Not getting sales from my newsletter - any tips?

27 replies
I'm in the publishing niche and I send out a newsletter every week to opt-in subscribers. I receive good feedback about the value of the information I provide.

I have an ebook on my website which sells quite well, and I give it a plug at the end of each newsletter. My problem is my increase in sales is negligible, perhaps one or two if that from my 1650 subscribers.

I hear stories of people getting $1 per subscriber per month. I'd take a quarter of that right now. What am I doing wrong? Should I include a miniture version of my ebook sales page in my newsletter?

I suppose my question is how do you make an offer, or a link to click onto an offer, highly attractive to newsletter subscribers?

Thanks, Brian.
#newsletter #sales #tips
  • Profile picture of the author WillR
    Who are the people joining your newsletter and what are you promising them when they join? If they are joining with the promise of a FREE newsletter than that's what they will want and expect.

    Perhaps you are also giving away too much free information that they have no need to purchase your paid product. I have seen that happen a lot of times.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941547].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author inudu
    Are you using video? It helps with conversion a lot.
    Signature
    Backlink Insider - My SEO Blog | Monthly SEO Services

    Best Serp Checker - Compare the Best 6 Google, Yahoo! and Bing Rankings Trackers
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941553].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author StingGB
      They are receiving free updates of information I supply on my site. They are not getting any free information regarding the contents of my ebook, which is a completely separate but associated product.

      If I received the same ratio of sales from my subscribers as I do from random visitors to my site I would be expecting 6-7 sales from each newsletter by now, yet I hardly get any.

      I'm just puzzled that people who have made the effort to opt-in to my newsletter seem less inclined to buy than random site visitors.

      I don't have the facilities for video.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941591].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author WillR
        Originally Posted by StingGB View Post

        They are receiving free updates of information I supply on my site. They are not getting any free information regarding the contents of my ebook, which is a seperate associated product.

        If I received the same ratio of sales from my newsletter as I do from just random visitors to my site I would be expecting 6-7 sales from each newsletter by now, yet I hardly get any.

        I'm just puzzled that people who have made the effort to opt-in to my newsletter seem less inclined to buy than random site visitors.

        I don't have the facilities for video.
        They are on a free newsletter. You are conditioning them to expect free information from you week after week. Why would they be in a hurry to buy anything?

        This is a classic example of the difference between a list of freebie seekers and a list of buyers. People who have opted in for something free are generally much less quality leads than if you had built the list selling a very cheap product.

        If you want to turn things around then I would suggest you get rid of the newsletter idea. You have already proven it's not working for you. So the time you are putting into it is being wasted.

        Create one free giveaway for your website. It might be a short report, a short video, whatever. Give away your one best secret. Get people to optin to download this information. Make the free information very easy to consume. It doesn't have to be long it just has to be quality. Focus on quality not quantity. Then send them to your product.

        The time you used to spend on your newsletter can now be spent on driving traffic to this free offer instead.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941602].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author StingGB
          You say I am conditioning my subscribers to receiving free information, yet you suggest I give away a free product. I don't understand the difference.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941642].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author WillR
            Originally Posted by StingGB View Post

            You say I am conditioning my subscribers to receiving free information, yet you suggest I give away a free product. I don't understand the difference.
            1. I optin and receive a free report/video from you full of great information. You then send me to an offer where I can purchase further information from you.

            2. You send me free information each week. Each week I know to expect free information from you. You try and send me to an offer. But I know the next week I will be receiving more free information from you.

            In which case do you think I am less likely to buy something from you?
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941649].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jibran123456
    Improve your quality
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941677].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author StingGB
      Thanks Will. So what you are saying is give them a good free taster, then hit them a few times with an offer of my main product?

      I see the logic of this, but am concerned that the unsubscribes and complaints from the uninterested majority would make me liable to be thrown off Mailchimp.

      Thoughts?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941753].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author WillR
        Originally Posted by StingGB View Post

        I see the logic of this, but am concerned that the unsubscribes and complaints from the uninterested majority would make me liable to be thrown off Mailchimp.

