Best books on telephone sales

44 replies
I got a call from a dude I used to work with back in the day (I'm 97, so this was a while ago) who is now going out on his own as a stockbroker starting from scratch.

He wants to know the best books on telephone sales where the salesperson does all the prospecting, selling and closing (i.e., not a TO system), and it is all done on the phone.

My sales books are geared toward corporate sales as that is my background. What books would you suggest to him for pure telephone cold calling, selling and closing?
#books #sales #telephone
  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    What kinda sorta is he selling?

    My sales book knowledge is petty much old school by many standards here. "Little read book of selling" and "how to master the art of selling" and "Mastering the Complex Sale" - I prefer the first edition over the 2nd. Zigs book "Secrets of closing the sale" Any and I more so think all of them give that foundation.

    what I have done over the years is used many of the techniques above and modernized the pre-qualification process in such a way that even before I communicate with the CM, I have a good idea if they are a fit or not.

    Why I ask what they are selling is.. I sell what I call digital services. Web based stuff. Web design, SEO, CRO. I can ascertain a bunch of that Pre stuff before the conversations ever begins. If they are talking to Doctors or something.. I think I would be lost.

    You simply cant spend some time online with some handy dandy tools and get a good idea of what they are doing. what the competition is doing. what other sectors of the market is doing. What non related markets are doing. its just not so much there in the "offline world"

    If I were going to go out and start selling Printing via cold calling next week. The books above would be the reads I would hit.


    Aside from reading.. getting organized is a big deal. I have been playing with HubSpots CRM lately kinda nice.. and FREE

    Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

    I got a call from a dude I used to work with back in the day (I'm 97, so this was a while ago) who is now going out on his own.

    He wants to know the best books on telephone sales where the salesperson does all the prospecting, selling and closing (i.e., not a TO system), and it is all done on the phone.

    My sales books are geared toward corporate sales as that is my background. What books would you suggest to him for pure telephone cold calling, selling and closing?
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    • Profile picture of the author unglued
      While it's not exclusively a phone sales book, the late Harry Browne's "The Secret of Selling Anything" is hands down the absolute best book on selling I've ever read. It does have a section devoted to selling by phone, but literally is universally applicable to ALL products, services, and sales situations.

      At only about 140 pages, it truly is the "cure for what ails ya" no matter what you sell. It so accurately dissects the properly executed sales process that you'll not only be able to sell successfully by the end of the book, but also understand why you missed every sale you ever botched in the past. It was a HUGE eye-opener for me, and everyone with a pulse should read it if they haven't already. It maps sales success directly onto all relationships and life in general, and utterly removed the mystery from sales and my past failures at it.

      It's not a technical magic wand, because you'll still need to adapt your new knowledge to your product or service and practice a bit, but it's the closest thing I've ever seen to one. You'll finally, clearly see the path to wherever you want sales to take you, whether seasoned pro or rank noob.

      Not to detract from any of the recommendations by savidge4 above, as I've only read one of them, but I cannot muster the superlatives to express how good, complete, and just plain correct Brown's book is. I can count on one hand the folks here that I even suspect might not glean something useful from it.

      Hope it helps,

      unglued
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  • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
    Forgot to mention he is a stockbroker. He always wanted to be one and is starting out with nothing. (I edited the first post with this info.)

    OK, here are some options:

    Sales Prospecting: The Ultimate Guide To Finding Highly Likely Prospects You Can Close In One Call/ Claude Whitacre/
    Now this book I can recommend to my friend as I have it and use it. Don't know much about the author.

    Cold Calling Techniques (That Really Work!)/ by Stephen Schiffman
    Classic that has a lot of good info but I think is geared to setting up office appointments.

    Phone Power/ George Walther

    Any others come to mind?
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  • Profile picture of the author DavidAllenNeron
    Persuasion Engineering by Richard Bandler.

    Amazing Sales Training and Attitude Installation.
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  • Profile picture of the author Huskerdarren
    I think Telesales Tips From The Trenches: Secrets of a Street-Smart Salesman
    by Joe Catal is an excellent book. He was mainly selling telephone answering machines to businesses, so that part is dated, but he had a lot of great tips on how to handle yourself on the phone.
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  • Profile picture of the author club20coaching
    I would like to say that you should also read the 10x rule which will empower you to push trough more calls to reach goals you never thought were possible. This book is written by an expert that makes $40,000 sales over the phone and he can teach you how to kick some serious booty on the phone!
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Best complete book on selling over the phone...from contact to contract, is
      The Ultimate Book of Phone Scripts by Mike Brooks.

      The best book on selling stocks over the phone is;
      Successful Telephone Selling in the '90s by Martin D. Shafiroff

      I've read about every book on selling ever written. These are the two best.

      For setting appointments?
      Cold Calling Techniques (That Really Work!) by Stephen Schiffman, the 2014 edition.

      These are just opinions.
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      • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
        Here's how I opened 333 accounts by cold calling in my first year as a stockbroker. I went to work for Dean Witter (extinct now) in 1985. They gave us a sales script that went something like this;

        Hello, Mr. Smith.

