Some stuff to think about...

by max5ty
28 replies
I read How To Write A Good Advertisement by Victor Schwab (again).

I try to reread the classics once a year so I can keep my head clear of all the mumbo jumbo that's out there.

Anyways, thought I'd do a little recap of some interesting things in the book. Things you can use in the new year to get back on track - or maybe just brush up.

If you don't know who Victor Schwab is ... he's the copywriter that made "Think And Grow Rich" a best seller. He was also the copywriter behind the Charles Atlas ads - among a whole list of other things.

"I see that you've spent quite a big wad of dough to tell me the things you think I should know.
How your practice is so big, so fine and strong ... and your history so rich and long.
So you started your practice in '82? How tremendously interesting that is to you.
You built up the thing with the sweat and blood of your life. I'll run home like mad and tell that to my wife.
Your equipment is modern and, oh, so complete! Your "rep" is so flawless; your employees so neat.
Your motto is "Quality" with capital "Q" ... damn, I'm getting tired of hearing about "you."
So tell me quick and tell me true ... or else my friend, to hell with you!
Less about you and your practice and how it came to be... and more about what you can do for Me."

Here are some of the lessons in the book I believe everyone should follow (ad refers to anything you are using to sell a product) -

Do not underestimate the fierce competition you face in getting attention. Nobody in the world (except you) is waiting for your advertisement to appear. Everybody in the world (except you) would much rather read the news, comics, stories, articles, editorials or even the obituaries.

Successful advertisers purposely start from this premise: People don't want to read advertising--not even mine. Then they work their way around this 8-ball by shooting that much harder for advertisements that, as Arthur Brisbane defined good writing, is "easier to read than to skip." They try to offer so enticing a "reward for reading" that people will want to read their advertisements right through --against any competition, editorial or commercial.

Good advertising is described as "building up a bright picture of value in the reader's mind which outshines the picture of price" -

Schwab says we don't write ads to get the admiration of the public...we write them for one purpose only - to sell.

There are 5 fundamentals of writing a good ad:

Get attention
Show people an advantage
Prove it
Persuade people to grasp this advantage
Ask for action

Moving on- about the headline:

It's the headline that gets people into the copy; the copy doesn't get them into the headline. In other words, the copywriter's aim in life should be to try to make it harder for people to pass up his advertisement than to read it. And right in his headline he takes the first, and truly giant, step on the road to that goal.

A headline should promise a worthwhile goal for reading further..."

1. By managing to convey, in a few words, how the reader can save, gain, or accomplish something through the use of your product--how it will increase this: his mental, physical, financial, social, emotional, or spiritual stimulation, satisfaction, well-being, or security.

2. Or, negatively, by pointing out how the reader can avoid (reduce or eliminate) risks, worries, losses, mistakes, embarrassment, drudgery, or some other undesirable condition through the use of your product--how it will decrease this: his fear of poverty, illness, or accident, discomfort, boredom, and the loss of business or social prestige or advancement.

Schwab says in his book that often people will fight harder to retain something they already have than they will to fight for something they don't yet have.

A couple examples I thought of are: They don't want to waste their money on things. They don't want to lose their health, etc.

He goes on to say the length of the headline doesn't matter as long as it conveys the message you want to get across. He also points out that a lot of successful headlines contain the word you, or some form of it.

He then goes on to say there are 3 things advertising can tell it's readers: 1. What the product is. 2. What the product does. And 3 (which is often overlooked) - because of what your product can do for me, others will see me in a certain way. Example: They'll think more highly of me. They'll think I'm better looking. They'll think I'm important.

If you can get your reader to use the 3rd step above, your sales will greatly increase.

He says that once you capture their eye, you must capture their mind with your body copy.

You must answer "What will your product do for me?" You HAVE TO show your reader an advantage they will gain - and keep showing them.

To write good copy you must be able to place yourself on both sides of the counter. You must be able to see things the way your customers see them.

"Nothing of yours ever seems half so important to me (the consumer) as it does to you. Millions of advertising dollars are wasted every year because what I want to hear has nothing to do with what you want to say."

Your body copy should contain EVERY advantage your product offers your customer.

"If you will tie up the advantages of your product with what people want to gain, be, do, and save, you will make them want to buy."

