses for hobbyists, survivalists, environmentalists, etc. using your credibility as a physicist.
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    You could probably create study guides and sell them online. I know a Network Engineer who does this. Physics is an interesting field, but any college physics professor will tell you... it's hard to find a job in Physics after college.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ravikanth
    @myob
    You just gave me the two things I am looking for in those two posts of yours

    High priced products will involve phone conversations and meetings with the prospects. I am not in US.

    Will it be possible to monetize with a list and syndication-without the offline component? I am assuming this will limit me to just marketing books and some low priced equipment(to a maximum of 500USD). I am wondering if I should get into this.

    On a related but different note, thanks for all the time you spend on this forum.
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by raviandkanth View Post

      @myob
      You just gave me the two things I am looking for in those two posts of yours

      High priced products will involve phone conversations and meetings with the prospects. I am not in US.

      Will it be possible to monetize with a list and syndication-without the offline component? I am assuming this will limit me to just marketing books and some low priced equipment(to a maximum of 500USD). I am wondering if I should get into this.

      On a related but different note, thanks for all the time you spend on this forum.
      You actually can make a very comfortable income just by selling books and low-priced products from Amazon. This can be done with a list and syndication without the offline component. However, closing sales on high end equipment (4-6 figure price range) is difficult without multiple communication channels such as telephone, webinar, personal visits, etc. This type of demographic does not respond well to product "review sites".

      Building lists through article syndication is the most powerful marketing method I have ever known, and it's my method of choice for breaking into any niche no matter how stiff the competition may be. Most of the fields within physics (and science in general) are intensely competitive, but it can also be extremely lucrative.
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  • Profile picture of the author michaelplies
    i suggest clickbank, they have some products on it
    how about creating your own product or even books an publish on amazon

    some people will say it's a very difficult niche

    but use it to your advantage, you will be one of the very few in that niche with internet marketing skills. if you are really good and have nice info to offer, you can dominate that niche in no-time
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    Physics education!
    Schools will pay a lot of money for good leads sometimes. High CPC.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jesse L
    Things that come to mind in related interests such as telescopes (affiliate? some sell for many thousands), altenative energy plans and gadgets, parabolic lenses, solar stoves, book of experiments, surveillance drones. robotics kits, neodymium magnets, etc...

    Seems endless to me...
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  • Profile picture of the author WinstonTian
    A niche is not a topic - it's a group of individuals who are
    willing to buy a solution. Therefore in your case, Physics isn't
    a niche.

    However, if you go deeper into physics, you may find more
    specialized problems that people are facing.

    Physics exams faced by students is a very common one I can
    think of.

    The main key here is DEMAND. Don't start off with a topic.
    Start with the people. The customers. The demand.

    Think you can solve engineering problems? Find highly demanded
    problems and then provide a solution. Money.

    You're not going to make any money if you don't get sales,
    and sales only happen when people want to buy something.

    Winston Tian
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    Cheers,
    Winston
    The Beginner's Doctor

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  • Profile picture of the author WarrenPeterson
    Are you wanting to sell physics products or sell to people whose common interest of physics has brought them together?
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    Do you really want to build a real business?
    Then you need this: 21 Days To Business Success
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  • Profile picture of the author Ravikanth
    @Warren
    I want to utilize my background in physics. I think I should be doing both.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ravikanth
    Thanks again myob. You are one of the few people whose responses are almost always appropriate. A lot of what you tell is more in lines of developing fundamentals rather than discussing just tactics. Your posts along with a few others have shifted my focus to fundamentals.
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  • Profile picture of the author ralceyireo
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    • Profile picture of the author MikeTucker
      Originally Posted by myob View Post

      There is also a huge market in debunking pseudoscientific conspiracy theorists.

      ...For those that missed it, myob also promotes conspiracy theories.
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      ...A tachyon enters a bar.

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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        Originally Posted by MikeTucker View Post

        ...For those that missed it, myob also promotes conspiracy theories.
        Not quite correct. Actually I provoke conspiracy theorists and their believers of the absurd. It is rare that the known laws of physics conspire along with such theories. As explained in this article, people often believe in conspiracies because they are the most "logical" explanation. And scientific models don't necessarily translate well for those with this mindset. "The problem for skepticism is that transcendentalism is intuitive; empiricism is not".

        Reference: Why People Believe in Conspiracies: Scientific American
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  • Profile picture of the author rosetrees
    Imho physics isn't a "niche", it's a category.

    What do you mean when you say "physics"? (Don't shoot me down - I studied physics at university.)

    Who are your target audience?

    0 - 10 years - fun science products for kids. Fun science things that parents can do with their kids - space rockets made from empty drink bottles, that sort of thing.

    11 - 18 years - more serious science home kits. Tutorials for those who want to cram for exams or falling behind in class. Perhaps science camps/classes for holiday/vacation time.

    University students - good offers on course books.

    General population - accessible books on popular science. "What was the Big Bang?", "What is a Higgs Boson and Does Anyone Care?"

    Career Physicists? Keep up to date with the latest research, seminars.

    What products are available in those niches is anyone's guess.
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