        If it wasn't you asked for Mr. Smith. If it was Mrs. Smith and she wanted to know what you wanted, you started right into the script.

        I'm John Doe with Dean Witter. You've heard of us haven't you? Wait for an answer.

        No.

        We are a Wall St brokerage firm with an office in Fairfield.

        She would then pass the phone or hang up.

        When he came on the line, you repeated the I'm John line.

        Then you asked if he invested. If yes, you then queried into how when and where.

        These gave you the ammo to move him from the other guy to you.

        If he said no, you immediately discussed the product du jour extolling all of its attributes and asked for an appointment.

        That was it.

        I realize some of the hot telemarketers here will squint and say you gotta be kidding me but I'm living proof it worked. My source of leads was the telephone book (also extinct). I would start with the A's and go through to the Z's. When I was done, I'd start again.

        Keep in mind I was new to telemarketing and didn't know anything but what they told me. They said it would work in the NY training session so I figured why not. Plus W. Clement Stone built an insurance empire by sending agents door to door to businesses only selling life insurance. At one time his was the largest insurance company in America. To me door to door is the same thing as cold calling on the phone sans the walking.

        So, knowing that I said to myself what have you got to lose and just did it.

        I realize that isn't a book but a script and scripts are a dime a dozen but that's one that worked. Look at it and see what it tells the person you called. I'd bet it could be called a book if you wanted to.

        Oh yeah, the 333 clients referred their friends, family and neighbors. All that for spending a few hours each day on the phone with what sounds like a hokey script.

        Best of luck to your friend.
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        • Profile picture of the author unglued
          Alright, I'll fess up. The suspense is killin' me. I just gotta know. Claude, have you read Browne's book, and if so, what did you think of it ? Did it even teach you ANYTHING ?
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by unglued View Post

            Alright, I'll fess up. The suspense is killin' me. I just gotta know. Claude, have you read Browne's book, and if so, what did you think of it ? Did it even teach you ANYTHING ?
            Browne is an investment author. I hadn't read the book. But I read the description on the Amazon sales page, and bought the book. Based on the description and reviews, it looks promising.

            I'll read it this afternoon, and let you know what I think tomorrow.

            And I'm honored that you think my opinion would matter.

            What I have noticed is that people that sell at the top of their industry, tend to work the same way. The 'positive thinking, affirmations, Always Be Closing, Every No gets you closer to a Yes, Selling is a numbers game, Rah Rah...." is mostly to get beginners motivated, because they don't know what they are doing.

            Talking to a master salesperson? It just sounds like a conversation. And to another great salesman? It sounds like Beethoven...Poetry....
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            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              I just got done reading The Secret Of Selling Anything by Harry Browne.

              The book is a cobbling together of two unpublished books he wrote; Secrets Of Success, in 1966....and Selling Is Easy, in 1969. So, it's really two unpublished short books, written 50 years ago. And it's the only thing I've seen for Browne related to selling (there may be more, but I've never seen it.)

              The first book, Secrets Of Success, is a basic "You can get whatever you want, if you help others get what they want" book. I wouldn't be surprised if Zig Ziglar gort his saying, "You can get anything you want in life, if you help enough other people get what they want", from Browne. I don't know which came first. So, the first book is a basic, single premise book on how people get wealthy by selling. Certainly worth reading, and some real wisdom.

              The second unpublished book, Selling Is Easy, astounded me. I skimmed through it, and then gave it a second, closer look.

              I hope this comes out right. The book brought tears to my eyes. I mean it.

              Here is an unpublished work, written in 1969 (I was 14 then)....that has the framework of a masterful sales book. In 1969, there were no books like this. Nobody was teaching salespeople like this. Browne showed a deep understanding of Human Engineering, that only a few today posses.

              I wish I had read this in 1973. Heck, I wish I had read it in 1999. The book is short, and light on technique. But what it has is gold. Listening to prospects? finding out what motivates them? giving them what they want? I'm not joking, these are advanced concepts even now. And Harry had them in 1969.

              Did I learn anything new? Just one little thing, start a committing question with "Then..."
              ...the book explains how, I'm not going to do all the work here. This is a book on selling, the same way Think And Grow Rich is a book about success. Light on technique, but stuffed with fundamental truths. There were many passages in the book that read like something I would write. I know how that sounds, but it's true.

              I see little parts of other great sales masterpieces, like SPIN Selling and High Probability Selling. But this book was written earlier than those.

              Now, why did the book bring me to tears a few times? I know what I had to go through to learn what I know about selling. And here I am, reading a book by someone else that thinks like me....that has arrived at the same conclusions, taken the same journey.

              My God! I just looked up his name, to see what he died of in 2006. This is the same Harry Browne that ran for president with the Libertarian Party. I had no idea they were the same man. I probably won't read his investment books, too old (the books and me). But he wrote this at 36 years old. Such insights from such a young man. Impressive. I know I couldn't have written this at 36.