        Thoughts?
        If you give people exactly what they asked for then why would they complain? Give them exactly what you promised them on the squeeze page.

        Your freebie should be valuable to them. Something they will get a heap of value from. Remember though, this doesn't mean your freebie has to be big or long. It just means you need to give away your one best tip or your one best secret. If you give them value then why would they complain?

        If your freebie is good enough then they should LOVE to see the opportunity to purchase more advanced information or solutions from you.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941811].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author StingGB
          Originally Posted by WillR View Post

          If you give people exactly what they asked for then why would they complain? Give them exactly what you promised them on the squeeze page.

          Your freebie should be valuable to them. Something they will get a heap of value from. Remember though, this doesn't mean your freebie has to be big or long. It just means you need to give away your one best tip or your one best secret. If you give them value then why would they complain?

          If your freebie is good enough then they should LOVE to see the opportunity to purchase more advanced information or solutions from you.
          At the moment I give away regular free information to people who have voluntarily opted in. And the consensus is the information's valuable, yet I still get some unsubscribes. I simply can't believe unsubscribes wouldn't increase dramatically if I changed my tactics to purely trying to sell everybody something.

          There's obviously a formula somewhere in there somewhere for me. I'm just unsure as to what it is yet. Perhaps I should subscribe to a few sites along similar lines and do a bit of reverse engineering. I do know however Mailchimp don't tolerate a lot of complaints and I'd hate to jeopardize my hard won list.

          I quite like giving away the information I do, and it keeps me in touch with some of my visitors. I'm just scratching my head for a few tips and tricks to get more clicks on my offer, and getting them to convert. Surely 3 sales per 1000 subscribers each mailshot isn't too much to expect.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941963].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author WillR
            Originally Posted by StingGB View Post

            At the moment I give away regular free information to people who have voluntarily opted in, and the consensus is the information's valuable, yet I still get some unsubscribes. I simply can't believe unsubscribes wouldn't increase dramatically if I changed my tactics to purely trying to sell everybody something.
            It's simple. Give people what you promised them.

            Most unsubscribes occur when people feel you misled them, you do not deliver on your promises, or you spam the crap outta people with offers.

            I never said you should be PURELY trying to sell everybody something.

            I said give away something valuable to get people joining your list. Deliver them exactly what you promised right away. Then make it logical for them to click over to your offer page.

            In your followup emails give away more free content and make sure it always ties back to the offer you are selling. If done properly then people shouldn't have a problem with this at all since you are not just trying to sell them. You are giving them valueable advice as well.
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941977].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author StingGB
              The consensus seems to be: Give away a good freebie which ties in well and leads directly to the main product. Dukegman just sparked an idea. There is a piece of information, a technique, which many of my subscribers will be keen to learn but unsure how to execute. I've done it. It's part of my ebook, and it wouldn't hurt to give this away. I'm thinking a 'Discover How To...' heading somewhere in my newsletter, and a link to a private website page. I simply publish that part of my ebook, and add copious plugs for the additional puchaseable information throughout the piece. Sounds ridiculously obvious now but I wouldn't have thought of it without this discussion. I'm going to give it a try. Thanks very much everyone.
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7942040].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author David Moore
    Have you consider to try an email newsletter sequence with a pattern. For example you want to promote an ebook in the end of the sequence, so you need to make a stimulating newsletters to build up the curiosity of your list. Also add valuable information on the way.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941782].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
    YOU ARE TRYING TO SELL THEM THE WRONG PRODUCT.

    Information for your newsletter group should be FREE, because their actions demonstrate that they believe information and knowledge should be FREE.

    RETRAIN YOUR AUDIENCE by retargeting what you are offering to them. Continue to provide them free information, but when you are bringing them back to your site, start teaching them about a GREAT AFFILIATE PRODUCT OR SERVICE that they will pay for because it isn't information. You need to give them the value of information about your experience with a product and USE THE TRUST you have built with them to get them to pay for something they will pay for at the end of the day.

