What Makes a "Superstar" Salesperson?

39 replies
In another thread, ewenmack raises some good points about being able to identify superstar sales people:

http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...ou-decide.html

(Scroll toward the bottom of the first page)

I'm just wondering, objectively, what makes a true sales "superstar" in your experience? What traits do these superstars possess that others don't? Empathy with the prospect/the prospect's position? A fundamental understanding of psychological triggers, even if subconscious?

More importantly, do you think these traits can be learned? Do they come naturally to some people? Or a combination of the two?

I'm intrigued that Ewen could identify a superstar after a few weeks--what set him apart from the pack? Is it something measurable? Intangible? Or purely results-driven?

All opinions are appreciated. Thanks everyone!

-D.J.
#makes #salesperson #superstar
  • Profile picture of the author Synnuh
    I haven't read that thread yet, but it will be one of the first in the morning.

    I think confidence, not overthinking it, being driven by something greater than themselves, and downright hungry for success in whatever terms they define it as is a part of what makes a rock star. There's a lot that goes into what keeps guys at the top, though.

    Every guy I've known that's killing it has a certain look in their eyes, and a don't give a fxck smile that generally sums up their attitude on the situation they're in.

    I think the skills can be learned by anyone with the right outside influences coupled with the right internal motivations but it's another 1% at the top (the naturals), 5% nipping at their heels (the hard workers), then the other 94% trying to hack it -- you've really gotta want it to be successful if you aren't naturally born with it.

    The guys I've seen raking it in big didn't have to learn it I don't think. Selling big is just another day in the park for them and what they expect themselves to do when they show up for work.
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  • Profile picture of the author Barry Unruh
    There was a good discussion about this in this thread, also:

    http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...xtroverts.html
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  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
    Originally Posted by DJ Gelner View Post


    I'm intrigued that Ewen could identify a superstar after a few weeks--what set him apart from the pack? Is it something measurable? Intangible? Or purely results-driven?

    -D.J.
    Here you go, listen in, take notes
    and come back and do it again and again
    so you get it into to your core.

    Now, remember, you still have to have an excellent opportunity
    put in front of them so they keep motivated to stay.

    Best,
    Doctor E. Vile

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  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    A super salesperson must be confident and outgoing. They must love to chat to anybody, including strangers, from all walks of life.
    They need to have plenty of positive experiences AND lots of rejections because each rejection is an opportunity to do better and learn why they didn't sell.

    They need powerful motivation, and not just the smell of money.
    They need to be able to "read" people, whether it's in person or on the phone. (Obviously this is a bit different if it's purely online with no direct communication by voice.)

    They must bounce out of bed to go to work each day and love their job or they can't succeed.

    I am sure there are other attributes as well but that's a starter anyway.
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  • Profile picture of the author rseigel
    Interesting question.

    I'm considered a "superstar" by my peers.

    1) I'm introverted by nature - I simply "flip the switch" when I'm in front of a customer. None of customers would ever guess this.
    2) I'm generally not outgoing. In my personal life I'm a more quiet kind of guy. You can't be larger than life all the time.
    3) I am motivated purely by MONEY and no other thing. I don't care about recognition, status or accolades - just the size of my bank account. Full stop!

    Now I CAN read people easily, I'm super confident and I KNOW for a fact that on any given day I can sell anyone and everyone. I don't listen to NOs and truly believe that they are just the path to the final YES. I couldn't possibly care less about rejection and I never take it personally.

    Sales is just one big fasten-your-seatbelt kinda game to me. I love it.

    Just some random thoughts....everything isn't always as it appears.
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    Cheers,

    Ron

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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by rseigel View Post

      Interesting question.

      I'm considered a "superstar" by my peers.

      1) I'm introverted by nature - I simply "flip the switch" when I'm in front of a customer. None of customers would ever guess this.
      2) I'm generally not outgoing. In my personal life I'm a more quiet kind of guy. You can't be larger than life all the time.
      3) I am motivated purely by MONEY and no other thing. I don't care about recognition, status or accolades - just the size of my bank account. Full stop!

      Now I CAN read people easily, I'm super confident and I KNOW for a fact that on any given day I can sell anyone and everyone. I don't listen to NOs and truly believe that they are just the path to the final YES. I couldn't possibly care less about rejection and I never take it personally.

      Sales is just one big fasten-your-seatbelt kinda game to me. I love it.