"People Want to GAIN... (1) Health (2) Time (3) Money (4) Popularity (5) Improved appearance (6) Security in old age (7) Praise from others (8) Comfort (9) Leisure (10) Pride of accomplishment (11) Advancement: business, social (12) Increased enjoyment (13) Self-confidence (14) Personal prestige.

They Want to BE... (1) Good parents (2) Sociable, hospitable (3) Up-to-date (4) Creative (5) Proud of their possessions (6) Influential over others (7) Gregarious (8) Efficient (9) "First" in things (10) Recognized as authorities.

They want to DO... (1) Express their personalities (2) Resist domination by others (3) Satisfy their curiosity (4) Emulate the admirable (5) Appreciate beauty (6) Acquire or collect things (7) Win others' affection (8) Improve themselves generally.

They Want to SAVE... (1) Time (2) Money (3) Work (4) Discomfort (5) Worry (6) Doubts (7) Risks (8) Personal embarrassment."


Schwab goes on to talk about your first paragraph in your copy:

You should Follow through with the idea or appeal expressed in the main headline--which is what attracted the reader in the first place.

Be short, with quick, easy-to-read sentences; entice the reader to stay with you into the paragraphs which follow. Perhaps start with a question, one so pertinent or challenging as to grip the reader's interest at once and impel him to keep reading to find the answer.

Start immediately to carry out the reward-for-reading promise made in your headline.

Compress into this paragraph a few of the major advantages of your product. Don't clutter it up with minor claims. In the words of Jim Young, "There are many ways to start an ad, but one of the best, if not the best, is to tell the reader how to get something he already wants."

Schwab says your first paragraph is your most important. If you lose the reader in your opening, you've lost them for good.

Moving on to proof...

Schwab says many advertisements filled with good emotional-appeal copy fail because they do not contain any, or enough, "prove it" facts to carry conviction. Likewise, many advertisements filled with good proof material fail because their emotional-appeal copy is not strong enough to motivate the reader to act. Both factors are needed, for one helps the other along the road toward the goal of action.

He says people need facts and want facts as reasons and excuses for buying--in order to justify to themselves (and to others) a decision which may be based on their emotions alone.

Appeal-to-reason copy actually increases the persuasiveness of appeal-to-emotion copy.

So I'm running out of time on this article. I'll try and come back in a few days and cover the persuasion part and the ask for the sale part.

In the meantime, I'd highly recommend you read the entire book. It was written in the 60's I believe, but it's still relevant for our time.
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  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    Thanks for the great summary.

    Pity so many business owners can get over their egos. I still toss out mail pieces from people who do not understand I am more important than they are.
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    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by DABK View Post


      Pity so many business owners can get over their egos. I still toss out mail pieces from people who do not understand I am more important than they are.
      If more businesses could just grasp this concept - they'd see their sales greatly increase.

      I notice this more from small businesses which of course make up the majority of businesses.

      They'll do ads with their business name in the headline.

      They'll put front and center how long they've been in business.

      They'll tell you how great their customer service is.

      Pretty much a copy and paste of all the other small businesses.

      Any marketer with even limited knowledge can greatly increase ROI just by simply changing these lousy ads to make the customer the hero.
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    • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
      Originally Posted by DABK View Post

      Thanks for the great summary.

      Pity so many business owners can get over their egos. I still toss out mail pieces from people who do not understand I am more important than they are.
      There are today, an estimated 40,000+ people who refer to themselves as copy writers, albeit, most think content is the same thing or just a variation of it.

      Writing ads became a popular Biz-Op back in the 90's (prior to that it was sort of a hidden one), when a few savvy guys found they could make more moolah from the miners than from the mine.

      And the beat goes on. Groups on Facebook have 30,000+ members, there are thousands of freelancers listed on Upwork, Freelancer, Fiverr, etc.

      YET, the most asked question among these Persuaders of Print, is, HOW do I get clients?

      That and how do I convince the Biz owner he/she is wrong, and I am the expert or giving the client what they asked for and it doesn't work.

      I actually tossed a couple of hours of my most valuable time into the canyon of freelancers and discovered the same thing applies to those calling themselves copywriters as the business owner who thinks it is ALL ABOUT THEM.