              My personal Sales Hero has always been Ben Feldman. And he still is. But I think...Ben is no longer alone.

              Buy the damn book, and read it. Please.

              He died in 2006. He is a man I would have liked to meet. And through this book, I feel I have.
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              • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
                Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                I just got done reading The Secret Of Selling Anything by Harry Browne

                Buy the damn book, and read it. Please.

                He died in 2006. He is a man I would have liked to meet. And through this book, I feel I have.
                Darn Claude, I'm going have to re-read it again.

                Read it a few years ago however have forgotten
                most of what was written other than giving people
                what they want.

                Thanks,
                Doctor E. Vile
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                • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
                  The first page I just flipped through to,
                  boils down to the same thought process
                  I had when calling on prospects for my
                  point of sale paper business.

                  It was on the page where he talks about a book-keeping service example.

                  I don't know if Harry Browne had stuck in my mind,
                  but the thought process was we have saved other companies
                  money, we may be able to for them, but I don't know,
                  so let's talk to see if we can.

                  This is was got Puma and N.Z's leading
                  beer brewer charity
                  hair salon chain
                  building and hardware chain
                  cafe chain
                  mobile coffee chain
                  gold buyer chain
                  adult store chain
                  dental chain
                  fruit smoothie chain
                  fruit and vege chain
                  t shirt chain

                  plus lot's of single stores.

                  It's a refresher for me as what has worked and why.

                  Thanks Claude.

                  Best,
                  Doctor E. Vile
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                • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                  Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

                  Darn Claude, I'm going have to re-read it again.

                  Read it a few years ago however have forgotten
                  most of what was written other than giving people
                  what they want.

                  Thanks,
                  Doctor E. Vile
                  I should mention that if you read the book, you will not know how to sell. In the same way, reading Think And Grow Rich won't teach you how to make a fortune. You get the attitude needed, the point of view that will make you the most money. But this is not a book on technique. It is not a book on telephone selling. You will need much more.
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              • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
                Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                I wish I had read this in 1973. Heck, I wish I had read it in 1999.
                Did I learn anything new? Just one little thing, start a committing question with "Then..."
                This is the wonder and enlightenment when you've held great material in your hands and read it many times but for whatever reason thought "You Know it"....

                There is so much gold out there be it books written by deceased masters of their craft or living legends....like Claude et al....

                It's a refresher for me as what has worked and why.
                Best,
                Doctor E. Vile
                I think the issue with most great works that could help business owners is that they are seeking the "Holy Grail" or looking for the "Next Revelation"...

                when in so many cases there is such VALUABLE content out there if one is just to stop and digest often what they have on their shelf.

                BIG LESSON....

                You probably have enough information to truly succeed if you would only really take in fully what the people who have trod the hard road try to share with you.

                This the wisdom that everyone says you will gain with age...

                ....yet many ignore the wisdom put on plate before them because they think....

                ..."That's Old"

                ..."It doesn't Work Now"

                ...."Ah...I can work it out myself"

                recognise the big mistake we are all guilty of...

                discounting the acquired knowledge of real salesmanship.

                This is why there are numerous copycat publications often with nothing new and why you need to pay attention to some of what the "Old Geezers" (no - offence) share most openly on this forum.

                Take notes....
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                • Profile picture of the author dnamovich
                  Another Classic is by Frank Bettger "How I raised myself from failure to success in selling"
                  This book is timeless.
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                  • Profile picture of the author Freebiequeen1999
                    You can jump into a telemarketing room with no experience, no resume....most are looking for warm bodies to smile and dial..

                    and when there you can learn, especially in a decent room- learn from the closers

                    find the people with the most sales/appointments whatever and sit by them, listen to them and try what they are doing. Try different approaches.

                    All the while you will make some money and keep learning

                    You could go to an appointment setting room, a "customer service, soft sell room"....a hard sell room....and you would learn different things each time

                    Now....I am not saying you should do this instead of following your "dream" but the fact is many phone room jobs are essentially part time and at odd times - and many pay decently if you are "good"...and while you become "good" you will learn invaluable information

                    How to make your voice "friendly"....how to get past gatekeepers ...how to turn a call around....how to "mirror" the person on the other end of the phone...getting a "connection" with them in minutes....a "confidential whisper"......soft close, takeaway close.....bottom line close, urgent close, call in another closer, get the boss...hold on..... ..."feel felt found"...and much more.

                    Best of all you will lose the "fear" of cold calling...I personally don't even think of it as cold calling I think of it as me finding people who need and want my services. I have no sense of "bothering" them ...if they don't like what I have to say, their loss not mine LOL

                    You know you are a good telemarketer when nothing they say or do affects you at all....and you don't talk about it. Newbies do tend to go on and on about "oh what she said"..."he called me names"....and so forth.....spend 6 months in phone rooms and nothing will surprise you or stop you ..."Nexxxxxt"
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                    • Profile picture of the author digichik
                      Originally Posted by Freebiequeen1999 View Post

                      You can jump into a telemarketing room with no experience, no resume....most are looking for warm bodies to smile and dial..

                      and when there you can learn, especially in a decent room- learn from the closers

                      find the people with the most sales/appointments whatever and sit by them, listen to them and try what they are doing. Try different approaches.