      Just some random thoughts....everything isn't always as it appears.
      Interesting. I'm also a Superstar.
      1) While not truly introverted, I avoid social situations. I also switch it on in front of customers.
      2) I'm motivated by performance. At first it was money, then I just wanted to get better at selling. It was nice to top sales charts, but mostly, I just had performance goals I wanted to exceed. Twice in my life, I decided, "I'm going to see if I can sell every person on this street". And I did.

      Reading people is easier for me than most. (A skill born out of necessity) I also don't listen to the word "no", unless the body language and context tell me I'm wasting my time.

      Rejection doesn't bother me, but I also don't get excited when I sell. To me, it's all part of the same process. I expect people to buy. I expect to get the sale. And that's one of the real secrets.

      We have a few Superstars here. I know it.

      I've worked beside Superstar salespeople. I've trained a few. They come in all shapes and sizes, all demeanors, all different variety of vices. But they have a few things in common;

      1) Absolute belief in themselves. They are strong, in their core.
      2) Ability to learn from their missed sales.
      3) Ability to think on their feet.
      4) Ability (innate or learned) to adapt to at least most buyers.
      5) Conviction that the prospect should buy, and that they should make the sale.
      6) Ability (innate or adopted) to rebound from rejection and setbacks very quickly.
      7) The quality of taking responsibility for whether the sales was made or not.
      8) Singleness of purpose. They are there to sell.


      You'll be able to see these qualities within a few weeks. And you will see the qualities they don't have, even faster.
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    • Profile picture of the author dreamer123
      Originally Posted by rseigel View Post

      Interesting question.

      I'm considered a "superstar" by my peers.

      1) I'm introverted by nature - I simply "flip the switch" when I'm in front of a customer. None of customers would ever guess this.
      2) I'm generally not outgoing. In my personal life I'm a more quiet kind of guy. You can't be larger than life all the time.
      3) I am motivated purely by MONEY and no other thing. I don't care about recognition, status or accolades - just the size of my bank account. Full stop!

      Now I CAN read people easily, I'm super confident and I KNOW for a fact that on any given day I can sell anyone and everyone. I don't listen to NOs and truly believe that they are just the path to the final YES. I couldn't possibly care less about rejection and I never take it personally.

      Sales is just one big fasten-your-seatbelt kinda game to me. I love it.

      Just some random thoughts....everything isn't always as it appears.
      How do you "flip the switch?" Btw you are a huge inspiration to me as I'm an introvert too and in sales. You've made it big I'm trying too. I've had a few chats with top performing introverted salespeople and they all say what you have said. They "flip the switch" but how do you do that exactly?

      I sooo look forward to your reply!
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      • Profile picture of the author Barry Unruh
        Originally Posted by dreamer123 View Post

        How do you "flip the switch?" Btw you are a huge inspiration to me as I'm an introvert too and in sales. You've made it big I'm trying too. I've had a few chats with top performing introverted salespeople and they all say what you have said. They "flip the switch" but how do you do that exactly?

        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        During the presentation, I may laugh, look concerned, listen closely, give empathetic answers, joke with the customer.........but all that disappeared the minute I left. I never thought about the buyer again. It wasn't because I was mean, or elitist. It was because it was a performance.
        Re-read what Claude said.

        Part of flipping the switch is going into your performance persona. You leave behind your "at home" persona and start your act.

        Don't tell me you can't do it, either... Think about how you react differently when you are with good friends, at church, in the Doctor's office, or when a police officer strolls up to your car...

        In each of those situations you behave differently, because that's what you expect of yourself, and what you believe others expect of you.

        Develop a persona for your sales performance, whether in person or on the phone, that matches your needs...Play with it..test it..make it a game.
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  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    @Ron. I know that there are always exceptions to every rule.
    My description is more based on my experience in sales and the people I have managed or met. It's why every person on the planet is different in some ways and the same in others.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jonwebb
      The best salesman have a system that they have confidence in that system. Product knowledge is nice but if you have a system, you can sell anything.

      Sure they maybe share traits that goes into making them better than average, but i think those traits are also what makes superstars in general, not just sales superstars.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    This thread has some discussion on the topic

    http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...-momentum.html


    Regular people, even "high achievers", would stop working as soon as they hit their revenue target. Even if it was at the middle of the month.

