E-commerce - URLs structure

by Flop
17 replies
  • SEO
  • |
Often I notice e-commerce URLs being very different from the category page to the product page.

For example:
www.example.com/men-clothes/ for the category page
once you click on the product page it becomes: www.example.com/fitted-shirts-black.com

According to your experience, wouldn't it be more beneficial to structure the URL as such:
http://www.example.com/men-clothes/f...irts-black.com ?

Cheers
#ecommerce #structure #urls
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  • Profile picture of the author mason4
    ehhh, I don't understand why it finishes with .com, maybe you made a mistake? It's .html, right? Or if not, so why?
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  • Profile picture of the author Flop
    Hey Mason - Sorry my bad, I meant:

    www.example.com/men-clothes/ for the category page
    once you click on the product page it becomes: www.example.com/fitted-shirts-black.html

    According to your experience, wouldn't it be more beneficial to structure the URL as such:
    http://www.example.com/men-clothes/f...rts-black.html ?
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  • Profile picture of the author RuskinF
    The first way is easier and simpler to maintain because the product can become out of stock or can be discontinued at some point in time. In such a case the URL can just be dumped all together.
    Also, there are fewer subsections in the URL slug if they keep the directory and the listed product on a separate URL.
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  • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
    From an SEO perspective, it's not really going to matter all that much. If you have the option, I'd rather go without the category folder in the URL because the product page stays autonomous and won't have a bunch of different duplicate reference path URLs (from other categories, sorting, etc.).
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    My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox News, the NY Times & Flippa
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  • Profile picture of the author amb1guous
    Yes, it would give more of an SEO advantage. When you use platforms like Shopify or WordPress, some URLs get discombobulated with however way the system prefers, so if you can organize it better (as well as remove duplicate pages in the background), it's more power to your website searchability and ranking.
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  • Profile picture of the author Flop
    Thanks!
    I also believe having a clear URL path would give an SEO advantage (not changing the URL structure from the category page to the product)
    If I use descriptive product names, I probably will have two times the same keywords in the URL, which might be considered as spammy by Google, what do you think?
    E.g:
    www.example.com/short-sleeve-shirts for the category page
    http://www.example.com/short-sleeve-...s-blue-striped for the product page
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    • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
      Originally Posted by Flop View Post

      Thanks!
      I also believe having a clear URL path would give an SEO advantage (not changing the URL structure from the category page to the product)
      If I use descriptive product names, I probably will have two times the same keywords in the URL, which might be considered as spammy by Google, what do you think?
      E.g:
      www.example.com/short-sleeve-shirts for the category page
      http://www.example.com/short-sleeve-...s-blue-striped for the product page
      Nothing at all wrong with that and the URL structure has nothing at all to do with what Google considers "spammy" since the URL is in no way related to how a page ranks (except in the case of country-specific TLDs, which is irrelevant to this discussion).
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      StoreCoach.com- Learn How to Dropship the Right Way - Buy & Sell Websites - Partner with Coach
      My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox News, the NY Times & Flippa
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
    Webmasters that rely on Google Organic Traffic should consider the Google's upcoming change to "Link Attributes."

    March 01, 2020 the Hint Model goes into effect.

    Read More About it on the Google Webmaster Central Blog:
    Evolving "nofollow" - new ways to identify the nature of links
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  • Profile picture of the author nikitacod
    Structuring an ecommerce website should be easy right?

    Just take all of your product categories, make a page for each, add the products to each one, and you're done...

    Well not exactly.

    Common issues such as keyword cannibalisation can occur if you don't structure your site properly, which can leave you with lower rankings and ultimately less sales.
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    • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
      Originally Posted by nikitacod View Post

      Structuring an ecommerce website should be easy right?

      Just take all of your product categories, make a page for each, add the products to each one, and you're done...

      Well not exactly.

      Common issues such as keyword cannibalisation can occur if you don't structure your site properly, which can leave you with lower rankings and ultimately less sales.
      Keyword cannibilaztion WILL NOT lead to lower rankings. It just means that some of the pages using the same keyword phrases will be redundant and not rank for the same phrase that other pages are already ranking for.

      The goal is to get people over to your site. As long as you're ranking well for the keyword phrase with at least one of your pages, you should be pretty happy.
      Signature
      StoreCoach.com- Learn How to Dropship the Right Way - Buy & Sell Websites - Partner with Coach
      My PROVEN ecommerce process, as seen on: Fox News, the NY Times & Flippa
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
    Keywords are one of the main ways in which we direct the Google
    Bot to our desired page.

    When two or more keywords are the same on more than one page
    the Google Bot will determine one page (only one) that Google
    considers the best match for the searchers query. Search Intent!

    Hence, Keyword Cannibalization wherein two or more pages are
    populated with the same or similar keywords (phrase or terms)
    which forces the Google Bot to determine the one page that is
    returned to the searchers query.


    The consequence exists that the Google Bot may select a page that
    is not our desired page. When that happens the desired page is
    devalued by Google. We lose our desired organic traffic to the
    desired page and we often lose our desired conversion.

    The fix is easy, yet may may be twofold and may not be desirable.

    Fix #1. Use 301 Redirects sparingly if you already have multiple
    eCommerce pages ranking for the same terms. On mobile devices
    too many redirects may confuse the Google Bot.

    and/or

    Fix #2. Restructure all of the cannibalized (devalued) pages that
    are making use of the same or similar keywords, i.e. consolidate
    onto one page and only one page. This is desirable if your website
    uses the SILO structure.

    The take-away is the Google Bot will eventually direct all of the
    cannibalized pages aka devalued pages to your desired page.
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  • Please check your htaccess and correct soon
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  • Profile picture of the author nikitacod
    Structuring an ecommerce website should be easy right?

    Just take all of your product categories, make a page for each, add the products to each one, and you're done...

    Well not exactly.

    Common issues such as keyword cannibalisation can occur if you don't structure your site properly, which can leave you with lower rankings and ultimately less sales.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11575315].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author alicejohn
    E-commerce URLs as simple, relevant, compelling, and accurate as possible is key to getting both your users and search engines to understand them.
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  • Do not use /mens-clothes/ in all the URL's

    Make single Category with mens-clothes

    then in tat category some sub category - Don't use mens-clothes in sub categories
    go with url -
    /fitted-shirts-black/
    /casual-shirts/
    so on
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  • Profile picture of the author Elion Makkink
    Originally Posted by Flop View Post

    Often I notice e-commerce URLs being very different from the category page to the product page.

    For example:
    www.example.com/men-clothes/ for the category page
    once you click on the product page it becomes: www.example.com/fitted-shirts-black.com

    According to your experience, wouldn't it be more beneficial to structure the URL as such:
    http://www.example.com/men-clothes/f...irts-black.com ?

    Cheers
    Short answer: no. Because sometimes products can be accessible via multiple categories.

    example.com/men-clothes/fitted-shirts-black.com
    example.com/fitted-shirts/fitted-shirts-black.com


    Creating duplicate content issues. So you'll always want products in the root .
    Signature

    Cheers,
    Elion Makkink

    Become an SEO Hustler too at seohustlers.com

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