                      All the while you will make some money and keep learning

                      You could go to an appointment setting room, a "customer service, soft sell room"....a hard sell room....and you would learn different things each time

                      Now....I am not saying you should do this instead of following your "dream" but the fact is many phone room jobs are essentially part time and at odd times - and many pay decently if you are "good"...and while you become "good" you will learn invaluable information

                      How to make your voice "friendly"....how to get past gatekeepers ...how to turn a call around....how to "mirror" the person on the other end of the phone...getting a "connection" with them in minutes....a "confidential whisper"......soft close, takeaway close.....bottom line close, urgent close, call in another closer, get the boss...hold on..... ..."feel felt found"...and much more.

                      Best of all you will lose the "fear" of cold calling...I personally don't even think of it as cold calling I think of it as me finding people who need and want my services. I have no sense of "bothering" them ...if they don't like what I have to say, their loss not mine LOL

                      You know you are a good telemarketer when nothing they say or do affects you at all....and you don't talk about it. Newbies do tend to go on and on about "oh what she said"..."he called me names"....and so forth.....spend 6 months in phone rooms and nothing will surprise you or stop you ..."Nexxxxxt"
                      This is sooo true.
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            • Profile picture of the author Freebiequeen1999
              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

              Browne is an investment author. I hadn't read the book. But I read the description on the Amazon sales page, and bought the book. Based on the description and reviews, it looks promising.

              I'll read it this afternoon, and let you know what I think tomorrow.

              And I'm honored that you think my opinion would matter.

              What I have noticed is that people that sell at the top of their industry, tend to work the same way. The 'positive thinking, affirmations, Always Be Closing, Every No gets you closer to a Yes, Selling is a numbers game, Rah Rah...." is mostly to get beginners motivated, because they don't know what they are doing.

              Talking to a master salesperson? It just sounds like a conversation. And to another great salesman? It sounds like Beethoven...Poetry....
              While I do feel you have to keep the "every no brings you closer to a yes" feeling up, I love the part about "conversation".....that is what it should be , not salesy (well mostly not, there are some buyers who actually respond to that but they are pretty rare)

              An important part of it is LISTENING....NOT JUST TALKING>..you have to listen to what they say.....I look for the "key"....the little piece of info that lets me turn the key and close
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              • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                Originally Posted by Freebiequeen1999 View Post

                An important part of it is LISTENING....NOT JUST TALKING>..you have to listen to what they say.....I look for the "key"....the little piece of info that lets me turn the key and close
                It's not just listening, to hear what they have to say. It's the act of listening..how they respond to it. Listening intently is a huge compliment. It says "We are equals. I value what you have to say. I want to help you". Listening implies that you are customizing your solution to them. Listening also implies that you are an expert. Who listens? Doctors, Lawyers, Psychiatrists, Friends.....people you trust. All of that is working in the mind, on an unconscious level.

                The other half of listening is asking questions. And asking questions is another form of compliment. It means you value what they say. They matter to you. It also means that your advice will be based on what they tell you, and that they should follow your recommendation. Who asks lots of questions? Again, Doctors, Lawyers, Professionals, Advice givers. And again, all this is churning in their mind.
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                • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
                  Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                  Who asks lots of questions? Again, Doctors, Lawyers, Professionals, Advice givers. And again, all this is churning in their mind.
                  Funny thing is I've had telemarketers tell me of their worries after I've told them "I'm at home looking after the kids"....my wife is away...and do they have kids?

                  They get so distracted..and easily distracted....maybe it is the pattern interrupt I just pushed back at them....

                  Often they will chat for a few minutes and forget their purpose.

                  Different when I'm in the office however...

                  I must remember to try a few things and see how they react.

                  Every "quality" call is a great education.
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            • Profile picture of the author socialentry
              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

              Talking to a master salesperson? It just sounds like a conversation. And to another great salesman? It sounds like Beethoven...Poetry....
              What do you mean by this exactly? Is it simply a way to say "This is so cool"? Or do you mean there is a real parallel with art?

              I was classically trained on the piano for the better part of a decade. I had ample thoughts alongside these lines without finding a conclusive answer, so it would be great to hear yours.

              and why Beethoven in particular?
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              • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

                What do you mean by this exactly? Is it simply a way to say "This is so cool"? Or do you mean there is a real parallel with art?

                I was classically trained on the piano for the better part of a decade. I had ample thoughts alongside these lines without finding a conclusive answer, so it would be great to hear yours.

                and why Beethoven in particular?
                I used Beethoven as an analogy. I listen to the music, but I don't have an educated ear for it.

                There is a real parallel with art. Understanding the complexity of the selling, as the complexity of a great painting, or great music. A great salesperson may be doing hundreds of things at one time, to propel the sale forward. Nearly all are unconscious, but they had to be learned.
                As an experiment once, I wrote down everything I was doing when I threw a punch (This is years ago, when I practiced Kung Fu). I stopped at 300 separate actions I was taking at exactly the same time. My guess was that I was doing 1,000 distinct things at one time.