    Those with the best "Sales DNA" kept ringing doorbells.
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    • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
      From real live everyday experience here is what I discovered. When people learned they had to work for it, they no longer wanted it. That, to me, is why there are superstar sales people.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Regular people, even "high achievers", would stop working as soon as they hit their revenue target. Even if it was at the middle of the month.
      I've found that to be true. In fact, the only thing that raised my "comfort zone" was marketing that forced my income to raise, despite my lack of effort. Then, eventually that became my new comfort zone.
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    • Profile picture of the author BigFrank
      Banned
      I can only speak for myself as it applied to my telemarketing career.

      1. The ability to recognize an excellent opportunity for high compensation through a presentation and formula that can lead to success if I applied my personal skill-set to the very best of my ability.

      2. The good sense to strictly adhere to a proven success formula in the precise manner I was taught until I achieved success, while never faltering or assuming that I knew more than the man that hired me by deviating in any way.

      3. The courage to work on a strictly commission basis, from day one.

      4. The willingness to be the first man in and the last man out, every single day.

      5. The commitment to dial more times than anyone else in the room, day in and day out.

      6. The perception required so that the nano-second I could sense that someone was going to say, 'no' - to hang up and call someone that was waiting for my call so they could say, 'yes.'

      7. The good sense to educate the person that I was calling so that the next time I, or someone else in the room called them, they'd be that much closer to saying, 'yes.'

      8. By always displaying the highest level of respect and professionalism toward anyone I spoke with, regardless of how they treated me.

      9. A willingness to attempt to set an example of work ethic and to teach those around me everything I could to improve their level of success, if they were interested in being helped.

      10. To use all of the preceding to establish myself as the top producer in every room I have ever worked in within 30 days of arriving and not letting the negativity of those I supplanted to do anything more than my wanting to rub their nose in my success by making them look like mere pikers with each passing week. I am not a nice person in a competitive environment. Well, some folks think I'm never a nice person. lol

      As a room manager I added:

      1. The ability to smell bullshit a mile away.

      2. The desire to reward those that were doing the best at displaying how to do the job, even if they had not yet reached the level of success that I thought they would, when I hired them. Some things take more time.

      3. Knowing whom to hire for the express purpose of firing them in dramatic fashion, thereby whipping everyone else in the room back into shape, if they were getting lax. Yes, even telemarketers are human, or so I've been told.

      4. Be willing to stay as long as the last guy dialing wanted to stay to bang another deal to get themselves to the next commission break. More money for them meant more money for me and it also let them know I would never turn my back on them.

      5. Taking the time to prove to people that were once successful, that were falling down, that they could be even more successful than before, if they would simply do what they were doing in the first place, before going off the reservation.

      6. The ability to communicate to even the most fearful telemarketing recruit that in the right hands, there is not a more powerful weapon on the planet, than a telephone handset and if they would follow my lead for 2 weeks, I would prove to them that they could make great money and learn a skill that would enable them to go anywhere in the country and be able to provide for themselves and their family in good style.

      7. Having the understanding that people are generally born with the requisite traits to achieve Superstar status, but until they are placed in a situation where they can utilize those skills to demonstrate a level of success they may not know they can achieve - they are nothing more than an 'Average Joe."

      Why are you staring at the phone? We don't get incoming calls, around here! Pick up the phone and make some money. It's not called, 'Dialing for dollars,' as some kind of joke.

      Telemarketing is not easy, but it is simple to succeed at. :-)

      Cheers. - Frank
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  • Profile picture of the author TrumpiaTim
    A few things I look for in a good salesperson:

    1) Passion for sales
    2) Passion for industry/company that they will be working for
    3) General relationship skills
    4) Listening skills
    5) Ability to assert themselves at the right time
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  • Profile picture of the author eccj
    Ok, this is going to sound stupid BUT in my experience of watching superstars this is what I have noticed.

    Superstars are outside of what is happening in he actual sale. It is kind of like It's A Wonderful Life where George Bailey is being taken around by Clarence, his angel, and they are watching scenes of George Bailey's life.

    For the great salesmen, it is like they are sitting up in the sky watching the sales process. They are not bothered by what is happening with the prospect, it is all cerebral. Is the prospect thinking to hard? Then turn up the emotion. IS the prospect too emotional and not thinking straight, turn up the logic.

    They guy sitting up in the sky can figure out how to make a deal happen and he usually does.

    There is a lot to being a great salesman but this is what I think makes the difference between the good ones and the great ones.