    Maybe it is a piece of publishing software you find useful that you can demo for them, maybe it is ---you fill in the blank, but you need to shift the paradigm of what you are marketing to your list to improve your ROI.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7941981].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author dukegman
    As Will already said, you need to give them something of real value to them and then instantly hit them with the best offer. The science here is to let your visitors understand that this is the next big step they should take if they really want to succeed in achieve their goal. And if you do it all right, I bet you will be able to sky rocket your sales (or at least notice a significant increase in sales).

    One thing to keep in mind: "Value is not determined by quantity (only) but quality".
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7942039].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Joe Benjamin
    I love blueberries.

    They're my favorite fruit.

    I don't expect blueberry farmers to give them
    away hoping I'll "be nice" and return and the
    favor by BUYING their blueberries.

    Once I've had my fill of blueberries...do you
    think I want to pay to get more?

    These are the BEST blueberries in the nation.

    No blueberry farmer can hold a candle to this
    guy.

    But he's giving them all away...FREE...in the
    off chance I return to buy his blueberries.

    But why would *I* do such a crazy thing if he
    is giving them away...for FREE?

    I would PRAISE and THANK the blueberry farmer
    for being SO generous...

    ...for being such a kind man.

    I would genuinely be grateful...and naturally
    I would FEEL he expects nothing in return for
    his generous nature.

    If the blueberry farmer is giving his berries
    away...is it wrong for me to assume he expects
    nothing in return?

    How do I know he HOPES and WISH to make money
    from his generosity...

    ...if he doesn't ASK for it?

    Take Care, My Friend...

    ~~ Joey ~~
    Signature
    **How I FLIPPED $80 into $690 Pure Profit With ONE EASY Method...2 to 3x Per Week...Only 30 Minutes Per Day (and how YOU can COPY my RESULTS, too!) **CLICK HERE FOR VERIFIED VIDEO PROOF**
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7943164].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Terry Hatfield
    Hi,

    You don't have a conversion problem, you have a you are not selling them what they want problem.

    If they didn't want your ebook the first few times that you sent your newsletter to them then why do you think the will want it now.

    Sure, some may buy but most have decided they don't want it and have told you that ,loud and clean, by not buying it.

    What you need to do is each time you send them a newsletter you make sure that the offer at the end is something related to the content of that newsletter.

    In other words if this weeks newsletter is about logos then your offer this week should be something about logos that will help them to accomplish the tip you gave them in this weeks newsletter.

    Then if your next newsletter is about getting repeat customers for their business then your offer should be something that will help them get repeat business.

    They read that issue of the newsletter because that is what they are interested in. You need to make darn sure that what you offer them to buy is the same as the content of the newsletter that they were interested enough to read in the first place.

    Hope that helps some,
    Terry
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7944552].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Favion
    Aw, Terry just said what I was going to say.

    Basically, if they are not responding to your product, try other products.

    I may not like bananas, but I may love blueberries.

    Keep testing
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7951183].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author MartinPlatt
    Originally Posted by StingGB View Post

    I'm in the publishing niche and I send out a newsletter every week to opt-in subscribers. I receive good feedback about the value of the information I provide.

    I have an ebook on my website which sells quite well, and I give it a plug at the end of each newsletter. My problem is my increase in sales is negligible, perhaps one or two if that from my 1650 subscribers.

    I hear stories of people getting $1 per subscriber per month. I'd take a quarter of that right now. What am I doing wrong? Should I include a miniture version of my ebook sales page in my newsletter?

    I suppose my question is how do you make an offer, or a link to click onto an offer, highly attractive to newsletter subscribers?

    Thanks, Brian.
    Mathematically speaking if you get 1% conversion rate, adding a couple of subscribers isn't going to change the number of sales necessarily.

    What you probably need to do is some testing to find out how to improve your conversion rate. Try different content, different headlines, more pitches, Different ways to lead your subscribers toward buying...
    Signature

    Martin Platt

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7951214].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author clever7
    The logic behind giving free information to your readers is to make them care about learning something more substantial than the limited knowledge you are giving them.

    The free information must make your readers curious about the content of your ebook. This is the effect that this free information must have.