                The same with great art and great selling. The action becomes nuanced. And almost nobody can see it. So when I see a master salesperson at work, I like to watch. It really is like classical music to me....like I can hear all the instruments.

                The three greatest salespeople I even met were selling men's suits (to me), a house full of furniture (when we just went in for an end table), and a waiter.The waiter was doing less, than the other two. But what he was doing was a novelty to me, and highly instructive. The other two salesmen were just outstanding. The suit salesman didn't want to talk about it as technique...because i was buying. But the furniture salesman (I asked for him by reputation) spent quite a lot of time, after we bought, explaining what we went through...as technique.

                In a large furniture store, in the middle of a recession, with 9 other salespeople milling about....this man was busy.When we got there, he was with a customer. We had to wait. He took us from an end table to over $25,000 in high end furniture. I knew what he was doing. I laughed out loud several times. But I didn't mind a bit. The furniture was high grade, and he was giving us what we wanted......everything we wanted....and everything we would ever want..

                My poor wife had to stand there while two salesmen discussed technique. And then she had to wait for 15 minutes in the car, while I took notes.

                Two weeks later, I got home, and our Sunroom had an additional $5,000 in furniture. I asked my wife where it came from. She said "Steve called from the furniture store. He had some new pieces in, he thought I should take a look at. So I thought I would surprise you".

                Dealing with a master Salesman, is like getting a massage. It feels great while your there, and it feels great afterward.
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        • Profile picture of the author John Durham
          Originally Posted by sandalwood View Post


          Keep in mind I was new to telemarketing and didn't know anything but what they told me. .

          Sometimes that's the best way to start. I was selling 3 online directory listings per day before I even had a computer at home, or an email account. I didn't even know what yahoo was. I was just reading the script like they told me to and dialing the numbers.

          A proven script or selling process is just that, it's success can be duplicated by just repeating it in the prescribed manner.

          Period.

          I love your story here!


          Ps. "The Greatest Salesman In The World" by Og Mandino was the most empowering book for me!
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      • Profile picture of the author Michael Nguyen
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Best complete book on selling over the phone...from contact to contract, is
        The Ultimate Book of Phone Scripts by Mike Brooks.

        The best book on selling stocks over the phone is;
        Successful Telephone Selling in the '90s by Martin D. Shafiroff

        I've read about every book on selling ever written. These are the two best.

        For setting appointments?
        Cold Calling Techniques (That Really Work!) by Stephen Schiffman, the 2014 edition.

        These are just opinions.
        I'd like to chime in here and agree with Claude, "The Ultimate Book of Phone Scripts" is one killer book and has made my telephone sales much better. If you want to go one step better, then you need to study Stan Billue (Mike Brooks mentor). BTW Stan Billue is dying of cancer and he only has a short amount of time left. Search him out. I feel privilege to have spoke to him on the phone
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  • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
    Thanks, kids. By the way, speaking of Harry Browne, Gary Bencivenga, widely regarded as the best copywriter living today, gives high praise to "The Secret of Selling Anything."

    Marketing Bullets | Bullet #29

    http://www.warriorforum.com/copywrit...-thinks-s.html

    As does Ryan McGrath here:

    The Greatest Little Book on Salesmanship Ever Published*|*Ryan McGrath

    Here is a non-affil Amazon link:
    Amazon.com: The Secret of Selling Anything eBook:...Amazon.com: The Secret of Selling Anything eBook:...
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    Marketing is not a battle of products. It is a battle of perceptions.
    - Jack Trout
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  • Profile picture of the author Freebiequeen1999
    One thing I have found is that....buyers....buy

    This has proved true for me in anything I ever sold, by phone, in person, online, appointment setting whatever.

    Buyers....buy

    Happy Buyer....great...so glad that is working for you, and I just know this (whatever) will only enhance it

    An "unhappy" buyer
    can be one of the easiest sales if you can gain their trust
    Mortgage rate was higher than you thought, ad didn't pull sales, webmaster left you stranded, whatever....." that won''t happen here, LET'S FIX IT...LET'S SOLVE IT...WE CAN DO THIS"



    Buyers Buy.

    The hardest (for me) to overcome - and I won't waste too much time - are those who make/made choices based on emotions/belief/loyalty...

    example "My nephew would be so hurt if I changed the website he designed"
    "Your (whatever) sounds perfect but I deal with people from my chuch and I just can't change"

    Actually I often find the "disgruntled" ones to be the easiest....listen to them....empathize with them...
    and then "team" up with them...."Ouch Sue...well WE ARE NOT GOING TO LET THAT HAPPEN AGAIN...my company stands behind our spa equipment"

    "Oh wow, what you have been through, you deserve a break here Joe....LET'S SET YOU UP WITH AN AD PACKAGE AND CUSTOM GRAPHICS that will get results and is affordable and we are going to work together so you can approve it step by step."

    and so forth. Listening to them complain puts you on their "side"....you are now on "their team"...and together you move that team into the sale ...
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Freebiequeen1999 View Post

      One thing I have found is that....buyers....buy

      This has proved true for me in anything I ever sold, by phone, in person, online, appointment setting whatever.