    Of course there are other ways to be a top salesmen; get a great system, see a ton of people, etc.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by eccj View Post

      Ok, this is going to sound stupid BUT in my experience of watching superstars this is what I have noticed.

      Superstars are outside of what is happening in he actual sale. It is kind of like It's A Wonderful Life where George Bailey is being taken around by Clarence, his angel, and they are watching scenes of George Bailey's life.

      For the great salesmen, it is like they are sitting up in the sky watching the sales process. They are not bothered by what is happening with the prospect, it is all cerebral. Is the prospect thinking to hard? Then turn up the emotion. IS the prospect too emotional and not thinking straight, turn up the logic.

      They guy sitting up in the sky can figure out how to make a deal happen and he usually does.

      There is a lot to being a great salesman but this is what I think makes the difference between the good ones and the great ones.

      Of course there are other ways to be a top salesmen; get a great system, see a ton of people, etc.

      Wow. Honestly, for years, I thought I was the only one.

      Yes, I'm both participant and observer. I'm never really engaged with the prospect. It's always cerebral. All emotion in the presentation, is a means to an end. It's like playing chess. Thinking a few moves ahead, deciphering what they really mean when they speak. Anticipating problems.

      When I took salespeople with me, it constantly amazed me that they would get wrapped up in the sale, involved in what was happening. After the presentation, I would ask them what they thought was happening (at a specific point). They never understood what I was asking.

      When selling, I never took the results personally. I only thought about how I lost the sale, or what I learned that I could use in the future.

      During the presentation, I may laugh, look concerned, listen closely, give empathetic answers, joke with the customer.........but all that disappeared the minute I left. I never thought about the buyer again. It wasn't because I was mean, or elitist. It was because it was a performance.

      I never got angry when they didn't buy. I never got angry when they insulted me. It's because I wasn't really involved with them.

      Hundreds of times, a customer would see me in a store, or around town. They would walk up to me, and strike up a conversation. They think we are friends. I can fake my way through it usually. But I never remember them. If I really want to remember them, I ask for their address. I can remember the house, usually.

      I have psychopathic thinking processes. I always assumed that my perceptions when selling, were due to that. And the absolutely best salesperson I ever met, (in vacuum cleaner sales) was a woman who is a psychopath....just disconnected from human interplay.
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      • Profile picture of the author BigFrank
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        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        I only thought about how I lost the sale, or what I learned that I could use in the future.
        A sale is never lost. Just slightly delayed. :-)

        Cheers. - Frank
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by BigFrank View Post

          A sale is never lost. Just slightly delayed. :-)

          Cheers. - Frank

          Dearest Darling Frank;

          I'm going to pretend that I'm explaining something you don't already know.

          In the presentation, the sale can be delayed. In fact, I remember a trainee asking me, "What if they absolutely have decided they are not going to buy, before you get there?". I said, "The sale will take about 30 minutes longer". And they then asked, "But what if they hate salespeople, and have vowed never to buy from another salesman?"....I said, "Then the sale will take 45 minutes longer".

          But after the presentation? I never make another attempt. I know that there are sales later, with repeated attempt. It's a personal choice.
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          • Profile picture of the author BigFrank
            Banned
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            Dearest Darling Frank;
            I long for you, too, Cuddles.
            I'm going to pretend that I'm explaining something you don't already know.
            Pretending is good. :-) (Much like when the Mrs. has an orgasmic display).
            In the presentation, the sale can be delayed. In fact, I remember a trainee asking me, "What if they absolutely have decided they are not going to buy, before you get there?". I said, "The sale will take about 30 minutes longer". And they then asked, "But what if they hate salespeople, and have vowed never to buy from another salesman?"....I said, "Then the sale will take 45 minutes longer".

            But after the presentation? I never make another attempt. I know that there are sales later, with repeated attempt. It's a personal choice.
            Understood, but I'll pretend that you don't already know that it of course depends on what you are trying to sell. You offer a tangible product with easily demonstrated benefits. My experience is mainly, although not completely limited to intangible products, with absolutely no easily discernible benefits other than those I can create an illusion of, in my prospect's mind. :-)

            Additionally, I haunt their world until they either buy, or die!