      Personally, I think it is a lost cause and I'm OK and even happy about that. Can't say how many of these literate (having read a few books) copywriters can't get anyone to pay them for their "knowledge". They are book smart and street stupid as we used to say.

      I'm a big fan of Schwab and all the old masters as well as the new ones.

      Thanks for starting this thread Max5ty, it is good a reminder for us old timers, even though it may fall on the deaf ears of those who would most benefit from it.

      GordonJ
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      • Profile picture of the author max5ty
        Originally Posted by GordonJ View Post


        ...when a few savvy guys found they could make more moolah from the miners than from the mine.
        haha I love that sentence.

        I may have to swipe that.

        It explains in a few words so many things going on in the online world today.
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        • Profile picture of the author DABK
          A few years ago, someone I knew opened a business in the construction/remodeling arena. He got a website for which he wrote the copy.

          He was very proud of his copy and very confused his phone did not ring of the hook.

          His home page contained the phrase:
          We aim to become the biggest remodeling company in our city.

          Another business owner wants his logo top left on everything.

          The first one ended up changing; the second one refuses, and keeps paying the price. While remaining confused as to why he does not have a bigger market share.

          And I can go on and on. I will just say:
          People are interesting.
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          • Profile picture of the author eccj
            Originally Posted by DABK View Post

            A few years ago, someone I knew opened a business in the construction/remodeling arena. He got a website for which he wrote the copy.

            He was very proud of his copy and very confused his phone did not ring of the hook.

            His home page contained the phrase:
            We aim to become the biggest remodeling company in our city.

            Another business owner wants his logo top left on everything.

            The first one ended up changing; the second one refuses, and keeps paying the price. While remaining confused as to why he does not have a bigger market share.

            And I can go on and on. I will just say:
            People are interesting.
            I look through the two local shared mailers we get. I look for food coupons and look at the quality of the ads for the rest of the magazine.

            Almost all of the ads have the business' name as the headline. THREE had proper headlines and non were in the home services industry. A couple had a call to action and one had a lead capture. Again, none were in the home services industry.

            I imagine the ones who give an actual price instead of a percentage off do the best. But almost all of the ads could only possibly get the attention of someone looking through the magazine with the intent of finding someone to perform some service.

            What would you do? I think I would come up with a USP of some sort the appeals to the upper end of the people looking for a service.
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            • Profile picture of the author max5ty
              Originally Posted by eccj View Post


              I imagine the ones who give an actual price instead of a percentage off do the best.
              A rule in copywriting - although not agreed on by everyone (but most) - and one I've always found to work when deciding whether to give a percent off or a dollar amount off is this:

              First, anything under $100 is usually advertised with a percentage off.

              Anything over $100 is advertised with the amount that SOUNDS greater. Example:

              If you're selling a $300 item, and you advertised it at 25% off - it would sound like a greater value to say $75 off. Even though they're both the same, the higher number sounds like a better deal to the reader.

              I understand this isn't exactly what you were referring to, but it made me think of this rule.

              Also, those advertising their services would probably get a better pull from their ad if they were to make it direct response.

              Example: A housecleaning service instead of going for the hard sale could offer a free booklet on 101 ways to save time on your house cleaning.

              A lawn service could offer a booklet on 25 ways to have the greenest yard in the neighborhood.

              An auto repair service could offer info on how to change your oil the proper way.

              These are just off the top of my head - of course I'd make the offer pretty and more engaging, but hopefully everyone gets the idea. The reason for the offer is that it sets you apart as an authority and also gives you names to use.

              Thanks for your feedback.

              P.S. Looking back over your comment I see you say none were for the home services industry. My comment would still be applicable to any industry.
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          • Profile picture of the author max5ty
            Originally Posted by DABK View Post

            A few years ago, someone I knew opened a business in the construction/remodeling arena. He got a website for which he wrote the copy.

            He was very proud of his copy and very confused his phone did not ring of the hook.

            His home page contained the phrase:
            We aim to become the biggest remodeling company in our city.

            Another business owner wants his logo top left on everything.

            The first one ended up changing; the second one refuses, and keeps paying the price. While remaining confused as to why he does not have a bigger market share.