      Buyers....buy

      An "unhappy" buyer
      can be one of the easiest sales if you can gain their trust
      Mortgage rate was higher than you thought, ad didn't pull sales, webmaster left you stranded, whatever....." that won''t happen here, LET'S FIX IT...LET'S SOLVE IT...WE CAN DO THIS"

      Happy Buyer....great...so glad that is working for you, and I just know this (whatever) will only enhance it

      Buyers Buy.

      The hardest (for me) to overcome - and I won't waste too much time - are those who make/made choices based on emotions/belief/loyalty...

      example "My nephew would be so hurt if I changed the website he designed"
      "Your (whatever) sounds perfect but I deal with people from my chuch and I just can't change"

      Actually I often find the "disgruntled" ones to be the easiest....listen to them....empathize with them...
      and then "team" up with them...."Ouch Sue...well WE ARE NOT GOING TO LET THAT HAPPEN AGAIN...my company stands behind our spa equipment"

      "Oh wow, what you have been through, you deserve a break here Joe....LET'S SET YOU UP WITH AN AD PACKAGE AND CUSTOM GRAPHICS that will get results and is affordable and we are going to work together so you can approve it step by step."

      and so forth. Listening to them complain puts you on their "side"....you are now on "their team"...and together you move that team into the sale ...

      Yup. I would much rather deal with an angry person, than a disinterested one.

      There is no momentum with a disinterested person. But an angry person is emotionally involved. Some of the easiest sales I ever made were listening to an angry customer (mine, or someone else's), vent..until they were exhausted. And then we would join forces against the evil of the offending company. (Even if it was my company)

      Anger is a lot closer to love, than disinterest is.
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      • Profile picture of the author socialentry
        @Claude

        To push the analogy further, do you think that sales can make another person feel the same depth of emotion as great art in the prospect (not necessarily someone like you who can see all the strings)?
        Did you ever learn anything in art that you could apply to sales or am I taking the analogy a bit too far?

        Also:what did the waiter sell to you? A waiter seems to be an odd choice for your top 3 salesman.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

          @Claude

          To push the analogy further, do you think that sales can make another person feel the same depth of emotion as great art in the prospect (not necessarily someone like you who can see all the strings)? .
          Maybe. It's a little out of my experience. The greatest salespeople aren't thought of as great by the customers. The customers think they decided to buy, all on their own. It's really a hidden art.




          Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

          Did you ever learn anything in art that you could apply to sales or am I taking the analogy a bit too far? .
          In art? No. In martial arts? A little. Principles are the same in any endeavor. At least that's my experience. For example, the three biggest breakthroughs I made in my martial art training is when I watched a man at a fair, use a sledgehammer to ring the bell. Also,watching an alligator roll with prey in it's mouth, and watching an electric knife easily cut through steak. I took the principles involved, translated them into my practice, and made unusually advanced progress. In selling, some of the biggest breakthroughs I made were in watching someone outside of sales, use an efficient shortcut...and decided to try to fit that principle into my selling. It didn't always work, but sometimes it made a huge difference.

          This sounds more amazing than it is. This took place over a few decades..not in 3 months.

          Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

          Also:what did the waiter sell to you? A waiter seems to be an odd choice for your top 3 salesman.
          The waiter taught me the power of recommending someone not buy something you were selling. You instantly become the expert, their guide. I've talked about this before. I'll try to find a post I made, and add it here.

          --------
          Here you go, from my blog.

          Selling - Could The World's Greatest Salesman Be A Waiter?

          Years ago, My wife, in-laws, and I went into an expensive restaurant. The waiter asked us for our order. I don't remember what we ordered, but I do remember this: The waiter gave a funny look & said " The Cod isn't very fresh today, may I recommend the Scrod?" or words to that effect.

          As he went around the table, he either complimented us on our choice or made a small suggestion on our selection. We were listening to his every word. Watching this" artist" at work was interesting enough to keep me from talking much. I knew the Cod was fresh. Other people were eating it. But this was what our waiter did: 1) He recommended a dish slightly" less" expensive than the one ordered. This proved to the group that he was looking out for our best interests. This also let him" take control" of our groups buying decisions. 2) The next recommendations, & the recommendations for wine & dessert were" not" less expensive. 3) Because he had " Taken Care" of us, the group felt an obligation to leave a" big" tip. 4)Whenever my brother-in-law (the perceived head of the table) ordered, the waiter complimented him on his excellent choice. 5) The waiter gave us a couple small samples of dessert to try for" free.

          There are so many marketing lessons here, I honestly don't know where to begin, but here goes... Make the switch from " Product Pusher" to " Trusted Advisor" . Our waiter seemed more interested in taking care of us than making a profit. I said " seemed" .