            Cheers. - Frank
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            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by BigFrank View Post

              I long for you, too, Cuddles.
              Pretending is good. :-)
              Understood, but I'll pretend that you don't already know that it of course depends on what you are trying to sell. You offer a tangible product with easily demonstrated benefits. My experience is mainly, although not completely limited to intangible products, with absolutely no easily discernible benefits other than those I can create an illusion of, in my prospect's mind. :-)

              Additionally, I haunt their world until they either buy, or die!

              Cheers. - Frank
              Big (I feel we can be on a first name basis)

              I understand that completely. Selling a service by phone, you would call repeatedly. Their attitudes change, their emotions change. The person answering the phone changes. And their fortunes change.

              Your type of selling is the more intelligent way. It generates more sales, and greater profits. I just give a prospect the best possible shot. If they don't buy, they are pretty exhausted with me, when I leave. And callbacks are generally unprofitable.

              In retail, I'm a more gentle person. People do come back.
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              • Profile picture of the author BigFrank
                Banned
                Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                Big (I feel we can be on a first name basis)
                Lets give that a try and see how it works out.
                I understand that completely. Selling a service by phone, you would call repeatedly. Their attitudes change, their emotions change. The person answering the phone changes. And their fortunes change.
                And with luck, I'm in a better mood than the last time I called them. It's possible.
                Your type of selling is the more intelligent way.
                Especially if you look like me. Telemarketing is 'sales for ugly people.'
                It generates more sales, and greater profits. I just give a prospect the best possible shot. If they don't buy, they are pretty exhausted with me, when I leave. And callbacks are generally unprofitable.

                In retail, I'm a more gentle person. People do come back.
                Agreed. :-)

                Cheers. - Frank
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  • Profile picture of the author Barry Unruh
    Suggestion: You can practice building a persona by taking cold calls and playing roles with the salespeople.

    I'm not suggesting jerking their chains, but try on different levels of excitement, different tones of voice, practice standing and moving around, practice asking more questions, or being the silent listener. See how the salesperson reacts...

    Suggestion 2: Practice in the grocery store.

    Play a different role when you are shopping. Try to be the guy who says "Hi" to everyone, smiles, and has a lot of pep in your step.

    With a little practice, you can "flip the switch"
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  • Profile picture of the author rseigel
    Yeah...what Barry said.

    I'm very visual so in my mind, while I"m approaching the customer's door (I only work by appointment - no door to door) I literally in my mind turn my sales guy switch on. I am a completely different person on a sales call (schizo anyone?!?).

    I personally don't think this is something you can practice. I'm more of a do it live kinda guy so I've developed it over lots of years of sales calls.

    My wife has literally never met the true sales guy in me. Drives her nuts but I can't turn it on until I'm in a real sales situation. Without it I would be a lousy sales guy.
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    Ron

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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by rseigel View Post

      My wife has literally never met the true sales guy in me. Drives her nuts but I can't turn it on until I'm in a real sales situation. Without it I would be a lousy sales guy.
      I made the mistake of taking my wife with me on a few sales calls. This is before our retail store. She said, on the drive home, "I didn't know you were so interested in archery".

      I said, "I'm not. Not at all. But he was interested in archery. I was just listening attentively".

      What's strange, is that I don't use my sales persona when consulting. So, when someone sees me speak to a group, and they hire me for consulting, they get a different guy. I'm much more serious and reserved in person.
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  • Profile picture of the author tryinhere
    I think you can add time as to one of the things a superstar might have. In many cases out of the bat any pitch or approach, can be anywhere from OK to very good, but given time top performers pull it apart even more and look to perfect every floor to improve, and there really is no limit to the depth that can be taken as most good people will dissect each presentation to see what went wrong and how to fix it for the next time or how to improve the order and or flow, this can take many months and if not into years to develop and perfect.

    Trying to improve never really stops and they become masters over time in their given field.
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  • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
    Hunger. That is it.

    If they are hungry enough, they will read what I tell them to read, listen to what I tell them to listen to, say what I tell them to say, and call who they need to call.

    I don't care much about personality types (though there are distinct patterns) - all I care about is hunger.

    I don't care about past experience - I care about hunger.

    I make it very clear to anyone who wants to work for me - "The hungry are fed." If someone stops being hungry - they might as well stay home.

