8 replies
  • SEO
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I am wondering if anybody on here knows of a service that provides links on EDU sites. My account is too new to post a url example so if you IM me I can send you an example of the site.
Or if you know how to create these types of pages. Any help is appreciated.
#links
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by kicksetc View Post

    I am wondering if anybody on here knows of a service that provides links on EDU sites.
    Hi, welcome to the forum.

    There are many advertised online, including maybe some here (try a search for ".edu backlinks"?

    But don't imagine that they're worth anything extra just because they're backlinks on .edu domains. That isn't how it works at all.

    Domain-extensions have no bearing, in themselves, either on SEO or on the value of backlinks. It's perfectly true, of course, that many .edu backlinks are very good backlinks to get, but correlation isn't causation, and it's not the fact that they're on .edu pages that, in itself, confers any "extra benefit" at all.

    The point here is simply that many (by no means all!) .edu sites are also, at least to some extent, authority sites, and that's what makes their backlinks valuable ones.

    Other .edu pages aren't "authority sites" at all.

    I have a couple of .edu blogs, myself, but sadly their backlinks are worth no more than a backlink from any of my .com, .info or any other sites, and in fact usually worth quite a bit less, because some of my main .info/.com sites are now building up quite a bit of "authority" and some of their pages are building up some higher PR's, too.

    So don't imagine that "being on a .edu site" necessarily makes a backlink better than any other sort of backlink. Sadly.

    The analogy that always springs to mind, in this context, is the belief that having a "blog" rather than a "non-blog website" is going to confer extra SEO/backlink benefit "because Google loves blogs". Again, the logic here is pretty mistaken, and in the same way: it's the attribution of causation that's at fault. The reality, in this case, is simply that "Google loves regularly updated websites", and a lot of blogs do happen to be regularly updated websites. Again, correlation is not causation.

    If you have a niche site about arthritis remedies, for example, a .edu backlink from a university's/med-school's rheumatology site is going to be potential gold-dust, while a student forum or blog which - like so many - is non-context-relevant and PR-0 will actually be no better at all than any other random non-context-relevant, PR-0 backlink such as an article directory.

    Contrary to popular belief, it isn't the "being on a .edu site" aspect of it that gives any advantage.

    Call me a skepchick, but (as with so many other things in internet marketing) if you ask people selling them, of course, you may hear a slightly different story. :p
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    • Profile picture of the author arnold55
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      Hi, welcome to the forum.

      There are many advertised online, including maybe some here (try a search for ".edu backlinks"?

      But don't imagine that they're worth anything extra just because they're backlinks on .edu domains. That isn't how it works at all.

      Domain-extensions have no bearing, in themselves, either on SEO or on the value of backlinks. It's perfectly true, of course, that many .edu backlinks are very good backlinks to get, but correlation isn't causation, and it's not the fact that they're on .edu pages that, in itself, confers any "extra benefit" at all.

      The point here is simply that many (by no means all!) .edu sites are also, at least to some extent, authority sites, and that's what makes their backlinks valuable ones.

      Other .edu pages aren't "authority sites" at all.

      I have a couple of .edu blogs, myself, but sadly their backlinks are worth no more than a backlink from any of my .com, .info or any other sites, and in fact usually worth quite a bit less, because some of my main .info/.com sites are now building up quite a bit of "authority" and some of their pages are building up some higher PR's, too.

      So don't imagine that "being on a .edu site" necessarily makes a backlink better than any other sort of backlink. Sadly.

      The analogy that always springs to mind, in this context, is the belief that having a "blog" rather than a "non-blog website" is going to confer extra SEO/backlink benefit "because Google loves blogs". Again, the logic here is pretty mistaken, and in the same way: it's the attribution of causation that's at fault. The reality, in this case, is simply that "Google loves regularly updated websites", and a lot of blogs do happen to be regularly updated websites. Again, correlation is not causation.

      If you have a niche site about arthritis remedies, for example, a .edu backlink from a university's/med-school's rheumatology site is going to be potential gold-dust, while a student forum or blog which - like so many - is non-context-relevant and PR-0 will actually be no better at all than any other random non-context-relevant, PR-0 backlink such as an article directory.

      Contrary to popular belief, it isn't the "being on a .edu site" aspect of it that gives any advantage.

      Call me a skepchick, but (as with so many other things in internet marketing) if you ask people selling them, of course, you may hear a slightly different story. :p
      All true, "but"
      if you want to see for yourself, go to fiverr and spend the five bucks just search under edu/gov links. Look for a "top rated seller" and make a purchase. One good thing is you will also get a text file of all of the edu/gov websites that you were linked to. You can douse this list for yourself in the future.

      arnold55
      mike reynolds
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  • Profile picture of the author frankl
    I wouldn't worry about .edu links if i were you. They are no better backlinks than any other.
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  • Profile picture of the author raegrex
    you could try Fiverr, i bought a package and i'm still waiting to see how it goes. but from what i heard they are some decent services for 5 bucks
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  • Profile picture of the author ezmystic
    find a good .edu with a comments section and post some comments with a link
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  • Profile picture of the author HarrisonJ
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author RimaNaj2011
      I don't stress too much getting them. I'm a college student and all students get their own "webpage" part of the school domain. So what I have is complete control over a subpage of a PR 8 domain. I write a short blurb and link to my money site and I blast that .edu site with UAW. It's like my own BMR network

      That's all I do for .edu links
      Signature

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  • Profile picture of the author creativesnaps
    Thanks for explaining the back link process better and the value of .edu links

    I am trying to promote my wedding photography website creativesnaps.biz and I am reading all the information I can

    Thanks, has really helped
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Ketcham
    My advice is don't focus on .edu, your time is better spent on getting quality links from sites relative to your topic or keyword. For example, if your site is about dive lights, you want scuba or diving related sites linking to you, not some random .edu site on an unrelated topic. Good luck.
    Signature
    LED Dive Lights - See the underwater world.
    Underwater Kinetics Dive Lights - Rugged and reliable.
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