            And I can go on and on. I will just say:
            People are interesting.
            The problem (one of them) with websites is nobody cares about them.

            We went through a glorious age when everyone was selling websites. Now they're built and nobody cares.

            We have all these disillusioned business owners wondering why nobody came (build it and they will come).

            Now, obviously I'm exaggerating a little because there are websites we visit daily - but -

            they're not the websites that as you eluded to talk about themselves on and on and on.

            YOU HAVE GOT TO give. It's what causes people to see you as an authority on your subject ... but it's one of the hardest ideas for people to grasp.

            The guy that does home remodeling could give away tons of stuff on tips and tricks to remodel your own home. It would show he knows what he's talking about.

            However, most won't do this because they think, "Hell the guy will just remodel his own home after I tell him how to do it". Well, no, that's not true.

            The guy that would do that is going to anyways. The majority of people have no desire to do it ... but they'd immediately think you were the one to hire because you know what you're talking about.

            We could all probably learn how to sew a pair of jeans together. The majority of us aren't going to. If someone told us how we'd think they knew what they were talking about.

            We could buy some iron and weld it together to make a bike - the majority of us never would. If someone told us how we'd think they knew what they were talking about.

            I firmly believe the secret to success is giving.

            Most people realize you can know how to do something, but it still takes skill to do it.

            Anyways, I get long-winded and it's late...or actually early morning and I know I've been droning on.

            Thanks for your comment.
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  • Profile picture of the author sammyanuj
    I am not an aspiring copywriter but am looking to understand what would make a better advertisement for my products. My niche is wedding. I looked at amazon and found a kindle version of the book. Is this the one you are referring here. I just wanted to crosscheck before buying.
    https://www.amazon.com/How-Write-Goo...ustomerReviews
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    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by sammyanuj View Post

      I am not an aspiring copywriter but am looking to understand what would make a better advertisement for my products. My niche is wedding. I looked at amazon and found a kindle version of the book. Is this the one you are referring here. I just wanted to crosscheck before buying.
      https://www.amazon.com/How-Write-Goo...ustomerReviews
      Actually on a side note -

      this brings up an interesting point.

      I noticed on Amazon and other places, there are several people selling this same book with a different cover.

      U.S. Copyright Law says:

      Current US law extends copyright for 70 years after the date of the author's death, and corporate "works-for-hire" are copyrighted for 95 years after publication. But prior to the 1976 Copyright Act (which became effective in 1978), the maximum copyright term was 56 years--an initial term of 28 years, renewable for another 28 years.

      For 1978 to present you can use this:

      https://cocatalog.loc.gov/cgi-bin/Pw...&CNT=25&HIST=1

      Books previous to that we have this:

      https://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ23.pdf

      Yes, I believe that is the same book, along with several others on Amazon with the same title.

      No, it's not the original, but I'd assume the same text.

      Whether the original copyright expired I have no idea...I'd assume it did with so many people changing the cover and selling it - but I'm not an attorney, nor have I researched the copyright.

      Congratulations though on wanting to read the book and learning more.
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  • Shame these old classics ain't available as talkin' books.

    Could be big cash in it for The Rock or Greta Thunberg.

    Plus also I could stream on Google from my bathtub, same as I do with romance novels or my Speak Flooent Latvian course.

    Wouldn't that be fun?

    See, cos I could run The Rock readin' Schwab in my livin' room ... simultaneous with Greta readin' Dan Kennedy in the kitchen ... an' Chris Hemsworth readin' Gary Halbert in the bathroom ...

    which means if I stand in the right place in my hallway, I got my own personal Triumvirate of Tried & Tested Persuasion bombardin' my ass with killer copy smarts 24/7.

    Likely my geeky friends could figure a 3-way Quotation Tennis arrangement featuring The Rock, Greta & Thor barkin' out select Copy Gold Dust wonders in a melee of jusxtapositional excellence.

    But yeah, the see-saw between emotional appeal an' proof is a fine balance to achieve, always.

    A shotgun GUARANTEED to SLAY ALL ENEMIES ain't no use as spatula -- even for a gal would do most anythin' to cook edible meals.