    I'm the hungriest person I know. If you want to succeed - you gotta feel it deep inside. To the extent you lose the hunger, you will slow down. Eventually you must retire, close the biz, or get a job - because without hunger, you have nothing.
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  • Profile picture of the author robwilliam
    I didn't read the thread ye but A super salesman must be supportive and must have the experience in selling. He must be friendly and don't be with a shy nature. Yes, one thing is sure that nobody can teach you selling skills; it comes from heart and every person have selling skills in him but only few is use it for growth or as a career. Yes, one can make better his selling skills by learning some techniques but they are only to support or assist you. You will be successful in the selling only when you love it.
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    • Profile picture of the author tryinhere
      Originally Posted by robwilliam View Post

      I didn't read the thread ye but A super salesman must be supportive and must have the experience in selling. He must be friendly and don't be with a shy nature. Yes, one thing is sure that nobody can teach you selling skills; it comes from heart and every person have selling skills in him but only few is use it for growth or as a career. Yes, one can make better his selling skills by learning some techniques but they are only to support or assist you. You will be successful in the selling only when you love it.
      How exactly is it possible to state that nobody can teach you selling skills, but then say if you learn one can make better his selling ? Unless you suggest people spent an entire lifetime living in a bubble and only learn from their own ways ?
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      • Profile picture of the author Freebiequeen1999
        Originally Posted by tryinhere View Post

        How exactly is it possible to state that nobody can teach you selling skills, but then say if you learn one can make better his selling ? Unless you suggest people spent an entire lifetime living in a bubble and only learn from their own ways ?

        Aww...those pesky translation programs can mess up some good advice )
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  • Profile picture of the author rseigel
    To say "nobody can teach you selling skills" is beyond ridiculous. Clearly not written by a sales superstar.

    "You will be successful in the selling only when you love it" is equally preposterous. I've worked jobs that I hated in sales but did them because the money was stupid.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by rseigel View Post

      To say "nobody can teach you selling skills" is beyond ridiculous. Clearly not written by a sales superstar.

      "You will be successful in the selling only when you love it" is equally preposterous. I've worked jobs that I hated in sales but did them because the money was stupid.
      I ignored it, and wondered if someone was going to comment.

      "Nobody can teach you selling skills" is as silly as "Nobody can teach you how to be a doctor".

      And the idea of "You will be successful in the selling only when you love it".....Yup, said by people that aren't making good money selling. It's because, to a layman..it sounds so very true. It must be true, right?


      Personally (I would never say this to a prospect), I don't enjoy selling, and I never have. I've never sold a product that really excited me. And the hardest part of training, was faking enthusiasm (because I knew new people needed it).

      To me, it was highly complex social engineering. And I never felt an ounce of enthusiasm. Dealing with people all day, that you would never spend ten minutes with socially, isn't fun. Listening to the exact same objection, 10,000 times...and giving the same answer 10,000 times..is boring. The only thing interesting to me, was learning a new method, a better technique. Anything to make selling more painless.

      I do enjoy teaching how to sell. Seeing a new guy use what I've taught them to make a sale, gives a sense of satisfaction. Consulting is fun, because I'm teaching.

      But every time I have to smile for 30 minutes, as an old lady tells me about her cat's diet...I die a little inside. To me, selling has always been a performance. It's acting. I can't remember ever really feeling what I've said to a customer. They are talking to a character I play.
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  • Profile picture of the author RTSteam
    For me a good sales person would be a person who would always find an opportunity to make a sale.
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    • Profile picture of the author rseigel
      Originally Posted by RTSteam View Post

      For me a good sales person would be a person who would always find an opportunity to make a sale.
      Wow! Thanks Captain Obvious. Any other earth shattering tips for us?
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      Cheers,

      Ron

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    • Profile picture of the author Barry Unruh
      Originally Posted by RTSteam View Post

      For me a good sales person would be a person who would always find an opportunity to make a sale.
      Really?

      I can find you thousands of salespeople who can find the "opportunity" to make a sale, but only a handful who know how to close that sale.
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      Brain Drained...Signature Coming Soon!
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  • Profile picture of the author NilimaSarasvati
    Banned
    No one can make much profit then salesperson if they doing the job of more energetic and talkative and gain attention of listener and to convince anyone to give their valuable time to listen their words and such can make star.
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  • Profile picture of the author mktmaverick
    One tip mentioned in Secrets of the Rainmakers book is: Instead of delivering your sales pitch first listen to your potential client needs. You might deliver a better sales pitch once you know what your prospect needs.

    Cheers!
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    I sell high traffic premium domains, I used to have it on my signature but got removed. If you are interested to see my catalog, pm me.

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