    Since this information is not having this effect, this means that you have to change the information you are giving to your readers in your email messages. You have to make them desire to learn the missing secrets that you are not revealing in your messages.








    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7951721].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ajsmith
    How about testing your headlines? Better yet give a survey to your readers, the ones who are actually reading your newsletter, and find out exactly what they like about it. Once you find out what people like, make sure that is what you focus on so you can attract even more readers.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7951991].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author cadirondo
    I would suggest that you don't give the ebook a plug at the end of each newsletter. Your clients will have become accustomed to this and over time they will just ignore your advert (because it is something that they will have seen over and over again).

    What I have done successfully is given away a free video followed by a series of emails (5 days) which compliments the free report. I then plug in my product launch which lasts 3 weeks. Rather than hitting them straight away with an offer, I warm them up and tease them before hitting them with the offer. What also works is the scarcity tactic but sticking with it. I have a cap of 100 products to sell. Once that target is hit I take no more orders. Through testing I have found that I make more money this way.

    Also, why not place a banner advert or a text ad for the ebook at a reduced price on your thank you page. Some are already in the buyer's mindset so why not take advantage of this? Advertise it as a OTO.

    I hope you find something that works for you.
    Cadi
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7952125].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author HarrisonJ
    If you want to make $1 per subscriber per month, you have to promote a new product every day. This can be affiliate products, like amazon affiliate books for example. Promoting the same product over and over will only work for so long.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7952137].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author kawaii
    You should poll them.
    Ask them why do they unsubscribe.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7952194].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author celente
    your two problems

    1) Quality actually help them for free, then they think CHIT! if this is this guys FREE stuff imagine what I get if I pay. And then back yourself and release your extra saucy stuff for a small price.

    2) Get rid of tyre kickers, chart $7 initially low price, people think screw it, its only $7 but if you have a big list you can make thousands overnight with a $7 offer and also get them in the habit of buying. WIN WIN!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7952237].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Melodican
    Originally Posted by StingGB View Post

    I'm in the publishing niche and I send out a newsletter every week to opt-in subscribers. I receive good feedback about the value of the information I provide.

    I have an ebook on my website which sells quite well, and I give it a plug at the end of each newsletter. My problem is my increase in sales is negligible, perhaps one or two if that from my 1650 subscribers.

    I hear stories of people getting $1 per subscriber per month. I'd take a quarter of that right now. What am I doing wrong? Should I include a miniture version of my ebook sales page in my newsletter?

    I suppose my question is how do you make an offer, or a link to click onto an offer, highly attractive to newsletter subscribers?

    Thanks, Brian.

    I find a lot of people in this situation actually fear selling..

    I know that sound ridiculous, but it's true !

    I wouldn't bother just 'mentioning' it at the end of your newsletter, I would lead out with it and create a campaign around it.

    The hard part is building that relationship with your customers, and it looks like you've already succeeded with that.

    I recommend 'FRANK KERN 4 DAY CASH MACHINE'

    In it's most basic components, for 4 days, you run a sale.

    Day 1: I'm offering 50% off of my book, here's what you're getting in terms of benefits, you're getting these bonuses and it's going to be rad.

    Day 2:Oh man, we've had loads of responses and people showing interest in it, you should get on this because at midnight on 'thursday' it's coming off the market, maybe for good. (Repeat content from Day 1)

    Day 3: Tomorrow is your final day, you will not get this opportunity again and it's selling out really quickly (Repeat content from Day 1)

    Day 4: 24 Hours left, this is your last opportunity, if you want a well behaved dog / the make money online formula / the bonzai growing blueprint etc, you have to act now because at midnight tonight is gone, you know everything you're getting... (Repeat content from Day 1)


    Dude, this works like an absolute champ in every niche I've tried it in and it's brought in a boat load of sales from it.

    Good Luck !

    M

    P.S. I would recommend adding some more products to the package so that it looks big, bulky and full of great value.. Even though it may contain amazing value, just one ebook ain't all that these days


    _
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7952977].message }}

Trending Topics