    Tellya, soon as I've learned to speak flooent Latvian, ima tacklin' basic soups with a view to total cuisine mastery.


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    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff togethah.

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    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by Princess Balestra View Post


      Shame these old classics ain't available as talkin' books.
      Actually there are apps that make all these books talkin'.

      Not sure if they're in Latvian though.
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  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
    I did the info angle, did the letterbox drop off
    for lawn care.

    Couldn't get them to pay.

    What did pay was running ads in newspaper classified ads
    in the lawn care section.

    .

    What worked even better was calling out those
    that had already used a lawn-care guy
    and hated their experience.

    Then put a penalty guarantee on me if those problems
    should ever occur again.
    to the tune of $1,000

    Just picking off a problem that nobody had the guts to fix in the marketplace.

    Best,
    Ewen
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    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

      I did the info angle, did the letterbox drop off
      for lawn care.

      Couldn't get them to pay.

      What did pay was running ads in newspaper classified ads
      in the lawn care section.

      .

      What worked even better was calling out those
      that had already used a lawn-care guy
      and hated their experience.

      Then put a penalty guarantee on me if those problems
      should ever occur again.
      to the tune of $1,000

      Just picking off a problem that nobody had the guts to fix in the marketplace.

      Best,
      Ewen
      Sounds like you tested things till they worked which is good.

      My lawn guy says he never advertises but can't keep up with the work because all of his business is from referrals.

      I like the guarantee thing you did.

      Reminds me of the ad I saw where a copywriter wrote an ad guaranteeing to outpull any ad you've ever ran by at least 10% or you don't owe anything. Was an ad Bencivenga wrote...

      https://swiped.co/file/ad-agency-gua...ry-bencivenga/

      or the other guy that will pay you $1500 if you think you wasted your time talking to him:

      https://swiped.co/file/consulting-sa...om-frank-kern/
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    • Profile picture of the author eccj
      Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

      I did the info angle, did the letterbox drop off
      for lawn care.

      Couldn't get them to pay.

      What did pay was running ads in newspaper classified ads
      in the lawn care section.

      .

      What worked even better was calling out those
      that had already used a lawn-care guy
      and hated their experience.

      Then put a penalty guarantee on me if those problems
      should ever occur again.
      to the tune of $1,000

      Just picking off a problem that nobody had the guts to fix in the marketplace.

      Best,
      Ewen
      That's a great story.

      I doubt the "teach them how to do it" angle would work well in the home services or home improvement industry. Doing so puts you in front of the wrong audience.

      The Do It For Me crowd doesn't want to know how to remodel the kitchen. They do want to know that their kitchen won't be a wreck for three months waiting on the contractor to get it finished.

      A New Kitchen In Days Not Months

      Type headline would work better, I think, than a
      How To Change Your Countertops
      Type headline.

      I think a lot of copywriters fail in local business because all the "best" copywriters are in the selling of info business and not the selling of things business.

      I read a book that a lot of people recommend that breaks down the best direct mail packages in history. I can't remember the name but it was by the guy who does the Who's Mailing What service.

      Anyways, every single example was for info marketing.

      I think a lot more copywriters could make a living if they learned how to write a winning ad for their local roofer vs learning how to write ads that only sell info.
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      • Profile picture of the author max5ty
        Originally Posted by eccj View Post

        That's a great story.

        I doubt the "teach them how to do it" angle would work well in the home services or home improvement industry. Doing so puts you in front of the wrong audience.

        The Do It For Me crowd doesn't want to know how to remodel the kitchen. They do want to know that their kitchen won't be a wreck for three months waiting on the contractor to get it finished.

        A New Kitchen In Days Not Months

        Type headline would work better, I think, than a
        How To Change Your Countertops
        Type headline.

        I think a lot of copywriters fail in local business because all the "best" copywriters are in the selling of info business and not the selling of things business.

        I read a book that a lot of people recommend that breaks down the best direct mail packages in history. I can't remember the name but it was by the guy who does the Who's Mailing What service.

        Anyways, every single example was for info marketing.

        I think a lot more copywriters could make a living if they learned how to write a winning ad for their local roofer vs learning how to write ads that only sell info.
        Thanks for your comment.

        I do disagree with a couple things though.