          Once the rapport had been established, the customer will be much more inclined to try to maintain that rapport. (by following your suggestions) The Free dessert samples (at" no" cost to the waiter, & minimal cost to the owner)" cemented" the idea that this guy was our friend. He kept talking about us & our needs. And kept offering suggestions, sandwiched between compliments. We were" sold.

          While there was mindless chatter at our table about the weather & who just had a baby, I watched as my new teacher went from table to table repeating the same technique. " the first choice is not fresh, may I recommend this?" & so on. My wife & I never went back to that restaurant. This would be a better story if we did, I know. So I don't know what happened to our waiter friend. But I do know what happened to me. I went home & wrote down what happened, because I knew I would forget.

          ---------------------------------------------------------

          What I got from that experience was really the power of saying "No" to a prospect. I always use the idea at least once in every presentation. Telling a prospect "No", instantly gives you enormous power. And then saying, after you have established that you are a trusted authority, "May I recommend....?". Most of the time, they just say "OK".

          i also learned to recommend whatever I though they were thinking anyway. I was literally "Pre-agreeing" with them.

          For example, they may be asking about the down payment. Now, to them, it's just a question. But I want to get in front of what they are thinking, so my recommendation perfectly aligns with what they were thinking. So I may say, "May I make a recommendation? Most of our customers actually make very small down payments, and then they have the freedom to pay this off whenever it makes sense to them. How does that sound?"

          It's what they were thinking anyway. And to them, we are just agreeing, and have strong rapport. I learned this from two sources; Learning how you can tail a car by driving in front of them, and by watching talented cold readers (Cold reading is how psychics sound like they are saying things they wouldn't possibly know. Really you already told them).


          So I took the "following, by driving in front of them", and decided to try to use that in selling. I already knew about the psychic cold reading. Same principle, different application.
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          • Profile picture of the author socialentry
            [DELETED]
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  • Profile picture of the author daniyal100
    you don't need books or any training. these are just excuses not to do it now but later which ofcourse never comes
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    • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
      Originally Posted by daniyal100 View Post

      you don't need books or any training. these are just excuses not to do it now but later which ofcourse never comes
      I agree. I was just talking with my doctor about this. He uses your approach and has been very successful. He never went to med school, never read a book, never attempts to stay up to date with new techniques, and never shares knowledge in medical forums or journals.

      He just takes out a cook's knife from the butcher block in his kitchen and starts taking out body parts. He says this approach frees up a ton of time for trout fishing and cheering on the Cowboys.
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      - Jack Trout
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

        I agree. I was just talking with my doctor about this. He uses your approach and has been very successful. He never went to med school, never read a book, never attempts to stay up to date with new techniques, and never shares knowledge in medical forums or journals.

        He just takes out a cook's knife from the butcher block in his kitchen and starts taking out body parts. He says this approach frees up a ton of time for trout fishing and cheering on the Cowboys.
        I replied to his post in much the same way. But I deleted mine, because I was meaner than you.

        But a sarcastic,"I wish I could forget everything I learned from books, over the decades....and everything I learned from others...already successful in selling. Imagine how much easier my life would be"....would about sum it up.

        Oh, and the "not reading books or getting training" idea is a real method. I call it The Beginner Method. Because that's how beginners think.
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        • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          Oh, and the "not reading books or getting training" idea is a teal method. I call it The Beginner Method. Because that's how beginners think.
          Hmmmm ... that makes me wonder what you think about me - as you know
          my personal history of not reading sales stuff.

          btw: I not saying that in any mean spirited way - I know for every
          rule there is an anomaly ... I'm just kinda making a point - while
          taking a good nature d jab

          p.s
          Quantum physics ... giggity
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

            Hmmmm ... that makes me wonder what you think about me - as you know
            my personal history of not reading sales stuff.

            btw: I not saying that in any mean spirited way - I know for every
            rule there is an anomaly ... I'm just kinda making a point - while
            taking a good nature d jab

            p.s
            Quantum physics ... giggity
            You aren't an anomaly. You know the value of training. It doesn't have to come from books. And, I don't like the idea of training....without working. They should go hand in hand. If you just spend weeks training, you have nothing to attach the ideas to. You need to actually work, to see how your new ideas actually work. They don't become skills unless you combine the real work, with the training.

            Man, I sound like a grouchy old man. I wonder why?
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            • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

              You aren't an anomaly. You know the value of training. It doesn't have to come from books. And, I don't like the idea of training....without working. They should go hand in hand. If you just spend weeks training, you have nothing to attach the ideas to. You need to actually work, to see how your new ideas actually work. They don't become skills unless you combine the real work, with the training.

              Man, I sound like a grouchy old man. I wonder why?
              Wrong side of the bed? Haven't had your daily dose of chicken yet?
              I haven't been around very much - How are things going for you.

              I miss what this place was
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              • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

                Wrong side of the bed? Haven't had your daily dose of chicken yet?
                I haven't been around very much - How are things going for you.