        Although I wouldn't advocate selling info -

        it's been proven time and again that giving away info can set you as an authority on a subject.

        A home remodeler telling you 10 ways to beautify your kitchen with insider tips and tricks wouldn't be giving most people the desire to do it (except the ones that were already going to). It lets the customer know you knew what you were talking about...so who would they call?

        It's just one of the many ideas a business can use - and it's been proven to work.
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        • Profile picture of the author eccj
          Originally Posted by max5ty View Post

          Thanks for your comment.

          I do disagree with a couple things though.

          Although I wouldn't advocate selling info -

          it's been proven time and again that giving away info can set you as an authority on a subject.

          A home remodeler telling you 10 ways to beautify your kitchen with insider tips and tricks wouldn't be giving most people the desire to do it (except the ones that were already going to). It lets the customer know you knew what you were talking about...so who would they call?

          It's just one of the many ideas a business can use - and it's been proven to work.
          Yes I agree that you want to set yourself up as an authority and info is a way to do it cheaply. Video would be another great way to do it.

          The key from a lead gen perspective is to give the right information that the ideal client is looking for. The ideal client isn't even thinking about doing it themselves but wants to some type of info to help make his decision.

          That hook is hard for one time large purchases. I guess that is why no one does it.

          I read recently that home owners looking to buy floors take four months on average from starting to look until they make a purchase. By the time most businesses get a marketing message in front of them they are months into the purchasing cycle and it is most likely too late to add value that justifies higher prices.
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          • Profile picture of the author DABK
            I can attest to many businesses being late to the game; many so late they might as well not have bothered.

            I find myself searching online, buying something, then getting marketing materials online and online about the thing I bought and will not need to buy again for months or years.

            I also get the opposite: marketing materials at the beginning of my search, with no follow-up.

            Originally Posted by eccj View Post

            Yes I agree that you want to set yourself up as an authority and info is a way to do it cheaply. Video would be another great way to do it.

            The key from a lead gen perspective is to give the right information that the ideal client is looking for. The ideal client isn't even thinking about doing it themselves but wants to some type of info to help make his decision.

            That hook is hard for one time large purchases. I guess that is why no one does it.

            I read recently that home owners looking to buy floors take four months on average from starting to look until they make a purchase. By the time most businesses get a marketing message in front of them they are months into the purchasing cycle and it is most likely too late to add value that justifies higher prices.
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          • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
            Originally Posted by eccj View Post

            .

            I read recently that home owners looking to buy floors take four months on average from starting to look until they make a purchase. By the time most businesses get a marketing message in front of them they are months into the purchasing cycle and it is most likely too late to add value that justifies higher prices.
            You still have a shot by using my
            resetting the buying criteria strategy.

            Like flooring, websites can take a lot of deliberation
            when buying design.

            Here's how it's structured so you challenge the choices a buyer makes
            without coming across as self-serving.

            https://www.warriorforum.com/offline...out-water.html.

            https://www.warriorforum.com/offline...5k-2-days.html
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  • Profile picture of the author rkahn
    Hey I appreciate the effort you must have gone through to put this summary together; let me tell that it offers some very useful information.
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  • The $1500 Ain't Gonna Waste Yer Time guarantee is powerful stuff, an' I seen this done for diffrent amounts.


    Combines the best elements of brassneck bravado with self-generatin' testimonial bcs you gotta have faith in yourself to hoist aloft such a pitch.


    Jus' gotta wonder how much easier it is to take up that kinda offer now we know gettin' refunds for ebooks we dooplicated is kinda easy.


    tbh the bencivenga is the more evergreen play in a world of vacuous hustler consoomers.
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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    @ Princess Balestra - was gonna post something the other day but I kept forgetting. Your comic book ad thingy made me remember something that might be of interest to others:

    Comic Book Ads
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  • That's a real cool link, Cap'n Way Useful Guy.


    This one figured on WF earliah in the millennium, but I postin' again bcs nuthin' beats powerin' up the value of a hot resource -- even when it is only Moi vacuumin' my apartment, dressed as Trashy Kimono Woman ...

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    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff togethah.

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  • Ha!

    Sum people say size don't mattah, but for sure I wanna get my hands on your swipes.

    For srs tho, expertly curated bookmarks an' intel are worth more than storage.

    Plus I love so how comic book ads are so shamelessly evocative.

    It's like they got bitten by a radioactive copywritah.

    But your last point is real downhome terra firma stuffs.

    Kinda how the evocative powah of the imagination juices up the engines.

    All ads an' copy play to the privileged access panorama hidden behind the eyeballs of evry potential buyer -- in precisely the same hideyhole where shame an' fear go to flourish like plagues on the Planet of Rats.

    Whether we appealin' to reason or yankin' emotion's triggerest levers, fyooture consequence got a big part to play in evry decision we make -- even if it it jus' WHICH SHAMPOO?

    Actschwlly, lemme rephrase that -- especially if it is WHICH SHAMPOO? bcs my hair is kinda rebellin' rn.

    Thing is, nowan ain't nevah directly touched on no fyootyure stuffs yet (I tried astral travelin' once as a preamble to precog prowess, but all I got was a sore ass an' 13 undelivered pizzas) -- which is why visionaries with plausibly deliverable utopian scripts win out, even if they jus' rockin' fake nooz on FB.

    Sumtimes, we react to illoosions like they were real, an' howevah accurate most predictions claim to be, they ain't nuthin' till time's unforgivin' accuracy says YOUR TURN NEXT, SWEETIE.

    So I guess any copy persons out there gotta be figurin' the accuratest illoosions they got.

    When you insertin' thought bubbles ovah people's heads, you gotta be sure they would say that stuff out loud -- if'n only they could.

    Mebbe the relationship between the past an' the fyooture is forevah the dynamic of established fact vs speculative fiction -- with the hooman nervous system as evolvin' intermediary.

    Meantime, for sure I would wanna fix up a Slack Belt in Dim Mak.

    Thinkin' diffrently 'bout tamara, Trapdoor Guy disappears all the psoodo-intooitive Apple trash -- an' the light of all glories shines resplendent ovah a liberated planet.

    Plus also -- it is only 40 more years to the 60s.

    An' I guess the only thing we trooly got in common with those 2060 guys -- an' Schwab -- is how nuthin' beyond NOW ain't evah happened yet.

    Call me a pessimist, but Total Frickin' Voids gotta be filled up with sumthin', if only to make oblivion more palatable.

    As an optimist, I would want always to mebbe sketch out sum kinda dream sounds like it gonna tread out all sweet & actschwl -- even if it is only purely imaginary in nature.
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  • Profile picture of the author amjadshuvo
    Your insightful written speech is both noteworthy & praiseworthy.
    The truth is that every human; you and I revolve around our own interests.

    But interest varies. All do not run after the same benefit. For what I am running can be meaningless and ridiculous to others. Likewise, In the field of yours, the result can be the same.

    After going through, what I have understood that All, not the most love to read the hearts' words, not of the brain. When you throw the words from heart, people would love to catch.

    In the whole world, readers want to eat those words mixed with emotion, passion, and the readers' cherished intension.

    It is important to know the hearts of readers and throw the words from the heart.
    What I have noticed, every successful copywriter does the same.

    The division of people's wanna is splendid, What you did in your speech.

    "People Want to GAIN, Want to BE, want to DO"

    That means every single word should be based on reader intention.
    Thanks for your detail description, I have gone through this minutely.
    I would love to feed more words like these to my heart.
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  • Profile picture of the author proteresa
    Banned
    Think your summary. Many many thanks.
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  • How 'bout we all settle on optimum orbit?

    Trad says: we all swirlin' round, kinda cyclic.

    Random says: anywan licked your moons real sweet recently? Till they disregarded gravitational pull on a Decibels Don't Mattah bcs I Screamin' ticket?

    So I would want always to straddle the touchpoint of the mutable inevitable with my fanciest evah area.

    Kinda fix up demand c/o the juiciest deliverables available to today's PLANET ABOUT TO BE SNUFFED FROM THE COSMOS scenario.

    An' this is neither to be senasationlist nor exploiterismic.

    If optimum orbits may be settled upon -- hey, why in hell not?

    What celestial forces evah rocked copy anyways other than myootyooly wannable smoochie?
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