                I miss what this place was
                Close to retirement. Still have the store. Still speak occasionally. I even have a new book and sales program coming out in the next month or two. But then I think that's it for me. Webinars to sell the program....a few more speeches....and then just writing,and goofing off.

                There are still some great ones here. I just read a thread where Ewen Vile took a member to school, and there are some interesting exchanges.

                I miss the marathon deep thinking exchanges between you, me and a few of the real sharp ones.
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                • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
                  Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                  Close to retirement.
                  Good luck with that, I retired once for close to 10 years.
                  The first few years was fun - then it became boring ...
                  unbearably boring.

                  I wont ever retire again - my bizz might shift, but I wont close
                  up shop until I am dead.
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                  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
                    Claude, I don't know if you or the other readers how powerful
                    this bit what you said earlier...

                    ""May I make a recommendation? Most of our customers actually make very small down payments, and then they have the freedom to pay this off whenever it makes sense to them. How does that sound?"

                    I personally used a less sophisticated version of that
                    in my previous lawnmowing business, which went sometime like this...

                    " Mrs Smith, for your size lawn, my other clients are paying me $50 for it.
                    Would this work for you?"

                    This would be done after all the discussion about her problems
                    with the last guy and what she really wants.
                    I would innocently enquire what she had to pay
                    for that bad experience and would winningly tell me.

                    That would have me set a price higher so she doesn't
                    get that pain again.

                    Anyway, setting the expection of future behavior can be
                    used in so many ways by saying that's what your customers
                    do, therefore normal behavior.

                    My consulting client set this up for his dad to fix the proble
                    of prospects not getting back to them after a high ticket quote
                    was given.

                    Now they will call even if they had gone with somebody else,
                    which as we know, a no is much better than being left in limbo.

                    So I can see the application of setting up future behavior can
                    be to set higher prices, bigger up front payments, shorten the sales cycle,
                    end being squeezed on price are a few off the top of my head.

                    Then of course, just how far you push these out to the limit
                    would bs a fun exercise.

                    Best
                    Doctor E. Vile
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      • Profile picture of the author daniyal100
        Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

        I agree. I was just talking with my doctor about this. He uses your approach and has been very successful. He never went to med school, never read a book, never attempts to stay up to date with new techniques, and never shares knowledge in medical forums or journals.

        He just takes out a cook's knife from the butcher block in his kitchen and starts taking out body parts. He says this approach frees up a ton of time for trout fishing and cheering on the Cowboys.
        Mohammed Ali the greatest of all time and the most noticeable sports person of the century was not even a professional boxer "technically"

        The doc example does not fit here man and you know that too even if you have a below average mind.

        The reason you saying this is because your here to get reputation so you use it..Now dont ask me how. lol
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        • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
          Originally Posted by daniyal100 View Post

          Mohammed Ali the greatest of all time and the most noticeable sports person of the century was not even a professional boxer "technically"

          The doc example does not fit here man and you know that too even if you have a below average mind.

          The reason you saying this is because your here to get reputation so you use it..Now dont ask me how. lol
          I honestly don't know what you are talking about, but here is a funny video of Ali battling a kid.


          Signature
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          - Jack Trout
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          • Profile picture of the author daniyal100
            Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

            I honestly don't know what you are talking about, but here is a funny video of Ali battling a kid.


            Muhammad Ali Boxing Kid - Funniest Ali Ever - YouTube
            May God bless you joe. That's all i can say after seeing your reply. Everybody reading this will get it what you trying to do.
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            • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
              Originally Posted by daniyal100 View Post

              May God bless you joe. That's all i can say after seeing your reply. Everybody reading this will get it what you trying to do.
              I still don't know what you are on about, so let's back up a few squares. My beef with your original post is you don't believe in books or training. Here is your post: "you don't need books or any training. these are just excuses not to do it now but later which ofcourse never comes."

              I believe it is the exact opposite. Everyone needs to keep training, reading, studying and raising their game. That includes CEOs, Presidents, leaders, influencers, everybody.

              Even supermodels. When Tyra Banks was accepted into the Harvard Professional Business School program, what did she do? She hired a team of educators to make sure she was prepared.

              High achievers read and study because they have to. Their jobs, responsibilities and goals require them to stay on top of a fast-moving world.

              My guess is you've been burned by someone selling a rehashed, chintzy IM product. Fair enough. Those people are out there. But it doesn't take long to spot those guys a mile away, and focus on top notch teachers, not just in IM but in all educational pursuits.

              The reason this is important is because some here want a push-button solution. They don't exist. But with good training and hard work employing sound methods, success is very achievable. When you say training and books are not needed, I have to disagree.
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              - Jack Trout
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by daniyal100 View Post

          The doc example does not fit here man and you know that too even if you have a below average mind.

          The reason you saying this is because your here to get reputation so you use it..Now dont ask me how. lol
          Actually, Joe does have a reputation here, already. He contributes and is a smart marketer. He knows quite a lot about selling, and shares what he knows.

          Maybe sales isn't for you.
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